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Dr. Feng  Ge  Md image

Dr. Feng Ge Md

27 Centennial Dr
Peabody MA 01960
978 317-7677
Medical School: Other - 1986
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 80839
NPI: 1922004803
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Feng Ge is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:93306 Description:Tte w/doppler complete Average Price:$423.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$157.51
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$390.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$143.75
HCPCS Code:G0402 Description:Initial preventive exam Average Price:$390.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$160.39
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$307.25 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$107.19
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$218.18 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$72.56
HCPCS Code:G0180 Description:MD certification HHA patient Average Price:$172.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$54.54
HCPCS Code:69210 Description:Remove impacted ear wax Average Price:$135.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$52.92
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$92.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.77
HCPCS Code:G0101 Description:CA screen;pelvic/breast exam Average Price:$105.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$38.73
HCPCS Code:94010 Description:Breathing capacity test Average Price:$100.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$37.85
HCPCS Code:Q0091 Description:Obtaining screen pap smear Average Price:$105.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$46.46
HCPCS Code:99211 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$77.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.57
HCPCS Code:G0009 Description:Admin pneumococcal vaccine Average Price:$62.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.86
HCPCS Code:G0008 Description:Admin influenza virus vac Average Price:$62.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.86
HCPCS Code:85025 Description:Complete cbc w/auto diff wbc Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.02
HCPCS Code:G0439 Description:PPPS, subseq visit Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$115.06
HCPCS Code:Q2035 Description:Afluria vacc, 3 yrs & >, im Average Price:$45.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.54
HCPCS Code:84439 Description:Assay of free thyroxine Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.77
HCPCS Code:80061 Description:Lipid panel Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.07
HCPCS Code:80053 Description:Comprehen metabolic panel Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.29
HCPCS Code:83036 Description:Glycosylated hemoglobin test Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.75
HCPCS Code:96372 Description:Ther/proph/diag inj sc/im Average Price:$56.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.29
HCPCS Code:83540 Description:Assay of iron Average Price:$39.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.18
HCPCS Code:80076 Description:Hepatic function panel Average Price:$39.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.59
HCPCS Code:84520 Description:Assay of urea nitrogen Average Price:$33.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.69
HCPCS Code:82565 Description:Assay of creatinine Average Price:$33.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.96
HCPCS Code:80048 Description:Metabolic panel total ca Average Price:$39.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.98
HCPCS Code:84450 Description:Transferase (AST) (SGOT) Average Price:$33.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$5.60
HCPCS Code:84550 Description:Assay of blood/uric acid Average Price:$33.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$6.02
HCPCS Code:82947 Description:Assay glucose blood quant Average Price:$33.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$6.84
HCPCS Code:82270 Description:Occult blood feces Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.61
HCPCS Code:82043 Description:Microalbumin quantitative Average Price:$33.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.66
HCPCS Code:84443 Description:Assay thyroid stim hormone Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$23.80
HCPCS Code:84481 Description:Free assay (FT-3) Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$24.00
HCPCS Code:G0103 Description:PSA screening Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.06
HCPCS Code:82570 Description:Assay of urine creatinine Average Price:$27.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.33
HCPCS Code:81003 Description:Urinalysis auto w/o scope Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.18
HCPCS Code:84460 Description:Alanine amino (ALT) (SGPT) Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.39
HCPCS Code:J3420 Description:Vitamin b12 injection Average Price:$16.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$0.52
HCPCS Code:85610 Description:Prothrombin time Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$5.56
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$16.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00
HCPCS Code:90732 Description:Pneumococcal vaccine Average Price:$63.76 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$60.65

HCPCS Code Definitions

99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
69210
Removal impacted cerumen requiring instrumentation, unilateral
94010
Spirometry, including graphic record, total and timed vital capacity, expiratory flow rate measurement(s), with or without maximal voluntary ventilation
G0009
Administration of pneumococcal vaccine
G0180
Physician certification for medicare-covered home health services under a home health plan of care (patient not present), including contacts with home health agency and review of reports of patient status required by physicians to affirm the initial implementation of the plan of care that meets patient's needs, per certification period
G0103
Prostate cancer screening; prostate specific antigen test (psa)
99211
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, that may not require the presence of a physician or other qualified health care professional. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are minimal. Typically, 5 minutes are spent performing or supervising these services.
96372
Therapeutic, prophylactic, or diagnostic injection (specify substance or drug); subcutaneous or intramuscular
G0101
Cervical or vaginal cancer screening; pelvic and clinical breast examination
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
J3420
Injection, vitamin b-12 cyanocobalamin, up to 1000 mcg
Q0091
Screening papanicolaou smear; obtaining, preparing and conveyance of cervical or vaginal smear to laboratory
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
G0439
Annual wellness visit, includes a personalized prevention plan of service (pps), subsequent visit
G0008
Administration of influenza virus vaccine
93306
Echocardiography, transthoracic, real-time with image documentation (2D), includes M-mode recording, when performed, complete, with spectral Doppler echocardiography, and with color flow Doppler echocardiography
Q2035
Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (afluria)
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
G0402
Initial preventive physical examination; face-to-face visit, services limited to new beneficiary during the first 12 months of medicare enrollment

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1497751374
Endocrinology
3,639
1376569145
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
2,536
1609872571
Internal Medicine
1,509
1083672943
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,456
1689662504
Internal Medicine
1,446
1417939455
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,349
1902802879
Internal Medicine
1,258
1184646747
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
987
1467540328
Ophthalmology
967
1801842497
Diagnostic Radiology
865
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Ge has made to other doctors

Publications

Proteomics studies on stress responses in diatoms. - Proteomics
Diatoms are a highly diverse group of eukaryotic phytoplankton that are distributed throughout marine and freshwater environments and are believed to be responsible for approximately 40% of the total marine primary productivity. The ecological success of diatoms suggests that they have developed a range of strategies to cope with various biotic and abiotic stress factors. It is of great interest to understand the adaptive responses of diatoms to different stresses in the marine environment. Proteomic technologies have been applied to the adaptive responses of marine diatoms under different growth conditions in recent years such as nitrogen starvation, iron limitation and phosphorus deficiency. These studies have provided clues to elucidate the sophisticated sensing mechanisms that control their adaptive responses. Although only a very limited number of proteomic studies were conducted in diatoms, the obtained data have led to a better understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success. This review presents the current status of proteomic studies of diatom stress responses and discusses the novel developments and applications for the analysis of protein post-translational modification in diatoms. The potential future application of proteomics could contribute to a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms underlying diatom acclimation to a given stress and the acquisition of an enhanced diatom stress tolerance. Future challenges and research opportunities in the proteomics studies of diatoms are also discussed.© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
Effects of Phosphorylation of β Subunits of Phycocyanins on State Transition in the Model Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. - Plant & cell physiology
Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) is a model cyanobacterium and has been used extensively for studies concerned with photosynthesis and environmental adaptation. Although dozens of protein kinases and phosphatases with specificity for Ser/Thr/Tyr residues have been predicted, only a few substrate proteins are known in Synechocystis. In this study, we report 194 in vivo phosphorylation sites from 149 proteins in Synechocystis, which were identified using a combination of peptide pre-fractionation, TiO2 enrichment and liquid chromatograpy-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. These phosphorylated proteins are implicated in diverse biological processes, such as photosynthesis. Among all identified phosphoproteins involved in photosynthesis, the β subunits of phycocyanins (CpcBs) were found to be phosphorylated on Ser22, Ser49, Thr94 and Ser154. Four non-phosphorylated mutants were constructed by using site-directed mutagenesis. The in vivo characterization of the cpcB mutants showed a slower growth under high light irradiance and displayed fluorescence quenching to a lower level and less efficient energy transfer inside the phycobilisome (PBS). Notably, the non-phosphorylated mutants exhibited a slower state transition than the wild type. The current results demonstrated that the phosphorylation status of CpcBs affects the energy transfer and state transition of photosynthesis in Synechocystis. This study provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and may facilitate the elucidation of the entire regulatory network by linking kinases to their physiological substrates.© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Enhanced detection and comprehensive in situ phenotypic characterization of circulating and disseminated heteroploid epithelial and glioma tumor cells. - Oncotarget
Conventional strategy of anti-EpCAM capture and immunostaining of cytokeratins (CKs) to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is limited by highly heterogeneous and dynamic expression or absence of EpCAM and/or CKs in CTCs. In this study, a novel integrated cellular and molecular approach of subtraction enrichment (SE) and immunostaining-FISH (iFISH) was successfully developed. Both large or small size CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) in various biofluid samples including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cancer patients and patient-derived-xenograft (PDX) mouse models were efficiently enriched and comprehensively identified and characterized by SE-iFISH. Non-hematopoietic CTCs with heteroploid chromosome 8 were detected in 87-92% of lung, esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Characterization of CTCs performed by CK18-iFISH showed that CK18, the dual epithelial marker and tumor biomarker, was strong positive in only 14% of lung and 24% of esophageal CTCs, respectively. Unlike conventional methodologies restricted only to the large and/or both EpCAM and CK positive CTCs, SE-iFISH enables efficient enrichment and performing in situ phenotypic and karyotypic identification and characterization of the highly heterogeneous CTC subtypes classified by both chromosome ploidy and the expression of various tumor biomarkers. Each CTC subtype may possess distinct clinical significance relative to tumor metastasis, relapse, therapeutic drug sensitivity or resistance, etc.
Unique diversity of the venom peptides from the scorpion Androctonus bicolor revealed by transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. - Journal of proteomics
Androctonus bicolor is one of the most poisonous scorpion species in the world. However, little has been known about the venom composition of the scorpion. To better understand the molecular diversity and medical significance of the venom from the scorpion, we systematically analyzed the venom components by combining transcriptomic and proteomic surveys. Random sequencing of 1000 clones from a cDNA library prepared from the venom glands of the scorpion revealed that 70% of the total transcripts code for venom peptide precursors. Our efforts led to a discovery of 103 novel putative venom peptides. These peptides include NaTx-like, KTx-like and CaTx-like peptides, putative antimicrobial peptides, defensin-like peptides, BPP-like peptides, BmKa2-like peptides, Kunitz-type toxins and some new-type venom peptides without disulfide bridges, as well as many new-type venom peptides that are cross-linked with one, two, three, five or six disulfide bridges, respectively. We also identified three peptides that are identical to known toxins from scorpions. The venom was also analyzed using a proteomic technique. The presence of a total of 16 different venom peptides was confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The discovery of a wide range of new and new-type venom peptides highlights the unique diversity of the venom peptides from A. bicolor. These data also provide a series of novel templates for the development of therapeutic drugs for treating ion channel-associated diseases and infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens, and offer molecular probes for the exploration of structures and functions of various ion channels.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Proteomic analysis of post translational modifications in cyanobacteria. - Journal of proteomics
Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria and the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. Recently, cyanobacteria have attracted great interest due to their crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles and their ability to produce clean and renewable biofuels. To survive in various environmental conditions, cyanobacteria have developed a complex signal transduction network to sense environmental signals and implement adaptive changes. The post-translational modifications (PTMs) systems play important regulatory roles in the signaling networks of cyanobacteria. The systematic investigation of PTMs could contribute to the comprehensive description of protein species and to elucidate potential biological roles of each protein species in cyanobacteria. Although the proteomic studies of PTMs carried out in cyanobacteria were limited, these data have provided clues to elucidate their sophisticated sensing mechanisms that contribute to their evolutionary and ecological success. This review aims to summarize the current status of PTM studies and recent publications regarding PTM proteomics in cyanobacteria, and discuss the novel developments and applications for the analysis of PTMs in cyanobacteria. Challenges, opportunities and future perspectives in the proteomics studies of PTMs in cyanobacteria are also discussed.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
TrAmplification of Human Dental Follicle Cells by piggyBac Transposon - Mediated Reversible Immortalization System. - PloS one
Dental follicle cells (DFCs) are the precursor cells of periodontium. Under certain differentiation conditions, DFCs can be induced to differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic cells. However, DFCs has limited lifespan in vitro, so it's difficult to harvest enough cells for basic research and translational application. pMPH86 is a piggyBac transposon-mediated vector which contains SV40 T-Ag cassette that can be removed by flippase recognition target (FRT) recombinase. Here we demonstrated the pMPH86 can effectively amplify human DFCs through reversible immortalization. The immortalized DFCs (iDFCs) exhibit higher proliferate activity, which can be reversed to its original level before immortalization when deimmortalized by FLP recombinase. The iDFCs and deimmortalized DFCs (dDFCs) express most DFC markers and maintain multiple differentiation potential in vitro as they can be induced by BMP9 to differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic cells evidenced by gene expression and protein marker. We also proved telomerase activity of iDFCs are significantly increased and maintained at a high level, while the telomerase activity of primary DFCs was relatively low and decreased with every passage. After SV40 T-Ag was removed to deimmortalize the cells, telomerase activity was reduced to its original level before immortalization and decreased with passages just the same as primary DFCs. These results suggest that piggyBac immortalization system could be a potential strategy to amplify primary cells, which is critical for regenerative research and further clinical application.
A scanning-mode 2D shear wave imaging (s2D-SWI) system for ultrasound elastography. - Ultrasonics
Ultrasound elastography is widely used for the non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) is a quantitative method for assessing tissue stiffness. SWI has been demonstrated to be less operator dependent than quasi-static elastography, and has the ability to acquire quantitative elasticity information in contrast with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire two dimensional (2D) quantitative images of the tissue elasticity distribution. This study proposes and evaluates a scanning-mode 2D SWI (s2D-SWI) system. The hardware and image processing algorithms are presented in detail. Programmable devices are used to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. An analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transformation based shear wave speed determination method are proposed, which can be implemented using parallel computation. Imaging of tissue mimicking phantoms, and in vitro, and in vivo imaging test are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The s2D-SWI system represents a new choice for the quantitative mapping of tissue elasticity, and has great potential for implementation in commercial ultrasound scanners.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Characterization of competitive interactions in the coexistence of Bt-transgenic and conventional rice. - BMC biotechnology
Transgene flow through pollen and seeds leads to transgenic volunteers and feral populations in the nature, and consumer choice and economic incentives determine whether transgenic crops will be cultivated in the field. Transgenic and non-transgenic plants are likely to coexist in the field and natural habitats, but their competitive interactions are not well understood.Field experiments were conducted in an agricultural ecosystem with insecticide spraying and a natural ecosystem, using Bt-transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) and its non-transgenic counterpart in pure and mixed stands with a replacement series.Insect damage and competition significantly decreased plant growth and reproduction under the coexistence of transgenic and conventional rice. Insect-resistant transgenic rice was not competitively superior to its counterpart under different densities in both agricultural and natural ecosystems, irrespective of insect infection. Fitness cost due to Bt-transgene expression occurred only in an agroecosystem, where the population yield decreased with increasing percentage of transgenic rice. The population yield fluctuated in a natural ecosystem, with slight differences among pure and mixed stands under plant competition or insect pressure. The presence of Chilo suppressalis infection increased the number of non-target insects.Plant growth and reproduction patterns, relative competition ability and population yield indicate that Bt-transgenic and non-transgenic rice can coexist in agroecosystems, whereas in more natural habitats, transgenic rice is likely to outcompete non-transgenic rice.
Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel Insights into Mechanisms of Action of Long Noncoding RNA Hox Transcript Antisense Intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) in HeLa Cells. - Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP
Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which have emerged in recent years as a new and crucial layer of gene regulators, regulate various biological processes such as carcinogenesis and metastasis. HOTAIR (Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA), a lncRNA overexpressed in most human cancers, has been shown to be an oncogenic lncRNA. Here, we explored the role of HOTAIR in HeLa cells and searched for proteins regulated by HOTAIR. To understand the mechanism of action of HOTAIR from a systems perspective, we employed a quantitative proteomic strategy to systematically identify potential targets of HOTAIR. The expression of 170 proteins was significantly dys-regulated after inhibition of HOTAIR, implying that they could be potential targets of HOTAIR. Analysis of this data at the systems level revealed major changes in proteins involved in diverse cellular components, including the cytoskeleton and the respiratory chain. Further functional studies on vimentin (VIM), a key protein involved in the cytoskeleton, revealed that HOTAIR exerts its effects on migration and invasion of HeLa cells, at least in part, through the regulation of VIM expression. Inhibition of HOTAIR leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural alterations, suggesting a novel role of HOTAIR in maintaining mitochondrial function in cancer cells. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the function of HOTAIR in cancer cells. We expect that the methods used in this study will become an integral part of functional studies of lncRNAs.© 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
The effects of triazophos applied to transgenic Bt rice on the nutritional indexes, Nlvg expression, and population growth of Nilaparvata lugens Stål under elevated CO₂. - Pesticide biochemistry and physiology
The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), is a typical pest in which population resurgence can be induced by insecticides. Warmer global temperatures, associated with anthropogenic climate change, are likely to have marked ecological effects on terrestrial ecosystems. However, the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) concentrations on the resurgence of N. lugens that have been treated with pesticides used for transgenic Bt rice cultivation are not fully understood. The present study investigated changes in the protein content, soluble sugar content, free amino acid level, vitellogenin (Nlvg) mRNA expression, and the population growth of N. lugens on transgenic Bt rice (TT51) following triazaophos foliar spray under conditions of eCO2. The results showed that the protein content in the fat bodies and ovaries of N. lugens adult females in TT51 treated with 40 ppm triazophos under eCO2 was significantly higher than under ambient CO2 (aCO2) and was also higher than that in females feeding on the non-transgenic parent (MH63) under aCO2 at different days after emergence (DAEs). The soluble sugar content and free amino level of adult females in TT51 treated with 40 ppm triazophos under eCO2 was significantly higher than under aCO2 and was also higher than in MH63 under aCO2 at 1 and 3 DAE. The Nlvg mRNA expression level of N. lugens adult females in TT51 treated with 40 ppm triazophos under eCO2 was significantly higher than under aCO2 and was also higher than in MH63 under aCO2 at 1 and 3 DAE. The population number of N. lugens in TT51 treated with 40 ppm triazophos under eCO2 was significantly higher than under aCO2 and was also higher than in MH63 under aCO2. The present findings provide important information for integrated pest management with transgenic varieties and a better understanding of the resurgence mechanism of N. lugens under eCO2.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Map & Directions

27 Centennial Dr Peabody, MA 01960
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