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Dr. Jared  Hall  Do image

Dr. Jared Hall Do

1000 Oakland Dr
Kalamazoo MI 49008
269 374-4400
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 5101020492
NPI: 1861745077
Taxonomy Codes:
207P00000X 390200000X

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Publications

Prevalence of equinus in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients. - Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
There are no conclusive data to support the contention that diabetic patients have an increased frequency of ankle equinus compared with their nondiabetic counterparts. Additionally, a presumed contributing cause of foot ulceration is ankle joint equinus. Therefore, we sought to determine whether persons with diabetes have a higher prevalence of ankle joint equinus than do nondiabetic persons.A prospective pilot survey of 102 outpatients (43 diabetic and 59 nondiabetic) was conducted. Demographic and historical data were obtained. Each patient underwent a standard lower-extremity examination, including the use of a biplane goniometer to measure ankle joint range of motion.Equinus, defined as ankle dorsiflexion measured at 0° or less, was found in 24.5% of the overall population. In the diabetes cohort, 16 of 43 patients (37.2%) were affected compared with 9 of 59 nondiabetic participants (15.3%) (P = .011). There was a threefold risk of equinus in the diabetic population (odds ratio [OR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-8.44; P < .013). The equinus group had a history of ulceration in 52.0% compared with 20.8% of the nonequinus group (P = .003). Equinus, therefore, imparted a fourfold risk of ulceration (OR, 4.13; 95% CI, 1.58-10.77; P < .004). We also found a 2.8 times risk of equinus in patients with peripheral neuropathy (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.11-7.09; P < .029).Equinus may be more prevalent in diabetic patients than previously reported. Although we cannot prove causality, we found a significant association between equinus and ulceration.
Syme amputation for limb salvage: early experience with 26 cases. - The Journal of foot and ankle surgery : official publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
The Syme amputation is often overlooked as an alternative to below-knee amputation or above-knee amputation in cases of limb-threatening foot infections and gangrene. Even though the advantages of the Syme amputation over major amputation are well cited in the literature, many surgeons do not view this amputation as a viable option for limb salvage. We herein present our initial experience with this operation in a series of patients at imminent risk for major lower extremity amputation. This study included our initial 26 patients at high risk (92% had diabetes) with infection and/or significant peripheral arterial disease who underwent ankle disarticulation for limb salvage. Medical records were abstracted for pertinent demographic and clinical data. Variables of interest included diabetes status and duration, presence of peripheral arterial disease, infection, osteomyelitis, and gangrene. Our primary outcome variable was a healed amputation, whereas secondary outcomes included time to healing, subsequent major amputations, and complications. Despite prior recommendation for below-knee amputation or above-knee amputation in each of these patients, 50% remained healed at an average of 49.3 weeks of follow-up. Although 17 patients (65.4%) ambulated in a Syme prosthesis after healing of the original Syme operation, several patients went on to major amputation for progressive sepsis or recurrent ulcers, and 1 patient subsequently died. Because of the relatively small number of study subjects, we could find no significant predictors of success or failure of this procedure. However, all 10 patients eventually succumbing to major amputation and all 3 patients who died during follow-up had diabetes mellitus. At the end of follow-up, 46.2% (12/26) patients were functioning well in a Syme prosthesis. In this high-risk cohort of patients in whom major amputation had been recommended, we achieved a healing rate of 50% at an approximate 1-year follow-up. With the majority of patients having diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, we could not find any clear predictive factors for failure or successful outcome in this small population. Nonetheless, the Syme amputation deserves further study and consideration as a viable limb salvage option in patients threatened with major lower extremity amputation.

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1000 Oakland Dr Kalamazoo, MI 49008
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