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Dr. Kyle  Anderson  Md image

Dr. Kyle Anderson Md

26025 Lahser Rd 2Nd Floor
Southfield MI 48033
248 631-1900
Medical School: University Of Michigan Medical School - 1993
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 4301074015
NPI: 1952383176
Taxonomy Codes:
207X00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Kyle Anderson is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:29827 Description:Arthroscop rotator cuff repr Average Price:$3,557.69 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,178.54
HCPCS Code:23472 Description:Reconstruct shoulder joint Average Price:$3,399.90 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,636.86
HCPCS Code:29999 Description:Arthroscopy of joint Average Price:$1,868.85 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$550.57
HCPCS Code:29826 Description:Shoulder arthroscopy/surgery Average Price:$763.33 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$196.26
HCPCS Code:73221 Description:Mri joint upr extrem w/o dye Average Price:$850.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$346.38
HCPCS Code:J7321 Description:Hyalgan/supartz inj per dose Average Price:$210.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$90.69
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$260.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$168.76
HCPCS Code:20610 Description:Drain/inject joint/bursa Average Price:$158.52 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$73.86
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$170.80 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$110.43
HCPCS Code:73030 Description:X-ray exam of shoulder Average Price:$87.49 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$33.09
HCPCS Code:73080 Description:X-ray exam of elbow Average Price:$82.31 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$35.72
HCPCS Code:73562 Description:X-ray exam of knee 3 Average Price:$60.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$39.67
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$89.37 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$73.23
HCPCS Code:73560 Description:X-ray exam of knee 1 or 2 Average Price:$48.38 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$33.54
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$55.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$44.14
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$118.71 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$108.57
HCPCS Code:J3301 Description:Triamcinolone acet inj NOS Average Price:$4.79 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1.69

HCPCS Code Definitions

99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
73030
Radiologic examination, shoulder; complete, minimum of 2 views
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
20610
Arthrocentesis, aspiration and/or injection; major joint or bursa (eg, shoulder, hip, knee joint, subacromial bursa)
23472
Arthroplasty, glenohumeral joint; total shoulder (glenoid and proximal humeral replacement (eg, total shoulder))
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
J3301
Injection, triamcinolone acetonide, not otherwise specified, 10 mg
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
73221
Magnetic resonance (eg, proton) imaging, any joint of upper extremity; without contrast material(s)
73080
Radiologic examination, elbow; complete, minimum of 3 views
29826
Arthroscopy, shoulder, surgical; decompression of subacromial space with partial acromioplasty, with coracoacromial ligament (ie, arch) release, when performed (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
29827
Arthroscopy, shoulder, surgical; with rotator cuff repair
J7321
Hyaluronan or derivative, hyalgan or supartz, for intra-articular injection, per dose
73562
Radiologic examination, knee; 3 views
73560
Radiologic examination, knee; 1 or 2 views

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1194707497
Orthopedic Surgery
617
1902830755
Emergency Medicine
514
1306827761
Internal Medicine
344
1043292261
Orthopedic Surgery
274
1821072802
Anesthesiology
204
1386678134
Orthopedic Surgery
178
1649251810
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
140
1851318752
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
136
1780697425
Diagnostic Radiology
102
1992770986
Diagnostic Radiology
90
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Anderson has made to other doctors

Publications

Quantification of Borrelia burgdorferi Membrane Proteins in Human Serum: A New Concept for Detection of Bacterial Infection. - Analytical chemistry
The Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. The low abundance of bacterial proteins in human serum during infection imposes a challenge for early proteomic detection of Lyme disease. To address this challenge, we propose to detect membrane proteins released from bacteria due to disruption of their plasma membrane triggered by the innate immune system. These membrane proteins can be separated from the bulk of serum proteins by high-speed centrifugation causing substantial sample enrichment prior to targeted protein quantification using multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. This new approach was first applied to detection of B. burgdorferi membrane proteins supplemented in human serum. Our results indicated that detection of B. burgdorferi membrane proteins, which are ≈10(7) lower in abundance than major serum proteins, is feasible. Therefore, quantitative analysis was also carried out for serum samples from three patients with acute Lyme disease. We were able to demonstrate the detection of ospA, the major B. burgdorferi lipoprotein at the level of 4.0 fmol of ospA/mg of serum protein. The results confirm the concept and suggest that the proposed approach can be expanded to detect other bacterial infections in humans, particularly where existing diagnostics are unreliable.
Histone post-translational modifications in frontal cortex from human donors with Alzheimer's disease. - Clinical proteomics
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death and the most costly disease in the US. Despite the enormous impact of AD, there are no treatments that delay onset or stop disease progression currently on the market. This is partly due to the complexity of the disease and the largely unknown pathogenesis of sporadic AD, which accounts for the vast majority of cases. Epigenetics has been implicated as a critical component to AD pathology and a potential "hot spot" for treatments. Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are a key element in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and are known to be associated with the pathology of numerous diseases. Investigation of histone PTMs can help elucidate AD pathology and identify targets for therapies.A multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay was used to measure changes in abundance of several histone PTMs in frontal cortex from human donors affected with AD (n = 6) and age-matched, normal donors (n = 6). Of the changes observed, notable decreases in methylation of H2B residue K108 by 25 % and H4 residue R55 by 35 % were measured and are likely associated with hydrogen bonding networks important for nucleosome stability. Additionally, a 91 % increase in ubiquitination of K120 on H2B was measured as well as an apparent loss in acetylation of the region near the N-terminus of H4. Our method of quantification was also determined to be precise and robust, signifying measured changes were representative of true biological differences between donors and sample groups.We are the first to report changes in methylation of H2B K108, methylation of H4 R55, and ubiquitination of H2B K120 in frontal cortex from human donors with AD. These notable PTM changes may be of great importance in elucidating the epigenetic mechanism of AD as it relates to disease pathology. Beyond the structural and functional impacts of the changes we have measured, the sites of altered PTMs may be used to identify enzymes responsible for their modulation, which could be used as prospective drug targets for highly specific AD therapies.
Histone H3 Ser57 and Thr58 phosphorylation in the brain of 5XFAD mice. - FEBS open bio
Alzheimer's disease has been shown to have a global reduction in gene expression, called an epigenetic blockade, which may be regulated by histone post-translational modifications. Histone H3 has been shown to be highly regulated by phosphorylation. We, therefore, chose H3 for investigation of phosphorylation of the core sites serine-57 (S57) and threonine-58 (T58). Hemispheres of brains from a mouse model of rapid amyloid deposition (5XFAD) were used for measurement of S57 and T58 phosphorylation. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was used to measure the level of phosphorylation, which was normalized to a non-modified "housekeeping" peptide of H3. S57 phosphorylation was decreased by 40%, T58 phosphorylation was decreased by 45%, and doubly phosphorylated S57pT58p was decreased by 30% in 5XFAD brain in comparison to C57BL/6J age- and sex-matched wild type controls. Amyloid-β (Aβ) and amyloid precursor protein were also measured to confirm that 5XFAD mice produced high levels of Aβ. Decreased phosphorylation of these sites in close proximity to DNA may lead to stabilization of DNA-histone interactions and a condensed chromatin state, consistent with the epigenetic blockade associated with AD. Our findings of H3 sites S57 and T58 exhibiting lower levels of phosphorylation in 5XFAD model compared to wild type control implicate these sites in the epigenetic blockade in neurodegeneration pathology.
Retear Rates After Arthroscopic Single-Row, Double-Row, and Suture Bridge Rotator Cuff Repair at a Minimum of 1 Year of Imaging Follow-up: A Systematic Review. - Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
To determine whether there are differences in retear rates among arthroscopic single-row, double-row, and suture bridge rotator cuff repair.The literature was systematically reviewed for clinical outcome studies assessing arthroscopic single-row, double-row, or suture bridge rotator cuff repair. All included studies indicated the imaging-diagnosed retear rate stratified by preoperative tear size at a minimum of 1 year of follow-up, and retears were diagnosed with either magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, or arthrogram. Only studies with comprehensive surgical methods were included, and the repair type was confirmed by the number of rows of fixation and suture configuration. Studies from journals with an impact factor below 1.5 were excluded. Retear rates were grouped and statistically compared using χ(2) tests.Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria, yielding a total of 2,048 repairs. Double-row repair (DR) and suture bridge repair (SB) both had significantly lower retear rates than single-row repair (SR) for tears sized 1 to 3 cm (DR, P < .001; SB, P < .001), less than 3 cm (DR, P < .001; SB, P = .004), greater than 3 cm (DR, P = .016; SB, P = .003), and greater than 5 cm (DR, P = .003; SB, P = .003), as well as total retear rates (DR, P = .024; SB, P = .022). DR and SB did not differ significantly from each other in any tear size category.Both DR and SB have lower retear rates than SR in most tear size categories. No differences in retear rates were found between DR and SB.Level IV, systematic review of Level I through IV studies.Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Quantification of histone deacetylase isoforms in human frontal cortex, human retina, and mouse brain. - PloS one
Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition has promise as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, therapeutic HDAC inhibitors target many HDAC isoforms, a particularly detrimental approach when HDAC isoforms are known to have different and specialized functions. We have developed a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry assay using stable isotope-labeled QconCATs as internal standards to quantify HDAC isoforms. We further determined a quantitative pattern of specific HDACs expressed in various human and mouse neural tissues. In human AD frontal cortex, HDAC1,2 decreased 32%, HDAC5 increased 47%, and HDAC6 increased 31% in comparison to age-matched controls. Human neural retina concentrations of HDAC1, 2, HDAC5, HDAC6, and HDAC7 decreased in age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-affected donors and exhibited a greater decrease in AD-affected donors in comparison to age-matched control neural retinas. Additionally, HDAC concentrations were measured in whole hemisphere of brain of 5XFAD mice, a model of β-amyloid deposition, to assess similarity to AD in human frontal cortex. HDAC profiles of human frontal cortex and mouse hemisphere had noticeable differences and relatively high concentrations of HDAC3 and HDAC4 in mice, which were undetectable in humans. Our method for quantification of HDAC isoforms is a practical and efficient technique to quantify isoforms in various tissues and diseases. Changes in HDAC concentrations reported herein contribute to the understanding of the pathology of neurodegeneration.
Biomechanical Characterization of a Model of Noninvasive, Traumatic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in the Rat. - Annals of biomedical engineering
The onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) remains prevalent following traumatic joint injury such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, and animal models are important for studying the pathomechanisms of PTOA. Noninvasive ACL injury using the tibial compression model in the rat has not been characterized, and it may represent a more clinically relevant model than the common surgical ACL transection model. This study employed four loading profiles to induce ACL injury, in which motion capture analysis was performed, followed by quantitative joint laxity testing. High-speed, high-displacement loading repeatedly induces complete ACL injury, which causes significant increases in anterior-posterior and varus laxity. No loading protocol induced valgus laxity. Tibial internal rotation and anterior subluxation occurs up to the point of ACL failure, after which the tibia rotates externally as it subluxes over the femoral condyles. High displacement was more determinative of ACL injury compared to high speed. Low-speed protocols induced ACL avulsion from the femoral footprint whereas high-speed protocols caused either midsubstance rupture, avulsion, or a combination injury of avulsion and midsubstance rupture. This repeatable, noninvasive ACL injury protocol can be utilized in studies assessing PTOA or ACL reconstruction in the rat.
The effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on rotator cuff healing after injury and repair. - Clinical orthopaedics and related research
The failure rate of tendon-bone healing after repair of rotator cuff tears remains high. A variety of biologic- and cell-based therapies aimed at improving rotator cuff healing have been investigated, and stem cell-based techniques have become increasingly more common. However, most studies have focused on the implantation of exogenous cells, which introduces higher risk and cost. We aimed to improve rotator cuff healing by inducing endogenous stem cell mobilization with systemic administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).We asked: (1) Does G-CSF administration increase local cellularity after acute rotator cuff repair? (2) Is there histologic evidence that G-CSF improved organization at the healing enthesis? (3) Does G-CSF administration improve biomechanical properties of the healing supraspinatus tendon-bone complex? (4) Are there micro-MRI-based observations indicating G-CSF-augmented tendon-bone healing?After creation of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon defects with immediate repair, 52 rats were randomized to control or G-CSF-treated groups. G-CSF was administered for 5 days after repair and rats were euthanized at 12 or 19 postoperative days. Shoulders were subjected to micro-MR imaging, stress relaxation, and load-to-failure as well as blinded histologic and histomorphometric analyses.G-CSF-treated animals had significantly higher cellularity composite scores at 12 and 19 days compared with both control (12 days: 7.40 ± 1.14 [confidence interval {CI}, 5.98-8.81] versus 4.50 ± 0.57 [CI, 3.58-5.41], p = 0.038; 19 days: 8.00 ± 1.00 [CI, 6.75-9.24] versus 5.40 ± 0.89 [CI, 4.28-6.51], p = 0.023) and normal animals (12 days: p = 0.029; 19 days: p = 0.019). There was no significant difference between G-CSF-treated animals or control animals in ultimate stress (MPa) and strain, modulus (MPa), or yield stress (MPa) and strain at either 12 days (p = 1.000, p = 0.104, p = 1.000, p = 0.909, and p = 0.483, respectively) or 19 days (p = 0.999, p = 0.964, p = 1.000, p = 0.988, and p = 0.904, respectively). There was no difference in MRI score between G-CSF and control animals at either 12 days (2.7 ± 1.8 [CI, 1.08-4.24] versus 2.3 ± 1.8 [CI, 0.49-4.17], p = 0.623) or 19 days (2.5 ± 1.4 [CI, 1.05-3.94] versus 2.3 ± 1.5 [CI, 0.75-3.91], p = 0.737). G-CSF-treated animals exhibited significantly lower relative bone volume compared with normal animals in the entire humeral head (24.89 ± 3.80 [CI, 20.17-29.60) versus 32.50 ± 2.38 [CI, 29.99-35.01], p = 0.009) and at the supraspinatus insertion (25.67 ± 5.33 [CI, 19.04-32.29] versus 33.36 ± 1.69 [CI, 31.58-35.14], p = 0.027) at 12 days. Further analysis did not reveal any additional significant relationships with respect to regional bone volume or trabecular thickness between groups and time points (p > 0.05).Postoperative stem cell mobilization agents may be an effective way to enhance rotator cuff repair. Future studies regarding the kinetics of mobilization, the homing capacity of mobilized cells to injured tissues, and the ability of homing cells to participate in regenerative pathways are necessary.
Gene expression changes controlling distinct adaptations in the heart and skeletal muscle of a hibernating mammal. - Physiological genomics
Throughout the hibernation season, the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) experiences extreme fluctuations in heart rate, metabolism, oxygen consumption, and body temperature, along with prolonged fasting and immobility. These conditions necessitate different functional requirements for the heart, which maintains contractile function throughout hibernation, and the skeletal muscle, which remains largely inactive. The adaptations used to maintain these contractile organs under such variable conditions serves as a natural model to study a variety of medically relevant conditions including heart failure and disuse atrophy. To better understand how two different muscle tissues maintain function throughout the extreme fluctuations of hibernation we performed Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing of cDNAs to compare the transcriptome of heart and skeletal muscle across the circannual cycle. This analysis resulted in the identification of 1,076 and 1,466 differentially expressed genes in heart and skeletal muscle, respectively. In both heart and skeletal muscle we identified a distinct cold-tolerant mechanism utilizing peroxisomal metabolism to make use of elevated levels of unsaturated depot fats. The skeletal muscle transcriptome also shows an early increase in oxidative capacity necessary for the altered fuel utilization and increased oxygen demand of shivering. Expression of the fetal gene expression profile is used to maintain cardiac tissue, either through increasing myocyte size or proliferation of resident cardiomyocytes, while skeletal muscle function and mass are protected through transcriptional regulation of pathways involved in protein turnover. This study provides insight into how two functionally distinct muscles maintain function under the extreme conditions of mammalian hibernation.Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.
Natural flanking sequences for peptides included in a quantification concatamer internal standard. - Analytical chemistry
Quantification by targeted proteomics has largely depended on mass spectrometry and isotope-labeled internal standards. In addition to traditionally used recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, concatenated peptides (QconCATs) were introduced as a conceptually new source of internal standard. In the present study, we focused on assessing the length of natural flanking sequences, which surround each peptide included in QconCAT and provide for identical rates of analyte and standard digestion by trypsin. We have expressed, purified, and characterized a set of seven (15)N-labeled QconCATs that cover seven tryptic peptides from human clusterin with a length of natural flanking sequences ranging from none (+0) to six amino acid residues (+6) for each tryptic peptide. Individual QconCATs were mixed with recombinant human clusterin at a 1:1 molar ratio and digested, and the actual ratios for each combination of peptide/flanking sequence were measured with a multiple reaction monitoring assay. Data analysis suggested that natural flanking sequences shorter than +6 residues can cause a quantitative error because the random appearance of other amino acid residues in close proximity to trypsin cleavage sites has unpredictable consequences for the digestion rates of QconCATs.
Patients' comprehension of their emergency department encounter: a pilot study using physician observers. - Annals of emergency medicine
The current study examines patients' comprehension of their emergency department (ED) encounter, using physician observers to document both physician communication and details of the encounter.Eighty-nine patients were recruited from a convenience sample in an urban ED. To be included in this study, patients had to have low triage levels (4 and 5) and be discharged from the ED. Physician observers were present throughout the encounter, documenting physician communication and procedures performed. Patients were then interviewed by physician observers about their communication with physicians, accuracy in recalling facts about the encounter, and understanding of information provided during the encounter.The majority of patients were black and had a high school education. Physicians typically engaged in behaviors related to building rapport and diagnosing patients. However, physicians informed patients about test results and diagnoses less frequently. In terms of patients' accuracy and understanding of the visit, patients were generally aware of basic facts in regard to their ED encounter (ie, whether they had blood drawn), but 65.9% of patients demonstrated less than "good" understanding in at least 1 area assessed.The findings of the current study indicate physicians could improve communication with patients, particularly in regard to care received in the ED. This study also indicates that a large percentage of patients fail to understand information about their ED encounter even when physicians provide it. A primary limitation of the current study is the relatively homogenous physician sample.Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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26025 Lahser Rd 2Nd Floor Southfield, MI 48033
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