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Dr. Michael  Taylor  Md image

Dr. Michael Taylor Md

450 Stanyan St St. Mary's Medical Center Dept. Of Radiology Rm114-A
San Francisco CA 94117
415 505-5770
Medical School: University Of Florida College Of Medicine - 1995
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1902892102
Taxonomy Codes:
2085R0204X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Michael Taylor is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:35476 Description:Repair venous blockage Average Price:$1,148.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$288.13
HCPCS Code:71260 Description:Ct thorax w/dye Average Price:$355.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$62.85
HCPCS Code:70450 Description:Ct head/brain w/o dye Average Price:$291.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$44.59
HCPCS Code:72131 Description:Ct lumbar spine w/o dye Average Price:$292.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$52.22
HCPCS Code:93880 Description:Extracranial study Average Price:$264.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$33.24
HCPCS Code:75978 Description:Repair venous blockage Average Price:$238.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$29.03
HCPCS Code:74177 Description:Ct abd & pelv w/contrast Average Price:$305.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$97.79
HCPCS Code:74176 Description:Ct abd & pelvis Average Price:$290.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$93.48
HCPCS Code:78452 Description:Ht muscle image spect mult Average Price:$270.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$86.83
HCPCS Code:93970 Description:Extremity study Average Price:$204.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$37.15
HCPCS Code:72148 Description:Mri lumbar spine w/o dye Average Price:$244.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$79.82
HCPCS Code:77012 Description:Ct scan for needle biopsy Average Price:$208.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$62.93
HCPCS Code:71275 Description:Ct angiography chest Average Price:$219.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.34
HCPCS Code:93971 Description:Extremity study Average Price:$136.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$24.53
HCPCS Code:76942 Description:Echo guide for biopsy Average Price:$122.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$37.19
HCPCS Code:76770 Description:Us exam abdo back wall comp Average Price:$123.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.67
HCPCS Code:74230 Description:Cine/vid x-ray throat/esoph Average Price:$111.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$29.12
HCPCS Code:76700 Description:Us exam abdom complete Average Price:$123.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$44.61
HCPCS Code:77080 Description:Dxa bone density axial Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.45
HCPCS Code:73562 Description:X-ray exam of knee 3 Average Price:$65.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.80
HCPCS Code:73564 Description:X-ray exam knee 4 or more Average Price:$65.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.18
HCPCS Code:76775 Description:Us exam abdo back wall lim Average Price:$83.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$31.51
HCPCS Code:76705 Description:Echo exam of abdomen Average Price:$83.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$31.54
HCPCS Code:73030 Description:X-ray exam of shoulder Average Price:$59.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.80
HCPCS Code:73520 Description:X-ray exam of hips Average Price:$63.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$15.11
HCPCS Code:77001 Description:Fluoroguide for vein device Average Price:$61.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.87
HCPCS Code:72110 Description:X-ray exam of lower spine Average Price:$57.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$17.39
HCPCS Code:74020 Description:X-ray exam of abdomen Average Price:$54.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$14.66
HCPCS Code:76937 Description:Us guide vascular access Average Price:$48.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$16.57
HCPCS Code:71020 Description:Chest x-ray Average Price:$42.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.89
HCPCS Code:73630 Description:X-ray exam of foot Average Price:$39.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.16
HCPCS Code:73510 Description:X-ray exam of hip Average Price:$42.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.36
HCPCS Code:73110 Description:X-ray exam of wrist Average Price:$38.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.62
HCPCS Code:73610 Description:X-ray exam of ankle Average Price:$38.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.62
HCPCS Code:72100 Description:X-ray exam of lower spine Average Price:$41.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.72
HCPCS Code:71010 Description:Chest x-ray Average Price:$34.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.98
HCPCS Code:73620 Description:X-ray exam of foot Average Price:$31.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.33
HCPCS Code:73590 Description:X-ray exam of lower leg Average Price:$32.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.62
HCPCS Code:72170 Description:X-ray exam of pelvis Average Price:$32.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.97
HCPCS Code:74000 Description:X-ray exam of abdomen Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.98
HCPCS Code:73560 Description:X-ray exam of knee 1 or 2 Average Price:$29.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.43

HCPCS Code Definitions

74020
Radiologic examination, abdomen; complete, including decubitus and/or erect views
73110
Radiologic examination, wrist; complete, minimum of 3 views
74000
Radiologic examination, abdomen; single anteroposterior view
73620
Radiologic examination, foot; 2 views
73610
Radiologic examination, ankle; complete, minimum of 3 views
73630
Radiologic examination, foot; complete, minimum of 3 views
77012
Computed tomography guidance for needle placement (eg, biopsy, aspiration, injection, localization device), radiological supervision and interpretation
73030
Radiologic examination, shoulder; complete, minimum of 2 views
74176
Computed tomography, abdomen and pelvis; without contrast material
72170
Radiologic examination, pelvis; 1 or 2 views
72148
Magnetic resonance (eg, proton) imaging, spinal canal and contents, lumbar; without contrast material
73510
Radiologic examination, hip, unilateral; complete, minimum of 2 views
76937
Ultrasound guidance for vascular access requiring ultrasound evaluation of potential access sites, documentation of selected vessel patency, concurrent realtime ultrasound visualization of vascular needle entry, with permanent recording and reporting (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
76942
Ultrasonic guidance for needle placement (eg, biopsy, aspiration, injection, localization device), imaging supervision and interpretation
73564
Radiologic examination, knee; complete, 4 or more views
72131
Computed tomography, lumbar spine; without contrast material
73562
Radiologic examination, knee; 3 views
72110
Radiologic examination, spine, lumbosacral; minimum of 4 views
71010
Radiologic examination, chest; single view, frontal
70450
Computed tomography, head or brain; without contrast material
73560
Radiologic examination, knee; 1 or 2 views
74230
Swallowing function, with cineradiography/videoradiography
35476
Transluminal balloon angioplasty, percutaneous; venous
73520
Radiologic examination, hips, bilateral, minimum of 2 views of each hip, including anteroposterior view of pelvis
76775
Ultrasound, retroperitoneal (eg, renal, aorta, nodes), real time with image documentation; limited
76770
Ultrasound, retroperitoneal (eg, renal, aorta, nodes), real time with image documentation; complete
76705
Ultrasound, abdominal, real time with image documentation; limited (eg, single organ, quadrant, follow-up)
75978
Transluminal balloon angioplasty, venous (eg, subclavian stenosis), radiological supervision and interpretation
76700
Ultrasound, abdominal, real time with image documentation; complete
72100
Radiologic examination, spine, lumbosacral; 2 or 3 views
71275
Computed tomographic angiography, chest (noncoronary), with contrast material(s), including noncontrast images, if performed, and image postprocessing
71020
Radiologic examination, chest, 2 views, frontal and lateral
93971
Duplex scan of extremity veins including responses to compression and other maneuvers; unilateral or limited study
71260
Computed tomography, thorax; with contrast material(s)
93970
Duplex scan of extremity veins including responses to compression and other maneuvers; complete bilateral study
74177
Computed tomography, abdomen and pelvis; with contrast material(s)
73590
Radiologic examination; tibia and fibula, 2 views
93880
Duplex scan of extracranial arteries; complete bilateral study
78452
Myocardial perfusion imaging, tomographic (SPECT) (including attenuation correction, qualitative or quantitative wall motion, ejection fraction by first pass or gated technique, additional quantification, when performed); multiple studies, at rest and/or stress (exercise or pharmacologic) and/or redistribution and/or rest reinjection
77001
Fluoroscopic guidance for central venous access device placement, replacement (catheter only or complete), or removal (includes fluoroscopic guidance for vascular access and catheter manipulation, any necessary contrast injections through access site or catheter with related venography radiologic supervision and interpretation, and radiographic documentation of final catheter position) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
77080
Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bone density study, 1 or more sites; axial skeleton (eg, hips, pelvis, spine)

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1275571523
Diagnostic Radiology
1,409
1366490120
Internal Medicine
1,265
1043393663
Pulmonary Disease
1,218
1548220304
Internal Medicine
1,167
1730138876
Diagnostic Radiology
1,156
1265470520
Diagnostic Radiology
1,147
1083674550
Nephrology
1,133
1023182227
Nephrology
1,111
1952404253
Nephrology
1,013
1679653711
Pulmonary Disease
918
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Taylor has made to other doctors

Publications

MRI spectrum of Succinate Dehydrogenase-related infantile leukoencephalopathy. - Annals of neurology
Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient leukoencephalopathy is a complex II-related mitochondrial disorder for which the clinical phenotype, neuroimaging pattern and genetic findings have not been comprehensively reviewed.19 individuals with succinate dehydrogenase deficiency-related leukoencephalopathy were reviewed for neuroradiologic, clinical and genetic findings as part of Institutional Review Board approved studies at Children's National Health System (Washington, DC) and VU University Medical Center (Amsterdam, NL).All individuals had signal abnormalities in the central corticospinal tracts and spinal cord where imaging was available. Other typical findings were involvement of the cerebral hemispheric white matter with sparing of the U fibers, the corpus callosum with sparing of the outer blades, the basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellar white matter, and elevated succinate on MRS. The thalamus was involved in most studies with a predilection for the anterior nucleus, pulvinar and geniculate bodies. Clinically, infantile-onset neurological regression with partial recovery and subsequent stabilization was typical. All individuals had mutations in SDHA, SDHB or SDHAF1, or proven biochemical defect.Succinate dehydrogenase deficiency is a rare leukoencephalopathy, for which improved recognition by MRI in combination with advanced sequencing technologies allows non-invasive diagnostic confirmation. The MRI pattern is characterized by cerebral hemispheric white matter abnormalities with sparing of the U fibers, corpus callosum involvement with sparing of the outer blades, and involvement of corticospinal tracts, thalami and spinal cord. In individuals with infantile regression and this pattern of MRI abnormalities, the differential diagnosis should include succinate dehydrogenase deficiency, in particular if MRS shows elevated succinate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.© 2015 American Neurological Association.
MLL5 Orchestrates a Cancer Self-Renewal State by Repressing the Histone Variant H3.3 and Globally Reorganizing Chromatin. - Cancer cell
Mutations in the histone 3 variant H3.3 have been identified in one-third of pediatric glioblastomas (GBMs), but not in adult tumors. Here we show that H3.3 is a dynamic determinant of functional properties in adult GBM. H3.3 is repressed by mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) in self-renewing GBM cells. MLL5 is a global epigenetic repressor that orchestrates reorganization of chromatin structure by punctuating chromosomes with foci of compacted chromatin, favoring tumorigenic and self-renewing properties. Conversely, H3.3 antagonizes self-renewal and promotes differentiation. We exploited these epigenetic states to rationally identify two small molecules that effectively curb cancer stem cell properties in a preclinical model. Our work uncovers a role for MLL5 and H3.3 in maintaining self-renewal hierarchies in adult GBM.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Successful treatment of primary intracranial sarcoma with the ICE chemotherapy regimen and focal radiation in children. - Journal of neurosurgery. Pediatrics
OBJECT Primary CNS sarcomas are very rare pediatric tumors with no defined standard of care. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of children diagnosed with a primary CNS sarcoma and treated at 2 Canadian tertiary care centers between 1995 and 2012. This report focuses on patients with cerebral hemispheric tumor location due to their specific clinical presentation. RESULTS Fourteen patients with nonmetastatic primary CNS sarcoma were identified; in 9 patients, tumors were located in the cerebral hemisphere and 7 of these patients presented with intratumoral hemorrhage. One infant who died of progressive disease postoperatively before receiving any adjuvant therapy was not included in this study. The final cohort therefore included 8 patients (4 males). Median patient age at diagnosis was 11.8 years (range 5.8-17 years). All tumors were located in the right hemisphere. Duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was very short with a median of 2 days (range 3-7 days), except for 1 patient. Three (37.5%) patients had an underlying diagnosis of neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Gross-total resection was achieved in 5 patients. The dose of focal radiation therapy (RT) ranged between 54 Gy and 60 Gy. Concomitant etoposide was administered during RT. ICE (ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide) chemotherapy was administered prior to and after RT for a total of 6-8 cycles. Seven of the 8 patients were alive at a median time of 4.9 years (range 1.9-17.9 years) after treatment. CONCLUSIONS In this retrospective series, patients with primary CNS sarcomas located in the cerebral hemisphere most commonly presented with symptomatic acute intratumoral hemorrhage. Patients with NF1 were overrepresented. The combination of adjuvant ICE chemotherapy and focal RT provided encouraging outcomes.
Total Transformation: How ACA Is Driving Changes in the Provider Landscape. - Benefits quarterly
Motivated by Affordable Care Act provisions designed to put the brakes on rapidly increasing health care costs, employers are adopting numerous strategies for creating greater efficiency in how they purchase health care. The strategies are centered on holding providers more accountable for improving patient outcomes and reducing unnecessary expenses. In conjunction with the federal agency for health care, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), they will drastically transform the provider landscape. This article discusses those strategies, along with their potential impact on providers.
Characterization of novel biomarkers in selecting for subtype specific medulloblastoma phenotypes. - Oncotarget
Major research efforts have focused on defining cell surface marker profiles for characterization and selection of brain tumor stem/progenitor cells. Medulloblastoma is the most common primary malignant pediatric brain cancer and consists of 4 molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4. Given the heterogeneity within and between medulloblastoma variants, surface marker profiles may be subtype-specific. Here, we employed a high throughput flow cytometry screen to identify differentially expressed cell surface markers in self-renewing vs. non-self-renewing SHH medulloblastoma cells. The top 25 markers were reduced to 4, CD271/p75NTR/NGFR, CD106/VCAM1, EGFR and CD171/NCAM-L1, by evaluating transcript levels in SHH tumors relative to samples representing the other variants. However, only CD271/p75NTR/NGFR and CD171/NCAM-L1 maintain differential expression between variants at the protein level. Functional characterization of CD271, a low affinity neurotrophin receptor, in cell lines and primary cultures suggested that CD271 selects for lower self-renewing progenitors or stem cells. Moreover, CD271 levels were negatively correlated with expression of SHH pathway genes. Our study reveals a novel role for CD271 in SHH medulloblastoma and suggests that targeting CD271 pathways could lead to the design of more selective therapies that lessen the broad impact of current treatments on developing nervous systems.
Using Improvement Methodology to Optimize Echocardiographic Imaging of Coronary Arteries in Children. - Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography : official publication of the American Society of Echocardiography
According to the American Society of Echocardiography, coronary artery (CA) imaging is recommended in pediatric examinations to identify CA anomalies. A review of the authors' center's echocardiographic studies revealed that CA images were often nondiagnostic. The aim of this study was to utilize quality improvement methodology to increase the percentage of first-time pediatric studies with definitive CA identification from a baseline of 45% to a goal of at least 75% in 9 months.A scoring system was developed to characterize the completeness of CA imaging. One point was scored for demonstration of each of the following: right CA origin by two-dimensional imaging, right CA origin by color flow Doppler imaging, left CA origin by two-dimensional imaging, and left CA origin by color flow Doppler imaging. A score of 4 was considered to represent definitive imaging. A baseline was obtained on 100 first-time echocardiograms with normal findings. During the intervention, 10 randomly selected first-time studies with normal findings were scored weekly for assessment of CA imaging. Interventions were focused on the following domains: excellence in image quality, shared ownership, transparency, and effective communication. Key interventions included labeling CA images, requiring two-dimensional and color Doppler images, optimization of settings, and elimination of macros for CA reporting.The percentage of definitive CA identification increased from 45% to 82.5% over 4 months and was sustained for 7 months. Accurate reporting of incomplete CA imaging increased from 17% to 77.5%.Improved pediatric CA imaging and reporting were achieved through the implementation of key interventions.Copyright © 2015 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
A novel, element-based approach for the objective classification of bloodstain patterns. - Forensic science international
The classification of bloodstain patterns has been identified as a challenging part of bloodstain pattern analysis due to the lack of a widely accepted and well-defined methodology and the ambiguity often associated with examining bloodstain patterns. The main aim of this study was to develop an objective, science-based method, for classifying bloodstain patterns, through the development of common language that could be used by BPA experts to describe the appearance of the pattern. This novel approach encourages a shift in the mindset of a BPA analyst by bringing them 'back to the basics' by treating components of a bloodstain pattern as discrete, observable and measurable units. One of the principal problems with current pattern classification methods is that pattern types are generally described in terms of the mechanism of pattern formation rather than grouping according to observable pattern characteristics. This study extends current BPA classification methodologies by developing and validating mechanism-free nomenclature that arises from observing and documenting the physical characteristics of bloodstain patterns. Following the grouping of bloodstain components on the basis of their physical characteristics, the formation evolution of these components is then investigated using concepts drawn from the fluid-dynamics of bloodstain pattern formation. This study offers a promising approach to distinguishing between different bloodstain pattern types through the use of visual aids in the form of colour maps, high-speed video and static digital images.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
The Amazing and Deadly Glioma Race. - Cancer cell
In this issue of Cancer Cell, studies from Mazor and colleagues and Kim and colleagues use a combination of epigenetic and genetic approaches to reveal a complex evolutionary process underlying two of the biggest challenges facing neuro-oncology, specifically glioblastoma malignant progression and treatment resistance.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Poly-ADP-Ribose Polymerase as a Therapeutic Target in Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma and Pediatric High-Grade Astrocytoma. - Molecular cancer therapeutics
Pediatric high-grade astrocytomas (pHGA) and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) are devastating malignancies for which no effective therapies exist. We investigated the therapeutic potential of PARP1 inhibition in preclinical models of pHGA and DIPG. PARP1 levels were characterized in pHGA and DIPG patient samples and tumor-derived cell lines. The effects of PARP inhibitors veliparib, olaparib, and niraparib as monotherapy or as radiosensitizers on cell viability, DNA damage, and PARP1 activity were evaluated in a panel of pHGA and DIPG cell lines. Survival benefit of niraparib was examined in an orthotopic xenograft model of pHGA. About 85% of pHGAs and 76% of DIPG tissue microarray samples expressed PARP1. Six of 8 primary cell lines highly expressed PARP1. Interestingly, across multiple cell lines, some PARP1 protein expression was required for response to PARP inhibition; however, there was no correlation between protein level or PARP1 activity and sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Niraparib was the most effective at reducing cell viability and proliferation (MTT and Ki67). Niraparib induced DNA damage (γH2AX foci) and induced growth arrest. Pretreatment of pHGA cells with a sublethal dose of niraparib (1 μmol/L) before 2 Gy of ionizing radiation (IR) decreased the rate of DNA damage repair, colony growth, and relative cell number. Niraparib (50 mg/kg) inhibited PARP1 activity in vivo and extended survival of mice with orthotopic pHGA xenografts, when administered before IR (20 Gy, fractionated), relative to control mice (40 vs. 25 days). Our data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that niraparib may be an effective radiosensitizer for pHGA and DIPG. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(11); 2560-8. ©2015 AACR.©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
Posterior fossa ependymoma: current insights. - Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Ependymoma is the third most common malignant tumor of the posterior fossa and is a major cause of neurological morbidity and mortality in children. Current treatments, particularly surgery and external beam irradiation result in relatively poor outcomes with significant neurological and cognitive sequelae from treatment. Historical approaches have considered all ependymomas as similar entities based on their morphological appearance.Recent advances in genomics and epigenetics have revealed, however, that ependymomas from different CNS locations represent distinct entities. Moreover, ependymoma of the posterior fossa, the most common location in children, is actually comprised of two distinct molecular variants. These two variants have marked differences in demographics, transcriptomes, structure, methylation patterns, and clinical outcomes. This allows for the development of new biology-based clinical risk stratification, which can both prioritize patients for de-escalation of therapy and identify those who will benefit from novel therapeutic strategies. Indeed, the identification of these two variants allows an opportunity for robust preclinical modeling for development of novel therapeutic strategies.Herein, we have summarized our current clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment of posterior fossa ependymoma, recent advances in understanding the biology of posterior fossa ependymoma and how these new insights can be translated into the clinic to form the basis of the next generation of clinical trials.

Map & Directions

450 Stanyan St St. Mary's Medical Center Dept. Of Radiology Rm114-A San Francisco, CA 94117
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