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Dr. Daniel  Martinez  Md image

Dr. Daniel Martinez Md

618 Maco Drive
Harlingen TX 78550
956 250-0111
Medical School: University Of Iowa College Of Medicine - 1993
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: L8827
NPI: 1932135779
Taxonomy Codes:
208600000X 208G00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Daniel Martinez is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:33533 Description:Cabg arterial single Average Price:$6,000.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,705.14
HCPCS Code:33519 Description:Cabg artery-vein three Average Price:$2,321.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$537.58
HCPCS Code:33518 Description:Cabg artery-vein two Average Price:$1,443.06 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$406.02
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$569.11 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$188.73
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$565.64 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$190.46
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$292.30 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.68
HCPCS Code:36620 Description:Insertion catheter artery Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$49.97
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$115.77 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.10

HCPCS Code Definitions

33518
Coronary artery bypass, using venous graft(s) and arterial graft(s); 2 venous grafts (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
33519
Coronary artery bypass, using venous graft(s) and arterial graft(s); 3 venous grafts (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
36620
Arterial catheterization or cannulation for sampling, monitoring or transfusion (separate procedure); percutaneous
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
33533
Coronary artery bypass, using arterial graft(s); single arterial graft
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1871583526
Internal Medicine
1,592
1821045600
Nephrology
1,389
1841280005
Diagnostic Radiology
1,233
1689678187
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,200
1033113493
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,107
1548253560
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,090
1306841366
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,073
1528062973
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
616
1144275355
Internal Medicine
561
1356380885
Nephrology
485
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Martinez has made to other doctors

Publications

Constant mortality and fertility over age in Hydra. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Senescence, the increase in mortality and decline in fertility with age after maturity, was thought to be inevitable for all multicellular species capable of repeated breeding. Recent theoretical advances and compilations of data suggest that mortality and fertility trajectories can go up or down, or remain constant with age, but the data are scanty and problematic. Here, we present compelling evidence for constant age-specific death and reproduction rates in Hydra, a basal metazoan, in a set of experiments comprising more than 3.9 million days of observations of individual Hydra. Our data show that 2,256 Hydra from two closely related species in two laboratories in 12 cohorts, with cohort age ranging from 0 to more than 41 y, have extremely low, constant rates of mortality. Fertility rates for Hydra did not systematically decline with advancing age. This falsifies the universality of the theories of the evolution of aging that posit that all species deteriorate with age after maturity. The nonsenescent life history of Hydra implies levels of maintenance and repair that are sufficient to prevent the accumulation of damage for at least decades after maturity, far longer than the short life expectancy of Hydra in the wild. A high proportion of stem cells, constant and rapid cell turnover, few cell types, a simple body plan, and the fact that the germ line is not segregated from the soma are characteristics of Hydra that may make nonsenescence feasible. Nonsenescence may be optimal because lifetime reproduction may be enhanced more by extending adult life spans than by increasing daily fertility.
The Evolution and Utility of the Small-Carrion Prosthesis, Its Impact, and Progression to the Modern-Day Malleable Penile Prosthesis. - The journal of sexual medicine
Erectile dysfunction has plagued humanity for millennia. For years, treatment had been in the hands of mental health professionals. It was not until the 1970s that urologists created a modality that was marketable, reproducible, and consistently successful at treating impotence, the Small-Carrion Penile Prosthesis.We present the evolution of the malleable/semi-rigid penile prosthesis, concentrating our efforts reviewing and critiquing the pivotal article published by Drs. Michael P. Small, Hernan M. Carrion, and Julian A. Gordon. We then discuss its continued advancement, current-day utilization, and the future of the malleable prosthesis.From the early 1900s, surgeons have been toying with the idea of creating a penile implant. These initial attempts utilized rib cartilage, and eventually synthetic materials, including acrylic, silicone, and polyethylene.In 1975, Drs. Carrion and Small presented their initial experience of 31 patients utilizing their silicone implant. In their manuscript titled, "The Small-Carrion Penile Prosthesis: New Implant for the Management of Impotence," they discuss their technique, perioperative management of complications, and results.The malleable penile prosthesis continued to evolve throughout the years to the current day Genesis and Spectra. Although the current market is dominated by the inflatable penile prosthesis, there are specific situations where the malleable is ideally utilized. The pivotal article by Drs. Carrion and Small helped pave the way for the "New Era" of penile prosthetics and still remains one of the most impactful contributions to the management of erectile dysfunction. Martinez DR, Terlecki R, Brant WO. The Evolution and Utility of the Small-Carrion Prosthesis, Its Impact, and Progression to the Modern Day Malleable Penile Prosthesis. J Sex Med 2015;12(suppl 7):423-430.© 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.
NOTCH1, TP53, and MAP2K1 Mutations in Splenic Diffuse Red Pulp Small B-cell Lymphoma Are Associated With Progressive Disease. - The American journal of surgical pathology
Splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma (SDRPL) is considered an indolent neoplasm and its pathogenesis is not well known. We investigated the molecular characteristics of 19 SDRPL patients, 5 of them with progressive disease. IGHV genes were mutated in 9/13 (69%). Cytogenetic and molecular studies identified complex karyotypes in 2 cases, and IGH rearrangements in 3, with PAX5 and potentially TCL1 as partners in each one of them. Copy number arrays showed aberrations in 69% of the tumors, including recurrent losses of 10q23, 14q31-q32, and 17p13 in 3, and 9p21 in 2 cases. Deletion of 7q31.3-q32.3 was present in only 1 case and no trisomies 3 or 18 were detected. NOTCH1 and MAP2K1 were mutated in 2 cases each, whereas BRAF, TP53, and SF3B1 were mutated each in single cases. No mutations were found in NOTCH2 or MYD88. Four of the 5 patients with aggressive disease had mutations in NOTCH1 (2 cases), TP53 (1 case), and MAP2K1 (1 case). The progression-free survival of patients with mutated genes was significantly shorter than in the unmutated (P=0.011). These findings show that SDRPL share some mutated genes but not chromosomal alterations, with other splenic lymphomas, that may confer a more aggressive behavior.
Tolerance of Volume Control Noninvasive Ventilation in Subjects With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. - Respiratory care
Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) tolerance has been identified as an independent predictor of survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Volume control continuous mandatory ventilation (VC-CMV) NIV has been associated with poor tolerance. The aim of this study was to determine the tolerance of subjects with ALS to VC-CMV NIV.This was a prospective study involving subjects with ALS who were treated with VC-CMV NIV. Respiratory and functional parameters were recorded when the subjects began ventilatory support. NIV tolerance was evaluated after 3 months.Eighty-seven subjects with ALS were included. After 3 months, 80 subjects (92%) remained tolerant of NIV. Tolerant subjects presented greater survival (median 22.0 months, 95% CI 14.78-29.21) than intolerant subjects (median 6.0 months, 95% CI 0.86-11.13) (P = .03). The variables that best predicted NIV tolerance were mechanically assisted cough peak flow (P = .01) and percentage of time spent with SpO2 < 90% at night while on NIV (P = .03) CONCLUSIONS: VC-CMV NIV provides high rates of NIV tolerance in subjects with ALS. Mechanically assisted cough peak flow and percentage of time spent with SpO2 < 90% at night while using NIV are the 2 factors associated with tolerance of VC-CMV NIV in subjects with ALS.Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.
Paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis in hereditary spherocytosis with a concurrent follicular lymphoma: case report and review of the literature. - Diagnostic pathology
We report an unusual case of a 70-year-old male with history of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and secondary paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis with a concurrent follicular lymphoma. The lesion presented as a thoracic paraspinal mass of 9 cm, extending longitudinally between T6 and T9 vertebral bodies. Incisional biopsy revealed that this mass included mature hematopoietic tissue compatible with extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). The tissue also presented an extensive and diffuse infiltration by an atypical lymphoid population composed predominantly by small cells. The immunohistochemical study revealed that the atypical lymphoid population had a germinal center phenotype, consistent with the diffuse variant of follicular lymphoma (FL). The simultaneous presence of both EMH and FL in the same lesion made the interpretation and the final diagnosis of this case difficult. The presence of EMH in this clinical context may eclipse the diagnosis of the underlying lymphoproliferative neoplasm. The close association between the tumor cells and extramedullary hematopoietic tissue in the absence of lymphadenopathies or other tissue involvement suggests a relationship of this tumor with the recently described primary FL of the bone marrow.
Generation of a mouse model of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the central nervous system through combined deletion of Snf5 and p53. - Cancer research
Malignant rhabdoid tumors arise in several anatomic locations and are associated with poor outcomes. In the brain, these tumors are known as atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT). While genetically engineered models for malignant rhabdoid tumors exist, none of them recapitulate AT/RT, for which preclinical models remain lacking. In the majority of AT/RT, LOH occurs at the genetic locus SNF5 (Ini1/BAF47/Smarcb1), which functions as a subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex and a tumor suppressor in familial and sporadic malignant rhabdoid tumors. Therefore, we generated mice in which Snf5 was ablated specifically in nestin-positive and/or glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-positive progenitor cells of the developing central nervous system (CNS). Snf5 ablation in nestin-positive cells resulted in early lethality that could not be rescued by loss of p53. However, Snf5 ablation in GFAP-positive cells caused a neurodegenerative phenotype exacerbated by p53 loss. Notably, these double mutants exhibited AT/RT development, associated with an earlier failure in granule neuron migration in the cerebellum, reduced neuronal projections in the hippocampus, degeneration of the corpus callosum, and ataxia and seizures. Gene expression analysis confirmed that the tumors that arose in Snf5/p53 mutant mice were distinct from other neural tumors and most closely resembled human AT/RT. Our findings uncover a novel role for Snf5 in oligodendrocyte generation and survival, and they offer evidence of the first genetically engineered mouse model for AT/RT in the CNS.©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
Plasma cell and terminal B-cell differentiation in mantle cell lymphoma mainly occur in the SOX11-negative subtype. - Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
Mantle cell lymphoma is a mature lymphoid neoplasm characterized by the t(11;14)(q13;q32) and cyclin D1 overexpression. SOX11 is a transcription factor commonly overexpressed in these tumors but absent in most other mature B-cell lymphomas whose function is not well understood. Experimental studies have shown that silencing of SOX11 in mantle cell lymphoma cells promotes the shift from a mature B cell into an early plasmacytic differentiation phenotype, suggesting that SOX11 may contribute to tumor development by blocking the B-cell differentiation program. The relationship between SOX11 expression and terminal B-cell differentiation in primary mantle cell lymphoma and its relationship to the plasmacytic differentiation observed in occasional cases is not known. In this study we have investigated the terminal B-cell differentiation phenotype in 60 mantle cell lymphomas, 41 SOX11-positive and 19 SOX11-negative. Monotypic plasma cells and lymphoid cells with plasmacytic differentiation expressing cyclin D1 were observed in 7 (37%) SOX11-negative but in none of 41 SOX11-positive mantle cell lymphomas (P<0.001). Intense cytoplasmic expression of a restricted immunoglobulin light chain was significantly more frequent in SOX11-negative than -positive tumors (58 vs 13%) (P=0.001). Similarly, BLIMP1 and XBP1 expression was also significantly more frequent in SOX11-negative than in -positive cases (83 vs 34% and 75 vs 11%, respectively) (P=0.001). However, no differences in the expression of IRF4/MUM1 were observed among these subtypes of mantle cell lymphoma. In conclusion, these results indicate that SOX11-negative mantle cell lymphoma may be a particular subtype of this tumor characterized by more frequent morphological and immunophenotypic terminal B-cell differentiation features that may be facilitated by the absence of SOX11 transcription factor.
The Malleable Implant Salvage Technique: Infection Outcomes after Mulcahy Salvage Procedure and Replacement of Infected Inflatable Penile Prosthesis with Malleable Prosthesis. - The Journal of urology
Since its introduction in 1996 Mulcahy salvage has significantly improved outcomes for the removal and replacement of infected inflatable penile prostheses. Long-term followup data of Mulcahy salvage show an infection-free rate of 82%. A multicenter retrospective analysis of the malleable implant salvage technique was conducted to assess infection outcomes and the feasibility of conversion from malleable device back to inflatable penile prosthesis.This is a retrospective, institutional review board exempt, multi-institution study of 58 patients who underwent Mulcahy salvage with inflatable penile prosthesis removal and replacement with malleable prosthesis. Patient operative notes and charts were extensively reviewed to compile study data.Between 2002 and 2014 a total of 58 patients underwent infected inflatable penile prosthesis removal and replacement with a malleable prosthesis via Mulcahy salvage. Of these patients 54 (93%) have remained infection-free postoperatively. Average patient age was 56.4 years and average operative time was 148 minutes. Postoperative followup (as of May 2015) ranged from 1 month to 84 months. Of the 54 patients 37 retained the malleable prosthesis and 17 (31%) subsequently underwent replacement with an inflatable penile prosthesis. This occurred on average 6.7 months after Mulcahy salvage. Four patients had persistent infection after Mulcahy salvage with the malleable prosthesis and underwent explantation.This retrospective analysis of Mulcahy salvage procedure and replacement of inflatable penile prosthesis with malleable prosthesis shows a high infection-free rate. Additionally, 17 of the 54 patients who remained infection-free were able to successfully undergo subsequent removal of the malleable prosthesis and replacement with an inflatable penile prosthesis. Further prospective studies are needed to compare salvage with malleable vs inflatable penile prosthesis.Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Increased peripheral vascular resistance in male patients with traumatic lower limb amputation: one piece of the cardiovascular risk puzzle. - Blood pressure monitoring
The increased morbidity and mortality in traumatic lower limb amputees can be explained by the development of risk factors, among which high blood pressure plays an important role. However, the possible mechanisms underlying increased blood pressure levels observed in this population remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to test the hypothesis that peripheral vascular resistance is increased at rest in patients with traumatic lower limb amputation.In a cross-sectional study, eight patients with traumatic unilateral lower limb amputation (amputee group) and eight healthy individuals without amputation (control group) were included. Resting blood pressure, heart rate, and forearm blood flow were recorded simultaneously and thus, forearm vascular resistance was calculated.The amputee group showed higher systolic (126±2 vs. 118±5 mmHg, P<0.01), diastolic (78±2 vs. 63±3 mmHg, P<0.01), mean blood pressure (94±2 vs. 81±3 mmHg, P<0.01), and heart rate (74±5 vs. 65±8 bpm, P=0.02) compared with the control group. Despite the similar forearm blood flow response between groups, patients with traumatic lower limb amputation presented increased peripheral vascular resistance at rest compared with the control group (31.3±3.8 vs. 25.7±6.5 U, P=0.05).Patients with traumatic amputation present increased peripheral vascular resistance. Our findings clarify one possible mechanism underlying the higher blood pressure levels observed in this population.
A Novel Approach for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis with the GreenLightTM XPS Laser. - International braz j urol : official journal of the Brazilian Society of Urology
The treatment of pelvic malignancies with radiotherapy can develop severe sequelae, especially radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. It is a progressive disease that can lead to the need for blood transfusion, hospitalizations, and surgical interventions. This tends to affect the quality of life of these patients, and management can at times be difficult. We have evaluated the GreenLight Xcelerated Performance System (XPS) with TruCoag, although primarily used for management of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), for the treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.After International Review Board (IRB) approval, a retrospectivechart review was performed in addition to a literature search. A series of four male patients, mean age of 81 years, with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis secondary to radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies (3 prostate cancer, 1 rectal cancer) were successfully treated with the GreenLight laser after unsuccessful treatment with current therapies described in the literature.All four patients treated with the GreenLight laser had resolution of their hematuria after one treatment and were discharge from the hospital with clear urine.The GreenLight XPS laser shows promising results for the treatment of patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis, and deserves further evaluation and validation, especially since there is limited data available in the literature regarding the use of this technology for the treatment of this devastating condition.

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618 Maco Drive Harlingen, TX 78550
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