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Dr. Kelly  Knupp  Md image

Dr. Kelly Knupp Md

13123 E 16Th Ave
Aurora CO 80045
720 776-6895
Medical School: University Of New Mexico School Of Medicine - 1997
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 44025
NPI: 1902859242
Taxonomy Codes:
2080P0008X

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Publications

Surgery for infants with catastrophic epilepsy: an analysis of complications and efficacy. - Child's nervous system : ChNS : official journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Infants with epilepsy often have a catastrophic course. There is a reluctance to operate in the very young, due to the perception of an unacceptable risk of morbidity with early operations. The purpose of this investigation was to better characterize the efficacy and safety of epilepsy surgery in infants.Epilepsy operations performed on children under 1 year old, between 2002 and 2013, were reviewed for demographic information, epilepsy characteristics, surgical approach, outcomes, and surgical complications.Twenty-five patients, ages 11 days to 11.5 months (mean 4.7) at operation, were identified. All had daily seizures. Twenty-two (88 %) had an abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen (64 %) patients underwent hemispherotomy at initial operation. Seven (28 %) infants had grid placement followed by focal resection. Focal cortical dysplasia was the most common pathology (40 %) followed by hemimegalencephaly (32 %). Complications occurred in 36 % of patients. These included hydrocephalus in five patients (20 %). Two patients had significant intra-operative complications which required unplanned staging of their operations. Both recovered without permanent injury. Mean follow-up was 62.4 months. Twenty patients (80 %) are seizure-free, and 10 (40 %) are off anticonvulsant medication. Two patients are Engel class 2, and the remaining three patients were Engel class 4, one of whom died with status epilepticus from the contralateral hemisphere.Infants with localization-related catastrophic epilepsy can have excellent outcomes from early epilepsy surgery. Complications are common in this patient group and proper diagnosis can be challenging. Young age should not exclude infants with catastrophic epilepsy from consideration for early surgical intervention.
Parental reporting of response to oral cannabis extracts for treatment of refractory epilepsy. - Epilepsy & behavior : E&B
Oral cannabis extracts (OCEs) have been used in the treatment of epilepsy; however, no studies demonstrate clear efficacy. We report on a cohort of pediatric patients with epilepsy who were given OCE and followed in a single tertiary epilepsy center.A retrospective chart review of children and adolescents who were given OCE for treatment of their epilepsy was performed.Seventy-five patients were identified of which 57% reported any improvement in seizure control and 33% reported a >50% reduction in seizures (responders). If the family had moved to CO for OCE treatment, the responder rate was 47% vs. 22% for children who already were in CO. The responder rate varied based on epilepsy syndrome: Dravet 23%, Doose 0%, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) 88.9%. The background EEG of the 8 responders where EEG data were available was not improved. Additional benefits reported included: improved behavior/alertness (33%), improved language (10%), and improved motor skills (10%). Adverse events (AEs) occurred in 44% of patients including increased seizures (13%) and somnolence/fatigue (12%). Rare adverse events included developmental regression, abnormal movements, status epilepticus requiring intubation, and death.Our retrospective study of OCE use in pediatric patients with epilepsy demonstrates that some families reported patient improvement with treatment; however, we also found a variety of challenges and possible confounding factors in studying OCE retrospectively in an open-labeled fashion. We strongly support the need for controlled, blinded studies to evaluate the efficacy and safety of OCE for treatment of pediatric epilepsies using accurate seizure counts, formal neurocognitive assessments, as well as EEG as a biomarker. This study provides Class III evidence that OCE is well tolerated by children and adolescents with epilepsy.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Progressive myoclonic epilepsies: it takes a village to make a diagnosis. - Neurology
The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a devastating group of rare disorders(1) that manifest with increasing action myoclonus, which is also present at rest but activates with stimuli such as noise, light, or touch. Ultimately, patients become wheelchair-bound and experience early death. Neurologic signs that frequently but not reliably coexist include other seizure types (particularly generalized tonic-clonic), progressive ataxia, and dementia. Typically, presentation is in late childhood or adolescence; however, all ages may be affected. Although distinction from more common forms of genetic generalized epilepsy, particularly juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, may be challenging early on, the presence or evolution of 1) progressive neurologic disability, 2) failure to respond to antiepileptic drug therapy, and 3) background slowing on EEG should suggest PME. Importantly, inappropriate therapy in the genetic generalized epilepsies may result in ataxia, impaired cognition, and uncontrolled seizures, which may mimic PME. PMEs should be distinguished from progressive encephalopathies with seizures (due to degenerative conditions such as GM2 gangliosidosis, nonketotic hyperglycinemia, Niemann-Pick type C, juvenile Huntington and Alzheimer disease) and progressive myoclonic ataxias, which affect predominantly adults with progressive ataxia, myoclonus, few if any tonic-clonic seizures, and without evidence of dementia.(2,3.)
Continuous infusion pentobarbital for refractory status epilepticus in children. - Journal of child neurology
The purpose of this retrospective medical chart review was to describe dosing regimens and outcomes in children who received continuous pentobarbital therapy for refractory status epilepticus. Thirty patients (age = 6.5 ± 5.1 years; 67% male) received a mean loading dose of 5.4 ± 2.8 mg/kg with an initial infusion of 1.1 ± 0.4 mg/kg/h. Maximum infusion dose was 4.8 ± 2 mg/kg/h. Thirty-three percent of patients achieved sustained burst suppression without relapse; 66.7% experienced relapse, but 60% of those (n = 12) eventually reachieved burst suppression. Children achieving burst suppression within 24 hours of pentobarbital initiation and those older than age 5 years were 1.5 times more likely to have a positive outcome. None of these variables, however, achieved significance (Fisher exact test). Ninety-three percent of patients required inotropes; 66% acquired an infection; 10% had metabolic acidosis; and 10% experienced pancreatitis. Poor outcomes (death, encephalopathy) were observed in 33% of patients.
Intravenous levetiracetam in the management of acute seizures in children. - Pediatric neurology
Levetiracetam may be effective in children with acute seizures or status epilepticus. We performed a retrospective chart review of children who received intravenous levetiracetam within 30 minutes of a seizure. Seventy-three patients during a 2-year study period met our inclusion criteria. The mean (+/- S.D.) age and weight of the patients were 5.59 +/- 5.6 years (range, 1 day to 17.8 years) and 23.1 +/- 21 kg (range, 1.97-97 kg), respectively. Patients received a mean (+/- S.D.) levetiracetam dose of 29.4 +/- 13.5 mg/kg. Most children (n = 49, or 67%) received additional antiepileptic drugs to abort their seizure. Overall, the mean (+/- S.D.) total (abortive plus chronic) number of concomitant antiepileptic drugs used by the population was 2.53 +/- 1.7 (1.07 +/- 0.98 as additional abortive therapy, and 1.42 +/- 1.29 as chronic therapy). Most patients received levetiracetam for serial seizures (79%), whereas 12% and 8% manifested a single seizure or status epilepticus, respectively. Clinical effectiveness at 1, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the initial levetiracetam dose constituted the primary study outcome. Eighty-nine percent of patients remained seizure-free at 1 hour. This rate decreased at each evaluation time point. Most patients (71%) were placed on maintenance levetiracetam within 24 hours of their loading dose. The predictive ability of patient and drug regimen variables in outcomes was poor. Only the number of concomitant antiepileptic drugs consistently predicted outcomes. Levetiracetam was well tolerated at the doses studied, and appears most effective in single seizure events.Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Headaches in children. - Pediatric annals
Headache is an incredibly common complaint, but a detailed evaluation is necessary to diagnose some life-threatening diseases that may have their initial presentation in this manner. The evaluation and management of pediatric headaches requires close attention to a detailed "headache history," physical, neurological, and ophthalmologic examinations, and, when indicated, specific neuroimaging studies. Close follow-up of those patients with headaches is mandatory, whether they are placed on long-term or short-term medications. It also is important to appreciate the potential co-existence of headaches with other chronic disorders, such as asthma or diabetes.
Rectal biopsy in the diagnosis of neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease. - Journal of child neurology
Neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of childhood characterized by eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions and neuronal loss throughout the nervous system. Although most cases have been diagnosed postmortem, rectal biopsy may be diagnostic during life. We identified two patients: an 11-year-old boy (P1) with new-onset bulbar weakness and parkinsonism and a 15-year-old boy (P2) with severe cognitive and motor deterioration of uncertain etiology who presented at 4 years of age with a gait disturbance and motor slowing. Both patients had a history of behavioral problems marked by frequent temper tantrums. Both had nondiagnostic magnetic resonance imaging of the head and metabolic work-ups. Rectal biopsy was diagnostic 1 year (P1) and 11 years (P2) after the initial evaluation. Rectal biopsies should be considered in children presenting with otherwise unexplained multisystem degeneration, particularly in the presence of both upper and lower motoneuron signs accompanied by behavioral problems.
Response To Treatment In A Prospective National Infantile Spasms Cohort. - Annals of neurology
Infantile spasms are seizures associated with a severe epileptic encephalopathy presenting in the first 2 years of life, and optimal treatment continues to be debated. This study evaluates early and sustained response to initial treatments and addresses both clinical remission and electrographic resolution of hypsarhythmia. Secondarily, it assesses whether response to treatment differs by etiology or developmental status.The National Infantile Spasms Consortium established a multi-center, prospective database enrolling infants with new diagnosis of infantile spasms. Children were considered responders if there was clinical remission and resolution of hypsarhythmia that was sustained at three months after first treatment initiation. Standard treatments of ACTH, oral corticosteroids, and vigabatrin were considered individually, and all other non-standard therapies were analyzed collectively. Developmental status and etiology were assessed. We compared response rates by treatment group using Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression models.Two hundred and thirty infants were enrolled from 22 centers. Overall, 46% of children receiving standard therapy responded compared to only 9% who responded to non-standard therapy (p<0.001). 55% of infants receiving ACTH as initial treatment responded, compared to 39% for oral corticosteroids, 36% for vigabatrin, and 9% for other (p<0.001). Neither etiology nor development significantly modified the response pattern by treatment group.Response rate varies by treatment choice. Standard therapies should be considered as initial treatment for infantile spasms, including those with impaired development or known structural or genetic/metabolic etiology. ACTH appeared to be more effective than other standard therapies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.© 2015 American Neurological Association.

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