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Dr. James  Doty  Md image

Dr. James Doty Md

2490 Hospital Drive Suite 106
Mountain View CA 94040
650 624-4545
Medical School: Tulane University School Of Medicine - 1981
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1972639151
Taxonomy Codes:
207T00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. James Doty is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:63047 Description:Removal of spinal lamina Average Price:$6,331.76 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$936.59
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$653.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$181.93
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$458.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$120.77
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$345.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$85.87
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$230.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$55.90

HCPCS Code Definitions

99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
63047
Laminectomy, facetectomy and foraminotomy (unilateral or bilateral with decompression of spinal cord, cauda equina and/or nerve root[s], [eg, spinal or lateral recess stenosis]), single vertebral segment; lumbar
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1295797322
Diagnostic Radiology
206
1700850559
Diagnostic Radiology
194
1487669933
Medical Oncology
182
1215901061
Diagnostic Radiology
142
1003990847
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
134
1780698233
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
121
1932102332
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
80
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Doty has made to other doctors

Publications

Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from prostate carcinoma: a case report. - Journal of medical case reports
Although vertebral and epidural metastases are common, intradural metastases and intramedullary spinal cord metastases are rare. The indications for the treatment of intramedullary spinal cord metastases remain controversial. We present the first biopsy-proven case of an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the prostate.Our patient was a 68-year-old right-handed Caucasian man with a Gleason grade 4 + 3 prostate adenocarcinoma who had previously undergone a prostatectomy, androgen blockade and transurethral debulking. He presented with new-onset saddle anesthesia and fecal incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a spindle-shaped intramedullary lesion of the conus medullaris. Our patient underwent decompression and an excisional biopsy; the lesion's pathology was consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Postoperatively, our patient received CyberKnife® radiosurgery to the resection cavity at a marginal dose of 27Gy to the 85% isodose line. At three months follow-up, our patient remains neurologically stable with no new deficits or lesions.We review the literature and discuss the indications for surgery and radiosurgery for intramedullary spinal cord metastases. We also report the novel use of stereotactic radiosurgery to sterilize the resection cavity following an excisional biopsy of the metastasis.
Modulation cancellation method for measurements of small temperature differences in a gas. - Optics letters
An innovative spectroscopic technique based on balancing and cancellation of modulated signals induced by two excitation sources is reported. For its practical implementation, we used quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy as an absorption-sensing technique and applied the new approach to measure small temperature differences between two gas samples. The achieved sensitivity was 30 mK in 17 s. A theoretical sensitivity analysis is presented, and the applicability of this method to isotopic measurements is discussed.
Resonant optothermoacoustic detection: technique for measuring weak optical absorption by gases and micro-objects. - Optics letters
We report a laser spectroscopy technique for detecting optical absorption in gases and micro-objects via linked thermal effects and by using a sharp mechanical resonance in a quartz crystal. The performance of this technique is studied using near-IR diode lasers and two gases, pure CO(2) and C(2)H(2) diluted in nitrogen. A 7.3 × 10(-8) cm(-1)W/(Hz)(1/2) noise equivalent sensitivity to absorption in gases is demonstrated. Based on experimental results, it was estimated that 10(-8) fractional absorption of optical radiation by a micro-object deposited on a thin transparent fiber can be detected.
Ultrasensitive detection of nitric oxide at 5.33 microm by using external cavity quantum cascade laser-based Faraday rotation spectroscopy. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
A transportable prototype Faraday rotation spectroscopic system based on a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser has been developed for ultrasensitive detection of nitric oxide (NO). A broadly tunable laser source allows targeting the optimum Q(3/2)(3/2) molecular transition at 1875.81 cm(-1) of the NO fundamental band. For an active optical path of 44 cm and 1-s lock-in time constant minimum NO detection limits (1sigma) of 4.3 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and 0.38 ppbv are obtained by using a thermoelectrically cooled mercury-cadmium-telluride photodetector and liquid nitrogen-cooled indium-antimonide photodetector, respectively. Laboratory performance evaluation and results of continuous, unattended monitoring of atmospheric NO concentration levels are reported.
The effects of hemodynamic shock and increased intra-abdominal pressure on bacterial translocation. - The Journal of trauma
We hypothesized that hemorrhagic shock followed by the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) resulted in bacterial translocation (BT) from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.Nineteen Yorkshire swine (20-30 kg) were divided into two groups. In the experimental group, group 1 (n = 10), animals were hemorrhaged to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 25-30 mm Hg for a period of 30 minutes and resuscitated to baseline MAP. Subsequently, intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was increased to 30 mm Hg above baseline by instilling sterile normal saline into the peritoneal cavity. The IAP was maintained at this level for 60 minutes. Acid/base status, gastric mucosal ph (pHi), superior mesenteric artery (SMA) blood flow, and hemodynamic parameters were measured and recorded. Blood samples were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of bacteria. Spleen, lymph node, and portal venous blood cultures were obtained at 24 hours. Results were analyzed by ANOVA and are reported as mean +/- SEM. The second group was the control. These animals did not have the hemorrhage, resuscitation, or intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) but were otherwise similar to the experimental group in terms of laparotomy and measured parameters.SMA blood flow in group 1 (baseline of 0.87 +/- 0.10 l/min) decreased in response to hemorrhage (0.53 +/- 0.10 l/min, p = 0.0001) and remained decreased with IAH (0.63 l/min +/- 0.10, p = 0.0006) as compared to control and returned towards baseline (1.01 +/- 0.5 l/min) on relief of IAH. pHi (baseline of 7.21 +/- 0.03) was significantly decreased with hemorrhage (7.04 +/- 0.03, p = 0.0003) and decreased further after IAH (6.99 +/- 0.03, p = 0.0001) in group 1 compared to control, but returned toward baseline at 24 hours (7.28 +/- 0.04). The mean arterial pH decreased significantly from 7.43 +/- 0.01 at baseline to 7.27 +/- 0.01 at its nadir within group 1 (p = 0.0001) as well as when compared to control (p = 0.0001). Base excess was also significantly decreased between groups 1 and 2 during hemorrhage (3.30 +/- 0.71 vs. 0.06 +/- 0.60, p = 0.001) and IAH (3.08 +/- 0.71 vs. -1.17 +/- 0.60, p = 0.0001). In group 1, 8 of the 10 animals had positive lymph node cultures, 2 of the 10 had positive spleen cultures, and 2 of the 10 had positive portal venous blood cultures for gram-negative enteric bacteria. Only 2 of the 10 animals had a positive PCR. In group 2, five of the nine animals had positive lymph node cultures, zero of the nine had positive spleen cultures, and one of the nine had positive portal venous blood cultures. Two of the nine animals had positive PCRs. There was no significant difference in cultures or PCR results between the two groups (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.3).In this study, hemorrhage followed by reperfusion and a subsequent insult of IAH caused significant GI mucosal acidosis, hypoperfusion, as well as systemic acidosis. These changes did not appear to be associated with a significant bacterial translocation as judged by PCR measurements, tissue, or blood cultures.

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2490 Hospital Drive Suite 106 Mountain View, CA 94040
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