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Dr. Indu  Srinivasan  Md image

Dr. Indu Srinivasan Md

2500 N State St
Jackson MS 39216
601 844-4540
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 245000
NPI: 1972815967
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X 207RG0100X

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Publications

Hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound: Current status and future directions. - World journal of gastroenterology
The diagnosis and staging of various gastrointestinal malignancies have been made possible with the use of endoscopic ultrasound, which is a relatively safe procedure. The field of endoscopic ultrasound is fast expanding due to advancements in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. Though various studies have established its role in gastrointestinal malignancies and pancreatic conditions, its potential in the field of hepatic lesions still remains vastly untapped. In this paper the authors attempt to review important and landmark trials, case series and case studies involving hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound, thus not only providing an overview of utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in various liver conditions but also speculating its future role.
Endosonography guided management of pancreatic fluid collections. - World journal of gastroenterology
The revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was adopted by international consensus, and is based on actual local and systemic determinants of disease severity. The local determinant is pancreatic necrosis (sterile or infected), and the systemic determinant is organ failure. Local complications of pancreatitis can include acute peri-pancreatic fluid collection, acute necrotic collection, pseudocyst formation, and walled-off necrosis. Interventional endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been increasing utilized in managing these local complications. After performing a PubMed search, the authors manually applied pre-defined inclusion criteria or a filter to identify publications relevant to EUS and pancreatic collections (PFCs). The authors then reviewed the utility, efficacy, and risks associated with using therapeutic EUS and involved EUS devices in treating PFCs. Due to the development and regulatory approval of improved and novel endoscopic devices specifically designed for transmural drainage of fluid and necrotic debris (access and patency devices), the authors predict continuing evolution in the management of PFCs. We believe that EUS will become an indispensable part of procedures used to diagnose PFCs and perform image-guided interventions. After draining a PFC, the amount of tissue necrosis is the most important predictor of a successful outcome. Hence, it seems logical to classify these collections based on their percentage of necrotic component or debris present when viewed by imaging methods or EUS. Finally, the authors propose an algorithm for managing fluid collections based on their size, location, associated symptoms, internal echogenic patterns, and content.
Pancreatic necrosectomy using covered esophageal stents: a novel approach. - Journal of clinical gastroenterology
Endoscopic necrosectomy for necrotizing pancreatitis has been increasingly used as an alternative to surgical or percutaneous interventions. The use of fully covered esophageal self-expandable metallic stents may provide a safer and more efficient route for internal drainage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic treatment of pancreatic necrosis with these stents.A retrospective study at 2 US academic hospitals included patients with infected pancreatic necrosis from July 2009 to November 2012. These patients underwent transgastric placement of fully covered esophageal metallic stents draining the necrosis. After necrosectomy, patients underwent regular sessions of endoscopic irrigation and debridement of cystic contents. The efficacy endpoint was successful resolution of infected pancreatic necrosis without the need for surgical or percutaneous interventions.Seventeen patients were included with the mean age of 41±12 years. A mean of 5.3±3.4 sessions were required for complete drainage and the follow-up period was 237.6±165 days. Etiology included gallstone pancreatitis (6), alcohol abuse (6), s/p distal pancreatectomy (2), postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (1), medication-induced pancreatitis (1), and hyperlipidemia (1). Mean size of the necrosis was 14.8 cm (SD 5.6 cm), ranging from 8 to 19 cm. Two patients failed endoscopic intervention and required surgery. The only complication was a perforation during tract dilation, which was managed conservatively. Fifteen patients (88%) achieved complete resolution.Endoscopic necrosectomy with covered esophageal metal stents is a safe and successful treatment option for infected pancreatic necrosis.
Compliance with the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines for hyperlipidemia in a resident-run ambulatory clinic: a retrospective data analysis. - Journal of clinical lipidology
One in every six adults (16.3% of the U.S. adult population) has high total cholesterol levels, and they are at double the risk of heart disease compared with people with optimal levels.To evaluate compliance of internal medicine residents with the latest National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) guidelines in treating patients with hyperlipidemia.Retrospective observational study.Ambulatory Clinic, Saint Vincent Hospital, Worcester, Massachusetts.Patients with a diagnosis of hyperlipidemia who attended the clinic during a 1-ear period, from December 2009 to November 2010.A review of medical records was conducted to evaluate residents' compliance with the NCEP-ATP III guidelines for LDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol management.Seven hundred seventy charts were reviewed. Only 212 (27.5%) met the inclusion criteria. Analysis of data revealed better compliance with drug therapy (44%-77%) and therapeutic lifestyle changes (44%-83%) when compared with follow-up recommendations (22%-31%). An increase in compliance also was noted in all areas of intervention when patients had an abnormal lipid profile.Compliance was assessed on the basis of electronic medical record documentation alone and hence we may be underestimating compliance with therapeutic lifestyle changes and follow-up recommendations.Compliance among internal medicine residents in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with hyperlipidemia according to NCEP-ATP III guidelines was suboptimal and needs improvement.Copyright © 2013 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Interatrial block - a novel risk factor for acute mesenteric ischemia. - Indian journal of gastroenterology : official journal of the Indian Society of Gastroenterology
Interatrial block (IAB; P-wave duration ≥110 milliseconds) denotes a conduction delay between the two atria. IAB has been shown to have a strong correlation with atrial arrhythmias, left atrial enlargement, left atrial electromechanical dysfunction and cerebral thromboembolism. Our study sought to determine whether there was an increased incidence of IAB in patients with acute occlusive mesenteric ischemia. Medical records of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia (AMeI) from January 2009 to March 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. One hundred seventy-two out of 342 patients reviewed, qualified after excluding mechanical surgical obstruction, suspected non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia due to shock/hypoperfusion, and mesenteric venous thrombosis. Of 99 patients who were in normal sinus rhythm without prior history of atrial arrhythmia, 88 (88.9 %) had IAB. This was more than twice the average prevalence of IAB of two general hospital populations (41 % and 47 % as demonstrated by two previous studies). IAB may thus represent a novel risk factor for AMeI as it does for embolic stroke.
Metal stents for hilar lesions. - Gastrointestinal endoscopy clinics of North America
Strictures at the hilum are caused by varied conditions and don't usually become symptomatic until obstructing the bile ducts, thus posing diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to physicians. ERCP is the method of choice for tissue diagnosis and decompression. MRCP or MRI with dedicated liver protocol provides a unique ability to visualize anatomy and promote procedure planning. In patients with unresectable tumor, endoscopic biliary stenting is a palliative approach. Percutaneous or EUS-guided approach is reserved for endoscopic failure. Various new modalities such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and Photodynamic therapy have emerged but their superiority needs to be confirmed with Randomized Control studies.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Vertical P-wave axis: the electrocardiographic synonym for pulmonary emphysema and its severity. - Indian heart journal
The correlation between vertical P-wave axis (P-axis > 60°) and pulmonary emphysema was investigated on a very large controlled series to see if P-axis verticalisation as lone criterion can be effectively used to screen emphysema in general population. Correlation between degrees of P-axis verticalisation and the severity of the obstructive lung disease (as per global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease [GOLD] criteria) was also studied to see if this criterion can be used for gross quantification of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in routine clinical practice.Around 6500 unselected, routine electrocardiograms (ECGs) were reviewed which yielded 600 ECGs with vertical P-axis in sinus rhythm. 635 ECGs from the same continuum were selected with P-axis ≤60° matched for patient's age and sex serving as controls. Charts were reviewed for the diagnosis of COPD and emphysema based on medical history, pulmonary function tests, and imaging studies.Prevalence of emphysema in patients with vertical P-axis was strikingly higher than in the control group: 85% vs 4.4%. The sensitivity and specificity of vertical P-axis for diagnosing emphysema was 94.76% and 86.47%, respectively. Vertical P-axis and forced expiratory volume (FEV1) were inversely correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient=-0.683). Prevalence of severe COPD was strikingly higher in patients with P-axis > 75° as compared to the group with P-axis 60°-75°: 96.3% vs 4.6%. Close to 80% of the emphysema patients with P-axis > 85° had very severe disease (FEV1 < 30%).P-axis verticalisation is highly effective for screening emphysema and degree of verticalisation provides a gross quantification of the disease.Copyright © 2012 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Biliary stents in the millennium. - Advances in therapy
Biliary stents have now been in use for over two decades. Although a plethora of literature has been published on them, this review article is unique in its attempt to summarize important landmark trials and their implications on the management of various pancreatico-biliary disorders. This article will cover the various types of stents currently being used, established and upcoming indications, techniques of placement, and complications associated with stent use.
Comparison between endoscopic ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of pancreatic cancer. - Pancreas
Preoperative staging of pancreatic cancer is crucial for proper therapy. Through this study, we aimed to compare the ability of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to effectively detect and stage pancreatic cancer.One hundred twenty-seven patients undergoing EUS-fine-needle aspiration and MRI for the workup of pancreatic cancer were captured in a prospective database for comparison. The final surgical stage was recorded in patients who went to surgery.Of 127 patients, 48 were surgically explored, and of these, 22 (46%) underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Agreement in the patients' staging between EUS and MRI was 94 (74%) of 127. Magnetic resonance imaging was more likely to report metastatic disease or arterial involvement. The overall correlation between EUS and MRI was marginal (κ = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.26-0.58). Of the 48 surgically explored patients, 12 (25%) were understaged by MRI, 13 (27%) were understaged by EUS, and 1 (2%) were overstaged. Endoscopic US and MRI had a sensitivity of 34 (97.2%) of 35 for stage II tumors and 35 (100%) of 35 for lower-stage tumors, respectively.Endoscopic US and MRI had marginal correlation for staging, especially the more advanced tumors. Although EUS has the added advantage of tissue acquisition for confirmation, the tumors understaged by both the modalities were different. Therefore, both tests should be performed for accurate staging.
Prenatal and intrapartum events and sudden infant death syndrome. - Paediatric and perinatal epidemiology
The purpose of this study was to evaluate specific pregnancy and labour and delivery events that may increase the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). A matched case-control study was conducted in five counties in southern California, using California death certificate records. The sample consisted of 239 Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic and Asian mothers of SIDS infants and 239 mothers of control infants matched on sex, race, birth hospital and date of birth. Mothers participated in a detailed telephone interview and provided access to obstetric and paediatric records. More case than control mothers reported a family history of anaemia (OR=2.12, P < 0.001). Placental abruptions were strongly associated with SIDS (unadjusted OR=7.94, [95% CI 1.34,47.12]). There was an increased risk of SIDS death associated with maternal anaemia during pregnancy (OR=2.51, [95% CI 1.25,5.03]), while simultaneously adjusting for maternal smoking during pregnancy, maternal years of education and age, parity, infant birthweight, gestational age, medical conditions at birth, infant sleep position and post-natal smoking. Interactions of anaemia and prenatal smoking as well as anaemia and post-natal smoking were not statistically significant. There were no other statistically significant differences between case and control mothers for pregnancy conditions, labour and delivery events (e.g. caesarean sections, anaesthesia, forceps) or newborn complications (e.g. nuchal cord, meconium aspiration). Anaemia and placental abruptions were significantly associated with an increased risk of SIDS; both are circumstances in which a fetus may become hypoxic, thereby compromising the subsequent growth, development and ultimate survival of the infant.

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