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Dr. Nicole  Hackman  Md image

Dr. Nicole Hackman Md

500 University Dr H088
Hershey PA 17033
717 318-8006
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: MD439900
NPI: 1912109158
Taxonomy Codes:
208000000X

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Publications

Preparing for Antibiotic Resistance Campaigns: A Person-Centered Approach to Audience Segmentation. - Journal of health communication
Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat to public health that calls for urgent attention. However, creating campaigns to slow the emergence and spread of drug-resistant pathogens is challenging because the goal-antibiotic stewardship-encompasses multiple behaviors. This study provided a novel approach to audience segmentation for a multifaceted goal, by using a person-centered approach to identify profiles of U.S. adults based on shared stewardship intentions. The latent class analysis identified three groups: stewards, stockers, and demanders. The findings suggest campaigns with goals aimed at encouraging stewards to follow through on their intentions, encouraging stockers to dispose of their leftover antibiotics, and convincing demanders to accept providers' evidence-based judgment when a prescription for antibiotics is not indicated. Covariate analysis showed that people who held more inaccurate beliefs about what antibiotics can treat had higher odds of being demanders and stockers instead of stewards. People with stronger health mavenism also had higher odds of being stockers instead of stewards. The covariate analysis provided theoretical insight into the strategies to pursue in campaigns targeting these 3 groups.
Breastfeeding outcome comparison by parity. - Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine
Anecdotally, breastfeeding experiences differ between those who have previously nursed an infant and those who are primiparous. This analysis contrasted breastfeeding outcomes between primiparous women and those with previous experience spanning from maternity stay through 6 months postpartum.A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in a randomized, controlled trial with mothers and "well" newborns ≥34 weeks of gestation comparing two post-hospital discharge care models. Mothers completed an in-person interview during the postpartum stay and phone surveys at 2 weeks, 2 months, and 6 months where questionnaires related to breastfeeding were completed. All participants intended to breastfeed. Chi-squared and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to test for differences between parity groups. Breastfeeding duration by parity group was compared using a Kaplan-Meier plot and a logrank test. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the relationship between breastfeeding duration and parity after adjusting for covariates.Among 1,099 mothers available for analysis, 542 (49%) were primiparous. Multiparous mothers had a longer intended breastfeeding duration (median, 9 vs. 6 months; p<0.001). Following delivery, primiparous mothers had a longer median time to first breastfeeding attempt (119 vs. 96 minutes; p<0.001) and were more likely to have eight or fewer feeding attempts in the first 24 hours (33% vs. 44%; p<0.001)). More primiparous women reported early breastfeeding problems (35% vs. 20%; p<0.001) and mixed feeding at hospital discharge (39% vs. 23%; p<0.001) despite reporting less breastfeeding-associated pain during the first week (p=0.04). Multiparous women were more likely to breastfeed through 6 months (p<0.001). In a multivariable Cox model for breastfeeding duration, an interaction existed between intended breastfeeding duration and parity (p=0.006); among those intending to breastfeed for 12 months, multiparous mothers had a significantly lower hazard of stopping breastfeeding (hazard ratio=0.66; p=0.03) than primiparous mothers.Women who have breastfed previously have significantly different breastfeeding experiences than primiparous women. Pre- and postdelivery breastfeeding support should differentially target primiparous women to improve breastfeeding outcomes.
Compliance of middle school-aged babysitters in central Pennsylvania with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices. - Clinical pediatrics
To determine the compliance of middle school-aged babysitters with national recommendations for emergency preparedness and safety practices.A prospective, self-administered questionnaire-based study was conducted at 3 middle schools in central Pennsylvania.A total of 1364 questionnaires were available for analysis. Responding babysitters (n = 890) reported previous training that included babysitter (21%), first aid (64%), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%) training. Reported unsafe babysitter practices were leaving a child unattended (36%) and opening the door to a stranger (24%). The most common emergency experience encountered by responding babysitters included cut or scrape (83%), burns (28%), and choking (14%). Ten percent of responding babysitters have activated the 911 system.Middle school-aged babysitters will likely encounter common household emergencies and therefore benefit from first aid training; however, very little difference in safety knowledge was found between trained and untrained babysitters, suggesting modifications in babysitter training programs may be required.

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500 University Dr H088 Hershey, PA 17033
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