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Dr. Lisa  Lee  Md image

Dr. Lisa Lee Md

300 Pasteur Dr
Stanford CA 94305
650 234-4000
Medical School: Stanford University School Of Medicine - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1952374936
Taxonomy Codes:
207V00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Lisa Lee is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$530.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$186.87
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$364.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$141.81
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$340.69 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$123.19
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$264.79 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$78.76
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$218.81 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$85.87

HCPCS Code Definitions

99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1346215100
Gynecological Oncology
567
1679614481
Pathology
63
1366405953
Diagnostic Radiology
46
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Lee has made to other doctors

Publications

How does joint procurement affect the design, customisation and usability of a hospital ePrescribing system? - Health informatics journal
The aim of this article is to explore the effect of the joint procurement model adopted during the English National Programme for Information Technology (NPfIT) on the customisation, design and usability of a hospital ePrescribing system. Drawing on qualitative data collected at two case study sites deploying an ePrescribing system jointly procured within one of the NPfIT's geographical clusters, we explain how procurement decisions, difficult relationships with the supplier and strict contractual arrangements contributed to usability issues and difficulties in the customisation process. While some limited change requests made by users were taken up by the developers, these were seen by users as insufficient to meet local clinical needs and practices. A joint procurement approach, such as the NPfIT, thus limited the opportunity and scope of the changes to the ePrescribing system, which impinged not only on the perceived success of the implementation but also on the system's usability.© The Author(s) 2015.
Obesity and cancer progression: is there a role of fatty acid metabolism? - BioMed research international
Currently, there is renewed interest in elucidating the metabolic characteristics of cancer and how these characteristics may be exploited as therapeutic targets. Much attention has centered on glucose, glutamine and de novo lipogenesis, yet the metabolism of fatty acids that arise from extracellular, as well as intracellular, stores as triacylglycerol has received much less attention. This review focuses on the key pathways of fatty acid metabolism, including uptake, esterification, lipolysis, and mitochondrial oxidation, and how the regulators of these pathways are altered in cancer. Additionally, we discuss the potential link that fatty acid metabolism may serve between obesity and changes in cancer progression.
Accelerating measles elimination and strengthening routine immunization services in Guizhou Province, China, 2003-2009. - Vaccine
To develop a successful model for accelerating measles elimination in poor areas of China, we initiated a seven-year project in Guizhou, one of the poorest provinces, with reported highest measles incidence of 360 per million population in 2002.Project strategies consisted of strengthening routine immunization services, enforcement of school entry immunization requirements at kindergarten and school, conducting supplemental measles immunization activities (SIAs), and enhancing measles surveillance. We measured coverage of measles containing vaccines (MCV) by administrative reporting and population-based sample surveys, systematic random sampling surveys, and convenience sampling surveys for routine immunization services, school entry immunization, and SIAs respectively. We measured impact using surveillance based measles incidence.Routine immunization coverage of the 1st dose of MCV (MCV1) increased from 82% to 93%, while 2nd dose of MCV (MCV2) coverage increased from 78% to 91%. Enforcement of school entry immunization requirements led to an increase in MCV2 coverage from 36% on primary school entry in 2004 to 93% in 2009. Province-wide SIAs achieved coverage greater than 90%. The reported annual incidence of measles dropped from 200 to 300 per million in 2003 to 6 per million in 2009, and sustained at 0.9-2.2 per million in 2010-2013.This project found that a package of strategies including periodic SIAs, strengthened routine immunization, and enforcing school entry immunization requirements, was an effective approach toward achieving and sustaining measles elimination in less-developed area of China.Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Adding justice to the clinical and public health ethics arguments for mandatory seasonal influenza immunisation for healthcare workers. - Journal of medical ethics
: The very first requirement in a hospital is that it should do the sick no harm.Florence NightingaleEthical considerations from both the clinical and public health perspectives have been used to examine whether it is ethically permissible to mandate the seasonal influenza vaccine for healthcare workers (HCWs). Both frameworks have resulted in arguments for and against the requirement. Neither perspective resolves the question fully. By adding components of justice to the argument, I seek to provide a more fulsome ethical defence for requiring seasonal influenza immunisation for HCWs. Two critical components of a just society support requiring vaccination: fairness of opportunity and the obligation to follow democratically formulated rules. The fairness of opportunity is informed by Rawls' two principles of justice. The obligation to follow democratically formulated rules allows us to focus simultaneously on freedom, plurality and solidarity. Justice requires equitable participation in and benefit from cooperative schemes to gain or profit socially as individuals and as a community. And to be just, HCW immunisation exemptions should be limited to medical contraindications only. In addition to the HCWs fiduciary duty to do what is best for the patient and the public health duty to protect the community with effective and minimally intrusive interventions, HCWs are members of a just society in which all members have an obligation to participate equitably in order to partake in the benefits of membership.Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
Using stakeholder perspectives to develop an ePrescribing toolkit for NHS Hospitals: a questionnaire study. - JRSM open
To evaluate how an online toolkit may support ePrescribing deployments in National Health Service hospitals, by assessing the type of knowledge-based resources currently sought by key stakeholders.Questionnaire-based survey of attendees at a national ePrescribing symposium.2013 National ePrescribing Symposium in London, UK.Eighty-four delegates were eligible for inclusion in the survey, of whom 70 completed and returned the questionnaire.Estimate of the usefulness and type of content to be included in an ePrescribing toolkit.Interest in a toolkit designed to support the implementation and use of ePrescribing systems was high (n = 64; 91.4%). As could be expected given the current dearth of such a resource, few respondents (n = 2; 2.9%) had access or used an ePrescribing toolkit at the time of the survey. Anticipated users for the toolkit included implementation (n = 62; 88.6%) and information technology (n = 61; 87.1%) teams, pharmacists (n = 61; 87.1%), doctors (n = 58; 82.9%) and nurses (n = 56; 80.0%). Summary guidance for every stage of the implementation (n = 48; 68.6%), planning and monitoring tools (n = 47; 67.1%) and case studies of hospitals' experiences (n = 45; 64.3%) were considered the most useful types of content.There is a clear need for reliable and up-to-date knowledge to support ePrescribing system deployments and longer term use. The findings highlight how a toolkit may become a useful instrument for the management of knowledge in the field, not least by allowing the exchange of ideas and shared learning.
New antibody approaches to lymphoma therapy. - Journal of hematology & oncology
The CD20-directed monoclonal antibody rituximab established a new era in lymphoma therapy. Since then other epitopes on the lymphoma surface have been identified as potential targets for monoclonal antibodies (mAb). While most mAbs eliminate lymphoma cells mainly by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement-dependent cytotoxicity or direct cell death, others counter mechanisms utilized by malignant cells to evade immune surveillance. Expression of PD-L1 on malignant or stromal cells in the tumor environment for example leads to T-cell anergy. Targeting either PD-1 or PD-L1 via mAbs can indirectly eliminate cancer cells by unblocking the host intrinsic immune response. Yet another mechanism of targeted therapy with mAbs are bi-specific T-cell engagers (BiTE) such as blinatumomab, which directly engages the host immune cells. These examples highlight the broad spectrum of available therapies targeting the lymphoma surface with mAbs utilizing both passive and active immune pathways. Many of these agents have already demonstrated significant activity in clinical trials. In this review we will focus on novel CD20-directed antibodies as well as mAbs directed against newer targets like CD19, CD22, CD40, CD52 and CCR4. In addition we will review mAbs unblocking immune checkpoints and the BiTE blinatumomab. Given the success of mAbs and the expansion in active and passive immunotherapies, these agents will play an increasing role in the treatment of lymphomas.
Patient perception of pain care in the United States: a 5-year comparative analysis of hospital consumer assessment of health care providers and systems. - Pain physician
The necessity of aggressive pain management in the hospital setting is becoming increasingly evident. It has been shown to improve patient outcomes, and is now an avenue for Medicare to assess reimbursement. In this cohort analysis, we compared the March 2008 to the December 2012 Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (HCAHPS) reports in order to determine if pain management has improved in the United States after this national standardized survey was created.To evaluate whether pain perception would improve in the 2012 report relative to the 2008 report.Statistical analyses were conducted with the HCAHPS report to compare pain control in regards to hospital type, hospital ownership, and individual hospitals. Using the question, "How often is your pain controlled?," T-tests were used to compare each hospital type. Hospital ownerships were assessed via analysis of variance (ANOVA) testing. T-tests were conducted to track the difference of hospital performance between the 2008 and the 2012 report. Paired management data were obtained from hospitals that participated in both reports and were assessed using paired T-tests.This survey was administered to a random sample of adult inpatients between 48 hours and 6 weeks after discharge from any hospital reporting to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) across the US.Limitations of this study include response bias, recall bias, and there may be bias related to types of people likely to respond to a survey, but this is inherent to data that is collected on a voluntary response. Additionally, a 3% increase in the number of patients rating their pain as always well-controlled, while statistically significant, admittedly may not be clinically significant. In addition, the raw data collected is adjusted for the effects of patient-mix. The statistical analyses performed to derive the final quarterly HCAHPS reports are unavailable to us and therefore we cannot comment on how individual factors such as age, sex, race, and education or the interaction of the aforementioned affect responses about the patient's perception on how well their pain was controlled between 2008 and 2012.Two thousand three hundred and ninety five hospitals reported pain management data in both 2008 and 2012. In 2012, hospitals improved their ability to "always control a patients pain" by 3.07% (P < 0.0001) in comparison to the baseline March 2008 report, which was statistically significant. According to the 2012 data, the discrepancy in pain management between acute care hospitals and critical access hospitals was 3.33% which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Government hospitals were shown to manage pain better at baseline, but all 3 types of ownership improved their pain scores between the 2 reports which was shown to be statistically significant (P < 0.01).The HCAHPS survey is a national public standardized report used as a way to compare care in the United States. Patient pain perception has improved between the 2008 and 2012 reports. Further studies are needed to evaluate critical care hospitals.
Teaching bioethics. - The Hastings Center report
From accessible and affordable health care to old or new reproductive technologies, human or animal research, and beyond, the justice and well-being of our society depends on the ability of key groups-such as scientists and health care providers-along with members of the public to identify the key issues, articulate their values and concerns, deliberate openly and respectfully, and together find the most defensible ways forward. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues and The Hastings Center are committed to improving the ethical literacy of the American public in the domain of bioethics. But what are the best educational practices to spur and support these sorts of societal conversations? And where are the greatest gaps in our collective knowledge of how best to inspire and increase moral understanding, analytical thinking in the moral domain, and professional integrity?© 2014 by The Hastings Center.
Impact of induction regimen and stem cell transplantation on outcomes in double-hit lymphoma: a multicenter retrospective analysis. - Blood
Patients with double-hit lymphoma (DHL), which is characterized by rearrangements of MYC and either BCL2 or BCL6, face poor prognoses. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study of the impact of baseline clinical factors, induction therapy, and stem cell transplant (SCT) on the outcomes of 311 patients with previously untreated DHL. At median follow-up of 23 months, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates among all patients were 10.9 and 21.9 months, respectively. Forty percent of patients remain disease-free and 49% remain alive at 2 years. Intensive induction was associated with improved PFS, but not OS, and SCT was not associated with improved OS among patients achieving first complete remission (P = .14). By multivariate analysis, advanced stage, central nervous system involvement, leukocytosis, and LDH >3 times the upper limit of normal were associated with higher risk of death. Correcting for these, intensive induction was associated with improved OS. We developed a novel risk score for DHL, which divides patients into high-, intermediate-, and low-risk groups. In conclusion, a subset of DHL patients may be cured, and some patients may benefit from intensive induction. Further investigations into the roles of SCT and novel agents are needed.© 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.
When a blood donor has sickle cell trait: incidental findings and public health. - The Hastings Center report
There are no national recommendations for routine screening for sickle cell trait, nor is there guidance on whether or how to notify donors that they might be tested or identified as having sickle cell trait. As a result, the organizations that collect blood have implemented variable policies about whether and how to inform prospective donors of the possible screening and discovery of this noncommunicable condition. The question of what they should do is related to the broader question of how to handle incidental and secondary findings. In a recent report, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues outline a framework for handling such findings in the clinical, research, and direct-to-consumer contexts. While the commission's report did not directly address incidental and secondary findings in the public health context of blood donation, it made several overarching recommendations that apply in all contexts where such findings might arise. This essay outlines the special issues raised by discovering sickle cell trait in blood donation and considers the implications of the commission's framework for that problem.© 2014 The Hastings Center.

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300 Pasteur Dr Stanford, CA 94305
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