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Dr. Manish  Sharma  Do image

Dr. Manish Sharma Do

27417 Silver Thatch Dr
Wesley Chapel FL 33544
813 195-5896
Medical School: University Of New England, College Of Osteo Medicine - 1997
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: OS9680
NPI: 1982652574
Taxonomy Codes:
208M00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Manish Sharma is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99236 Description:Observ/hosp same date Average Price:$430.13 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$215.62
HCPCS Code:99291 Description:Critical care first hour Average Price:$434.21 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$221.88
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$388.25 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$199.10
HCPCS Code:99292 Description:Critical care addl 30 min Average Price:$216.87 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$111.47
HCPCS Code:99239 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$205.13 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.09
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$200.57 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$101.44
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$139.26 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.65
HCPCS Code:G0180 Description:MD certification HHA patient Average Price:$113.30 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$52.60

HCPCS Code Definitions

99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99292
Critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient; each additional 30 minutes (List separately in addition to code for primary service)
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99291
Critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient; first 30-74 minutes
99236
Observation or inpatient hospital care, for the evaluation and management of a patient including admission and discharge on the same date, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually the presenting problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 55 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99239
Hospital discharge day management; more than 30 minutes
G0180
Physician certification for medicare-covered home health services under a home health plan of care (patient not present), including contacts with home health agency and review of reports of patient status required by physicians to affirm the initial implementation of the plan of care that meets patient's needs, per certification period

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1285699645
Internal Medicine
8,774
1790744183
Diagnostic Radiology
4,101
1700829769
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
3,418
1871550483
Internal Medicine
2,875
1093768772
Anesthesiology
2,477
1346294253
Critical Care (Intensivists)
2,239
1689737538
Anesthesiology
2,082
1447234646
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
1,666
1336101450
Internal Medicine
1,485
1912978545
Infectious Disease
1,285
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Sharma has made to other doctors

Publications

Effects of Annealing on GaAs/GaAsSbN/GaAs Core-Multi-shell Nanowires. - Nanoscale research letters
The effects of ex-situ annealing in a N2 ambient on the properties of GaAs/GaAsSbN/GaAs core-multi-shell nanowires on Si (111) substrate grown by self-catalyzed molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are reported. As-grown nanowires exhibit band edge emission at ~0.99 eV with a shoulder peak at ~0.85 eV, identified to arise from band tail states. A large red shift of 7 cm(-1) and broadened Raman spectra of as-grown nanowires compared to that of non-nitride nanowires confirmed phonon localization at N-induced localized defects. On annealing nanowires to 750 °C, there was no change in the planar defects in the nanowire with respect to the as-grown nanowire; however, vanishing of the photoluminescence (PL) peak corresponding to band tail states along with enhanced band edge PL intensity, recovery of the Raman shift and increase in the Schottky barrier height from 0.1 to 0.4 eV clearly point to the efficient annihilation of point defects in these GaAsSbN nanowires. A significant reduction in the temperature-induced energy shift in the annealed nanowires is attributed to annihilation of band tail states and weak temperature dependence of N-related localized states. The observation of room temperature PL signal in the 1.3 μm region shows that the strategy of adding small amounts of N to GaAsSb is a promising route to realization of efficient nanoscale light emitters with reduced temperature sensitivity in the telecommunication wavelength region.
Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the treatment of abducens nerve schwannomas: a retrospective study. - Journal of neurosurgery
OBJECTIVE Of the intracranial schwannomas, those arising from the vestibular nerves are the most common. Abducens nerve (AN) schwannomas are very rare, and there is limited literature on their optimal management. Therapeutic options include surgery and/or stereotactic radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in these sixth cranial nerve (CN) schwannomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients who had undergone GKRS for intracranial tumors at their institute in the period from 2003 to 2010. Inclusion criteria were as follows: isolated AN paresis on presentation, a lesion along the course of the sixth CN, and imaging features characteristic of a schwannoma. Patients with other CN deficits and neurofibromatosis Type 2 were excluded. Symptomatic improvement was defined as the resolution of or an improvement in diplopia noted on a subjective basis or as an improvement in lateral eyeball excursion noted objectively on follow-up. A reduction in tumor volume by at least 20%, as noted by comparing the pre- and post-GKRS images, was deemed significant. RESULTS Six patients with a mean age of 37.1 years (range 17-55 years) underwent primary GKRS. There were 2 prepontine cistern, 3 cavernous sinus, and 1 cisterno-cavernous tumor. The mean duration of symptoms was 6.1 months (range 3-12 months). The mean tumor volume was 3.3 cm(3) (range 1.5-4.8 cm(3)). The mean tumor margin radiation dose was 12.5 Gy (range 12-14 Gy), while the median margin dose was 12 Gy (50% isodose line). The median number of isocenters used was 5 (range 4-8). The brainstem received an average 8.35-Gy radiation dosage (range 5.5-11 Gy). The mean follow-up duration was 44.3 months (range 24-78 months). Symptoms remained stable in 1 patient, improved in 3, and resolved in 2 (total improvement 83%). Magnetic resonance imaging at the last follow-up showed a stable tumor size in 3 patients (50%) and a reduction in the other 3. Thus, the tumor control rate achieved was 100%. No new CN deficits were noted. CONCLUSIONS Abducens nerve schwannomas are rare intracranial tumors. They can be cavernous, cisternal, or cisterno-cavernous in location. Excellent tumor control rates and symptomatic improvement can be achieved with GKRS, which appears to be a safe and effective, minimally invasive modality for the treatment of such lesions. Therefore, it is reasonable to consider GKRS as the initial treatment of choice for this rare pathology. Long-term follow-up will be essential for further recommendations.
Taking a Measured Approach to Toxicity Data in Phase I Oncology Clinical Trials. - Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
The standard categorical system for assessing attribution of toxicity to study drug(s) in phase I trials is cumbersome and uninformative. Although a binary system ("related" vs. "unrelated") would be sufficient to define maximum tolerated dose (MTD), a probability estimation would better support dose selection for randomized dose-ranging phase II trials. Clin Cancer Res; 22(3); 527-9. ©2015 AACR.See related article by Eaton et al., p. 553.©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
A Two-Step Haploidentical Versus a Two-Step Matched Related Allogeneic Myeloablative Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. - Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (SCT) offers a transplantation option to patients who lack an HLA-matched donor. We developed a 2-step approach to myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with haploidentical or matched related (MR) donors. In this approach, the lymphoid and myeloid portions of the graft are administered in 2 separate steps to allow fixed T cell dosing. Cyclophosphamide is used for T cell tolerization. Given a uniform conditioning regimen, graft T cell dose, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis strategy, we compared immune reconstitution and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing 2-step haploidentical versus 2-step MR SCT. We retrospectively compared data on patients undergoing a 2-step haploidentical (n = 50) or MR (n = 27) peripheral blood SCT for high-risk hematological malignancies and aplastic anemia. Both groups received myeloablative total body irradiation conditioning. Immune reconstitution data included flow cytometric assessment of T cell subsets at day 28 and 90 after SCT. Both groups showed comparable early immune recovery in all assessed T cell subsets except for the median CD3/CD8 cell count, which was higher in the MR group at day 28 compared with that in the haploidentical group. The 3-year probability of overall survival was 70% in the haploidentical group and 71% in the MR group (P = .81), while the 3-year progression-free survival was 68% in the haploidentical group and 70% in the MR group (P = .97). The 3-year cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality was 10% in the haploidentical group and 4% in the MR group (P = .34). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 21% in the haploidentical group and 27% in the MR group (P = .93). The 100-day cumulative incidence of overall grades II to IV acute GVHD was higher in the haploidentical group compared with that in the MR group (40% versus 8%, P < .001), whereas the grades III and IV acute GVHD was not statistically different between both groups (haploidentical, 6%; MR, 4%; P = .49). The cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus reactivation was also higher in the haploidentical group compared to the MR group (haploidentical, 68%; MR, 19%; P < .001). There were no deaths from GVHD in either group. Using an identical conditioning regimen, graft T cell dose, and GVHD prophylaxis strategy, comparable early immune recovery and clinical outcomes were observed in the 2-step haploidentical and MR SCT recipients.Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Diagnosis and medical and surgical management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. - JAAPA : official journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants
Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a complex condition with subtle history and examination findings that mimic other conditions. Primary care physician assistants often are the first providers to evaluate these patients. This article describes cervical spondylotic myelopathy, its diagnosis and management, and recent data that offer strong evidence that patients who undergo surgical decompression show significant improvement over patients who are treated conservatively.
Extracellular RNA facilitates hypoxia-induced leukocyte adhesion and infiltration in the lung through TLR3-IFN-γ-STAT1 signaling pathway. - European journal of immunology
Endogenous ligands released from dying cells, including extracellular RNA (eRNA), cause TLR activation, which is associated with inflammation and vascular diseases. However, the importance of this response in acute hypoxia (AH) remains unexplored. Here, we observed eRNA-mediated TLR3 activation during exposure of mice to AH in the absence of exogenous viral stimuli. RNaseA treatment diminished AH-induced expression of IFN and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and myeloid cell infiltration in the lung, and TLR3 gene silencing or neutralization with antibodies markedly attenuated AH- or poly I:C-induced IFN and CAM expression and leukocyte adhesion (LA) and myeloid cell infiltration in the lung. However, RNaseA treatment or TLR3 gene silencing failed to alter AH-induced cell death and proliferation in lung vasculature. Furthermore, IFN-γ-but not IFN-α-regulated AH-induced CAM expression and LA. Treatment with RNaseA, TLR3 siRNA, neutralizing antibodies, or a STAT1 inhibitor substantially decreased AH- and poly I:C-induced STAT1 phosphorylation, CAM expression, and myeloid cell infiltration, suggesting a central role for STAT1 phosphorylation in AH-induced LA and infiltration. We conclude that eRNA activates TLR3 and facilitates, through in vivo IFN-γ-STAT1 signaling, AH-induced leukocyte infiltration in the lung. Thus, RNaseA might provide a therapeutic alternative for patients with lung diseases.© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
Bone Marrow Transplantation for Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkins' Lymphoma in First Remission. - Current treatment options in oncology
Opinion statement: Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are rare and heterogeneous diseases that carry, with the exception of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+) anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a poor prognosis when treated with conventional chemotherapy. Historically, PTCL was treated like aggressive B-cell lymphomas, and to date cyclophosphamide, prednisone, vincristine, and doxorubicin (CHOP) remains the most commonly used regimen, despite disappointing results. Given the poor outcomes of PTCL patients, a number of studies have investigated the role of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) in the upfront setting, with different results. However, there are no prospective randomized trials, and the clinical benefit appears to be restricted to patients who achieve an objective response after induction chemotherapy. Nevertheless, with the exception of low-risk ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma, in light of the available data, HDT/ASCT for consolidation should be recommended for patients deemed eligible. The results of phase II trials showed that allogeneic stem cell transplantation can cure some relapsed/refractory patients, and few studies have evaluated this strategy in the frontline setting. With the availability of recently approved new drugs as well as new targeted agents under investigation, a number of ongoing studies are testing novel combinations aiming to improve rate and durability of responses to induction chemotherapy.
Norepinephrine-induced apoptotic and hypertrophic responses in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts are characterized by different repertoire of reactive oxygen species generation. - Redox biology
Despite recent advances, the role of ROS in mediating hypertrophic and apoptotic responses in cardiac myocytes elicited by norepinephrine (NE) is rather poorly understood. We demonstrate through our experiments that H9c2 cardiac myoblasts treated with 2µM NE (hypertrophic dose) generate DCFH-DA positive ROS only for 2h; while those treated with 100µM NE (apoptotic dose) sustains generation for 48h, followed by apoptosis. Though the levels of DCFH fluorescence were comparable at early time points in the two treatment sets, its quenching by DPI, catalase and MnTmPyP suggested the existence of a different repertoire of ROS. Both doses of NE also induced moderate levels of H2O2 but with different kinetics. Sustained but intermittent generation of highly reactive species detectable by HPF was seen in both treatment sets but no peroxynitrite was generated in either conditions. Sustained generation of hydroxyl radicals with no appreciable differences were noticed in both treatment sets. Nevertheless, despite similar profile of ROS generation between the two conditions, extensive DNA damage as evident from the increase in 8-OH-dG content, formation of γ-H2AX and PARP cleavage was seen only in cells treated with the higher dose of NE. We therefore conclude that hypertrophic and apoptotic doses of NE generate distinct but comparable repertoire of ROS/RNS leading to two very distinct downstream responses.Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
The proteome of Hypobaric Induced Hypoxic Lung: Insights from Temporal Proteomic Profiling for Biomarker Discovery. - Scientific reports
Exposure to high altitude induces physiological responses due to hypoxia. Lungs being at the first level to face the alterations in oxygen levels are critical to counter and balance these changes. Studies have been done analysing pulmonary proteome alterations in response to exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. However, such studies have reported the alterations at specific time points and do not reflect the gradual proteomic changes. These studies also identify the various biochemical pathways and responses induced after immediate exposure and the resolution of these effects in challenge to hypobaric hypoxia. In the present study, using 2-DE/MS approach, we attempt to resolve these shortcomings by analysing the proteome alterations in lungs in response to different durations of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Our study thus highlights the gradual and dynamic changes in pulmonary proteome following hypobaric hypoxia. For the first time, we also report the possible consideration of SULT1A1, as a biomarker for the diagnosis of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Higher SULT1A1 levels were observed in rats as well as in humans exposed to high altitude, when compared to sea-level controls. This study can thus form the basis for identifying biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in responses to hypobaric hypoxia.
In vitro synergistic effect of fluoroquinolone analogues in combination with artemisinin against Plasmodium falciparum; their antiplasmodial action in rodent malaria model. - Malaria journal
Emergence of drug-resistant parasite strains has surfaced as a major obstacle in attempts to ameliorate malaria. Current treatment regimen of malaria relies on the concept of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT).Fluoroquinolone analogues, compounds 10, 12 and 18 were investigated for their anti-malarial interaction in combination with artemisinin in vitro, against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain, employing fixed-ratio combination isobologram method. In addition, the efficacy of these compounds was evaluated intraperitoneally in BALB/c mice infected with chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium berghei ANKA strain in the Peters' four-day suppressive test.Promising results were obtained in the form of synergistic or additive interactions. Compounds 10 and 12 were found to have highly synergistic interactions with artemisinin. Antiplasmodial effect was further verified by the convincing ED50 values of these compounds, which ranged between 2.31 and 3.09 (mg/kg BW).In vivo studies substantiated the potential of the fluoroquinolone derivatives to be developed as synergistic partners for anti-malarial drug combinations.

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27417 Silver Thatch Dr Wesley Chapel, FL 33544
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