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Dr. Mark-Friedrich  Hurdle  Md image

Dr. Mark-Friedrich Hurdle Md

4500 San Pablo Rd S
Jacksonville FL 32224
904 532-2000
Medical School: Temple University School Of Medicine - 1999
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #:
NPI: 1952374043
Taxonomy Codes:
208100000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Mark-Friedrich Hurdle is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:76942 Description:Echo guide for biopsy Average Price:$243.03 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$188.30
HCPCS Code:64483 Description:Inj foramen epidural l/s Average Price:$153.97 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$110.72
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$169.22 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$133.46
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$214.50 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$191.51
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$175.81 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$154.59
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$117.87 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.19
HCPCS Code:20610 Description:Drain/inject joint/bursa Average Price:$87.10 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.73
HCPCS Code:64493 Description:Inj paravert f jnt l/s 1 lev Average Price:$128.10 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$112.58
HCPCS Code:27096 Description:Inject sacroiliac joint Average Price:$95.15 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$81.64
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$114.06 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$100.76
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$79.83 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.10
HCPCS Code:62311 Description:Inject spine l/s (cd) Average Price:$95.65 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$84.62
HCPCS Code:64494 Description:Inj paravert f jnt l/s 2 lev Average Price:$75.87 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.37
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$45.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.36
HCPCS Code:77003 Description:Fluoroguide for spine inject Average Price:$32.67 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.74
HCPCS Code:J3301 Description:Triamcinolone acet inj NOS Average Price:$1.76 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1.61

HCPCS Code Definitions

99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
77003
Fluoroscopic guidance and localization of needle or catheter tip for spine or paraspinous diagnostic or therapeutic injection procedures (epidural or subarachnoid)
J3301
Injection, triamcinolone acetonide, not otherwise specified, 10 mg
64483
Injection(s), anesthetic agent and/or steroid, transforaminal epidural, with imaging guidance (fluoroscopy or CT); lumbar or sacral, single level
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
64493
Injection(s), diagnostic or therapeutic agent, paravertebral facet (zygapophyseal) joint (or nerves innervating that joint) with image guidance (fluoroscopy or CT), lumbar or sacral; single level
20610
Arthrocentesis, aspiration and/or injection; major joint or bursa (eg, shoulder, hip, knee joint, subacromial bursa)
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
62311
Injection(s), of diagnostic or therapeutic substance(s) (including anesthetic, antispasmodic, opioid, steroid, other solution), not including neurolytic substances, including needle or catheter placement, includes contrast for localization when performed, epidural or subarachnoid; lumbar or sacral (caudal)
27096
Injection procedure for sacroiliac joint, anesthetic/steroid, with image guidance (fluoroscopy or CT) including arthrography when performed
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
76942
Ultrasonic guidance for needle placement (eg, biopsy, aspiration, injection, localization device), imaging supervision and interpretation
64494
Injection(s), diagnostic or therapeutic agent, paravertebral facet (zygapophyseal) joint (or nerves innervating that joint) with image guidance (fluoroscopy or CT), lumbar or sacral; second level (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1174596324
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
589
1972590263
Pain Management
506
1427031723
Pain Management
471
1619950995
Diagnostic Radiology
441
1265429427
Cardiac Electrophysiology
346
1235171745
Diagnostic Radiology
345
1477534758
Family Practice
319
1053394452
Internal Medicine
297
1275516569
Diagnostic Radiology
271
1841264736
Family Practice
223
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Hurdle has made to other doctors

Publications

Ultrasound-guided intra-articular knee injection in an obese patient. - American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation / Association of Academic Physiatrists
A 35-yr-old woman was referred to our outpatient clinic for a right intra-articular knee aspiration and injection. She had a medical history notable for lymphedema and morbid obesity (Fig. 1). Her body mass index was recently calculated at greater than 60 kg/m(2). She had a history of four previous nonguided knee joint injections performed elsewhere that provided no significant improvement in pain. On physical examination, it was difficult to localize common knee joint bony landmarks, including the medial and lateral borders of the patella (Fig. 2). Consequently we opted to utilize ultrasound guidance for the knee joint injection via the technique described herein.
Feasibility of ultrasound-guided percutaneous placement of peripheral nerve stimulation electrodes and anchoring during simulated movement: part two, upper extremity. - Regional anesthesia and pain medicine
Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) may provide analgesia for neuropathic pain syndromes in that nerve distribution. PNS electrode placement using ultrasound (US) guidance for upper extremity pain syndromes has not been reported. Existing anchoring technology may allow permanent implantation without significant migration.Three cadaver midhumeral fresh frozen upper extremity specimens were studied. US scanning was performed, targeting electrode placement at the radial, ulnar, and median nerves. Leads were anchored in the superficial fascia. The targeted nerves were exposed by careful dissection. Visual inspection for gross nerve damage, and electrode proximity to the nerve was performed. After confirmation of adequate lead placement, 2 extremities were sutured and placed in a continuous passive motion (CPM) machine for 21 hours to simulate activity. Each electrode was assessed for migration.Acceptable locations for US-guided electrode placement were: radial nerve approximately 10-14 cm superior to the lateral epicondyle; median nerve approximately 6 cm below the antecubital fossa; and ulnar nerve approximately 9 to 13 cm above the medial epicondyle. One electrode was placed at each site without difficulty. After careful exposure, visual inspection showed no gross nerve damage. Each electrode had at least 2 electrical contacts within 2 mm of the nerve sheath. At CPM termination, only the median nerve electrode on 1 cadaver extremity had migrated significantly.This new minimally invasive approach to lead placement requires further study to determine implantation criteria, optimal locations, anchoring techniques, and electrode design to define best clinical practice.
Accuracy of sonographically guided intra-articular injections in the native adult hip. - Journal of ultrasound in medicine : official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine
The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of sonographically guided intra-articular injections performed in the native adult hip using contrast-enhanced fluoroscopy as a reference standard.Twenty-eight consecutive patients (ages 32-91 years; mean, 68 years) referred to the pain clinic for intra-articular hip injections were recruited to participate. In each case, a 2- to 6-MHz curvilinear array transducer was used to place the needle into the hip joint at the femoral head-neck junction using an oblique sagittal approach. A contrast-enhanced fluoroscopic examination was then completed and assessed by an independent observer to determine needle placement accuracy. Once accurate placement was confirmed, the therapeutic injection proceeded.Thirty hip injections were completed in 15 women and 13 men (1 man and 1 woman received bilateral injections). The patients' body mass index (BMI) ranged from 20 to 39 kg/cm(2) (mean, 28 kg/cm(2)) and procedure time from initial scanning to injection averaged 112 seconds (range, 47-187 seconds). Overall, 97% of sonographically placed needles were accurate. The single inaccurate placement resulted from inadvertent needle withdrawal from the joint capsule during connection of the extension tubing for contrast agent injection in a young patient with a BMI of 28 kg/cm(2) and no hip effusion.Sonographic guidance can be used to inject the native adult hip joint with acceptable accuracy. When using the oblique sagittal approach, operators must be aware of the possibility of needle withdrawal from the joint due to the limited intra-articular space within the target region, particularly in the absence of effusion.
Accuracy of ultrasound-guided versus fluoroscopically guided contrast-controlled piriformis injections: a cadaveric study. - Journal of ultrasound in medicine : official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine
The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of ultrasound-guided piriformis injections with fluoroscopically guided contrast-controlled piriformis injections in a cadaveric model.Twenty piriformis muscles in 10 unembalmed cadavers were injected with liquid latex using both fluoroscopically guided contrast-controlled and US-guided injection techniques. All injections were performed by the same experienced individual. Two different colors of liquid latex were used to differentiate injection placement for each procedure, and the injection order was randomized. The gluteal regions were subsequently dissected by an individual blinded to the injection technique. Colored latex seen within the piriformis muscle, sheath, or both was considered an accurate injection.Nineteen of 20 ultrasound-guided injections (95%) correctly placed the liquid latex within the piriformis muscle, whereas only 6 of the 20 fluoroscopically guided contrast-controlled injections (30%) were accurate (P = .001). The liquid latex in 13 of the 14 missed fluoroscopically guided contrast-controlled piriformis injections and the single missed ultrasound-guided injection was found within the gluteus maximus muscle. In the single remaining missed fluoroscopically guided contrast-controlled piriformis injection, the liquid latex was found within the sciatic nerve.In this cadaveric model, ultrasound-guided piriformis injections were significantly more accurate than fluoroscopically guided contrast-controlled injections. Despite the use of bony landmarks and contrast, most of the fluoroscopically attempted piriformis injections were placed superficially within the gluteus maximus. Clinicians performing piriformis injections should be aware of the potential pitfalls of fluoroscopically guided contrast-controlled piriformis injections and consider using ultrasound guidance to ensure correct needle placement.
Ultrasound-guided intra-articular injection of the trapeziometacarpal joint: description of technique. - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
To describe a new technique to perform an ultrasound-guided intra-articular injection of the trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint.Ultrasound-guided injection of the TMC joint was completed on fresh frozen cadaver hand specimens using diatriazoate meglumine contrast. A fluoroscopic posteroanterior image of the TMC joint was then obtained to verify intra-articular placement of the contrast.Anatomy lab in a medical college.Seventeen fresh frozen cadaver hand specimens.Not applicable.Verification of this technique was confirmed using fluoroscopy and contrast.Sixteen (94%) of 17 joints injected showed contrast material within the TMC joint with a single cutaneous puncture. One intra-articular injection was initially misplaced into the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid joint.Ultrasound may be used to accurately perform intra-articular TMC injections. Ultrasound provides a viable alternative to fluoroscopy when accurate injection into the TMC joint is required for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
Ultrasound-guided piriformis injection: technique description and verification. - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
Piriformis injections are commonly used in the evaluation and treatment of patients presenting with buttock pain syndromes. Because of its small size, deep location, and relation to adjacent neurovascular structures, the piriformis is traditionally injected by using electromyographic, fluoroscopic, computed tomographic, or magnetic resonance imaging guidance. This report describes and verifies a technique for performing ultrasound-guided piriformis injections. Ultrasound offers several advantages over traditional imaging approaches, including accessibility, compact size, lack of ionizing radiation exposure, and direct visualization of neurovascular structures. With appropriate training and experience, interested physiatrists can consider implementing ultrasound-guided piriformis injections into their clinical practices.
Office-based ultrasound-guided intra-articular hip injection: technique for physiatric practice. - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
Intra-articular hip injections are commonly used in the evaluation and treatment of hip disorders. Although these injections are typically performed with fluoroscopic guidance, ultrasound provides a viable alternative for ensuring accurate intra-articular needle placement. This report describes the technique for performing ultrasound-guided intra-articular hip injections in the context of an office-based physiatric practice. Ultrasound offers several advantages over fluoroscopy, including accessibility, compact size, lack of ionizing radiation exposure, and visualization of neurovascular and other soft-tissue structures. With appropriate training and experience, interested physiatrists can consider implementing ultrasound-guided injections into their clinical practices.
Intrinsic spinal cord catheter placement: implications of new intractable pain in a patient with a spinal cord injury. - Anesthesia and analgesia
We present a case of new intractable flank pain after intrathecal infusion system placement in a 45-yr-old man with a history of a T12 spinal cord injury with dysesthetic leg pain. Pain after intrathecal infusion system placement was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and the catheter was found to be intraparenchymal. The patient was treated by cessation of infusion and surgical removal of the system. Before surgical removal, the pump was turned off and the patient's flank pain resolved. Increased vigilance is warranted when caring for paraplegic patients. When new pain persists, intrathecal medication tapering should be considered.
Ultrasound-Guided Spinal Procedures for Pain: A Review. - Physical medicine and rehabilitation clinics of North America
As the population ages, more patients are developing degenerative changes of the spine and associated pain. Although interventional procedures for axial and radicular spine pain have been available for decades, common imaging modalities have relied on ionizing radiation for guidance. Over the past decade, ultrasound has become increasingly popular to image both peripheral musculoskeletal and axial structures. This article reviews the use of ultrasound in the guidance of spine procedures, including cervical and lumbar facet injections and medial branch blocks, third occipital nerve blocks, thoracic facet and costotransverse joint injections, sacroiliac joint injections, and caudal and interlaminar epidural injections.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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4500 San Pablo Rd S Jacksonville, FL 32224
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13535 Beach Blvd
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 230-0087
4500 San Pablo Rd S
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000
4500 San Pablo Rd S
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000
4500 San Pablo Rd S
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000
4500 San Pablo Rd S Provider Enrollment
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000
4500 San Pablo Rd S
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000
4500 San Pablo Rd S
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000
4500 San Pablo Rd S
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000
4500 San Pablo Rd S
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000
4500 San Pablo Rd S Provider Enrollment Dept
Jacksonville, FL 32224
904 532-2000