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Dr. Sheldon  Benjamin  Md image

Dr. Sheldon Benjamin Md

55 Lake Ave N
Worcester MA 01655
508 562-2527
Medical School: Medical College Of Ohio At Toledo - 1980
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 48019
NPI: 1952375248
Taxonomy Codes:
2084P0800X

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Dr. Sheldon Benjamin is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$260.50 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$77.54

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

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Publications

Neuropsychiatry and neural cubism. - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
The art movement known as Cubism did not represent a failure of perspective but, rather, was a movement aimed at advancing art by juxtaposing different perspectives. In this issue, Taylor and colleagues describe the current approach by neurologists and psychiatrists to patients with brain disorders as "Neural Cubism" because of the competing angles of these specialists' perspectives about these disorders. They advocate both integrated training for all residents in the two fields and a system of "nested hierarchies" to reclassify brain disorders according to their effect on levels of brain function. The unspoken premise of their article is that it is time for psychiatry and neurology to reunite.This Commentary takes the view that reuniting the long-separated specialties of neurology and psychiatry would not necessarily create better care for all patients with brain disorders but that trainees in both fields would benefit from increased training in the complementary specialty. The new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education clinical neuroscience milestones for psychiatry training and psychiatry milestones for neurology training are steps in the right direction. Increasing opportunities for combined neurology-psychiatry training will help create a cadre of specialists equipped to efficiently care for complex patients within emerging accountable care organizations. Drawing from two fields in the service of understanding brain-behavior interactions increases the potential for innovation at their interface. The author concludes that the time has come to increase the neurological and neuroscience content of psychiatry training but not to unite the two fields.
Neuropsychiatry and neuroscience education of psychiatry trainees: attitudes and barriers. - Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry
The American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) Task Force on Neuropsychiatry and Neuroscience Education of Psychiatry Residents was established in 2011 with the charge to seek information about what the field of psychiatry considers the core topics in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience to which psychiatry residents should be exposed; whether there are any "competencies" in this area on which the field agrees; whether psychiatry departments have the internal capacity to teach these topics if they are desirable; and what the reception would be for "portable curricula" in neuroscience.The task force reviewed the literature and developed a survey instrument to be administered nationwide to all psychiatry residency program directors. The AADPRT Executive Committee assisted with the survey review, and their feedback was incorporated into the final instrument.In 2011-2012, 226 adult and child and adolescent psychiatry residency program directors responded to the survey, representing over half of all US adult and child psychiatry training directors. About three quarters indicated that faculty resources were available in their departments but 39% felt the lack of neuropsychiatry faculty and 36% felt the absence of neuroscience faculty to be significant barriers. Respectively, 64 and 60% felt that neuropsychiatry and psychiatric neuroscience knowledge were very important or critically important to the provision of excellent care. Ninety-two percent were interested in access to portable neuroscience curricula.There is widespread agreement among training directors on the importance of neuropsychiatry and neuroscience knowledge to general psychiatrists but barriers to training exist, including some programs that lack faculty resources and a dearth of portable curricula in these areas.
A DSM-5 to-do list for adult psychiatry residency directors. - Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry
A small study within the author's department, comparing resident and faculty attitudes toward the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5), revealed that the DSM-5 transition process is starting from a point in which neither faculty nor residents are optimistic that the new DSM will result in improved diagnosis or treatment. However, the publication of DSM-5 presents training directors with opportunities to engage trainees in the study of the evolution of psychiatric nosology and the evidence for core psychiatric diagnoses. Residents should be encouraged to become familiar with both DSM-5 and National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria (NIMH RDoC) categories in their study of the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders. Department chairs are encouraged to establish timelines for the DSM-5 transition for faculty, residents, medical student teaching, medical record keeping, and billing for services. Training directors should be aware that national examinations for trainees will transition gradually between 2014 and 2017, so comparisons should be made whenever possible between DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5. To minimize trainee confusion, departments should attend to the coherence of transition timelines among faculty, resident, and medical student training.
Congenital and acquired disorders presenting as psychosis in children and young adults. - Child and adolescent psychiatric clinics of North America
A review of the published literature found 60 congenital and acquired disorders with symptoms that include psychosis in youth. The prevalence, workup, genetics, and associated neuropsychiatric features of each disorder are described. Eighteen disorders (30%) have distinct phenotypes (doorway diagnoses); 18 disorders (30%) are associated with intellectual disability; and 43 disorders (72%) have prominent neurologic signs. Thirty-one disorders (52%) can present without such distinct characteristics, and are thus more easily overlooked. A systematic and cost-effective differential diagnostic approach based on estimated prevalence and most prominent associated signs is recommended.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Educating psychiatry residents in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience. - International review of psychiatry (Abingdon, England)
Neuropsychiatry and psychiatric neuroscience should be part of the general psychiatry curriculum so that graduate psychiatrists will be able to allow their patients the benefit of neuroscientifically informed diagnosis and treatment. Current neurology and neuroscience educational requirements for US psychiatry training are reviewed. The draft milestone requirements for clinical neuroscience training as part of the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System are also provided. Suggestions for the neuropsychiatric and neuroscience content of psychiatry residency training are made, along with a description of pedagogic methods and resources. Survey data are reviewed indicating agreement by programme directors with the importance of neuroscience training and an increase in the amount of time devoted to this area. Faculty staff development in neuropsychiatry and neuroscience literacy will be needed to provide high quality training in these areas.
Psychopharmacology curriculum field test. - Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry
As part of an effort to improve psychopharmacology training in psychiatric residency programs, a committee of residency training directors and associate directors adapted an introductory schizophrenia presentation from the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology's Model Psychopharmacology Curriculum to develop a multimodal, interactive training module. This article describes the module, its development, and the results of a field trial to test its feasibility and usefulness.Nineteen residency programs volunteered to use the module during the first half of the 2007-2008 academic year. Evaluation consisted of a structured phone interview with the training director or teaching faculty of participating programs during February and early March 2008, asking whether and how they used the curriculum, which components they found most useful, and how it was received by faculty and residents.Of the 19 programs, 14 used the module and 13 participated in the evaluation. The most commonly used components were the pre- and postmodule questions, video-enhanced presentation, standard presentation, problem- or team-based teaching module, and other problem-based teaching modules. No two programs used the module in the same fashion, but it was well received by instructors and residents regardless of use.The results of this field trial suggest that a dynamic, adult-centered curriculum that is exciting, innovative, and informative enough for a wide variety of programs can be developed; however, the development and programmatic barriers require considerable time and effort to overcome.
The differential diagnosis of childhood- and young adult-onset disorders that include psychosis. - The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
The evaluation of psychotic individuals for inherited or congenital etiologies is fraught with complexity. The authors reviewed the published literature and found 62 congenital disorders that include psychosis. Their prevalence, workup, genetics, and associated neuropsychiatric features are described. Eighteen disorders (29%) have distinct phenotypes ("doorway diagnoses"); 17 disorders (27%) are associated with mental retardation; and 45 disorders (73%) have prominent neurological signs. Thirty-four disorders (55%) can present without such distinct characteristics, and are thus more readily overlooked. We recommend a systematic and cost-effective differential diagnostic approach based on estimated prevalence and most prominent associated signs.
Online resources for assessment and evaluation. - Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry
The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Liaison Committee on Medical Education have mandated the transition from written global evaluation methods to competency-based assessments in resident and medical student training. Assessment of competency requires analysis of performance data from numerous sources. This article reviews characteristics of Web-based evaluation and assessment systems and recommends areas for further development.The authors review functions common to a variety of online evaluation and curriculum management systems with attention to their adaptation for competency documentation and assessment. Details of online global assessments, examination methods, electronic portfolios, procedure/case logs, and survey systems are provided along with a list of Internet resources.Online evaluation and assessment systems not only provide data on trainee competence but can provide valuable feedback on faculty teaching, curriculum quality, and the learning environment. Suggestions for future development, legal ambiguities that could become obstacles, and the need to clarify the responsibility for funding this work are discussed. Web-based performance assessment and evaluation are seen in the larger context of moving toward competency assessment of practicing physicians.Online assessment systems offer advantages over paper systems in allowing robust data analysis, reporting, and flexibility. A national online procedure/case log tracking system would facilitate gathering data that could provide one type of experiential benchmark for determining competency.
APA summit on medical student education task force on informatics and technology: steps to enhance the use of technology in education through faculty development, funding and change management. - Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry
This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine.The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing technology in medical education.Administrators and faculty should initially assess their own competencies with technology and then develop a variety of teaching methods that use technology to improve their curricula. Programs should decrease the general knowledge-based content of curricula and increase the use of technology for learning skills. For programs to be successful, they must address faculty development, change management, and funding.Willingness for change, collaboration, and leadership at all levels are essential factors for successfully implementing technology.
APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: learning about computers and applying computer technology to education and practice. - Academic psychiatry : the journal of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry
This article provides a brief overview of important issues for educators regarding medical education and technology.The literature describes key concepts, prototypical technology tools, and model programs. A work group of psychiatric educators was convened three times by phone conference to discuss the literature. Findings were presented to and input was received from the 2005 Summit on Medical Student Education by APA and the American Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry.Knowledge of, skills in, and attitudes toward medical informatics are important to life-long learning and modern medical practice. A needs assessment is a starting place, since student, faculty, institution, and societal factors bear consideration. Technology needs to "fit" into a curriculum in order to facilitate learning and teaching.Learning about computers and applying computer technology to education and clinical care are key steps in computer literacy for physicians.

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