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Dr. Vinod  Chaubey  Md image

Dr. Vinod Chaubey Md

123 Summer Street Dept Of Medicne, St Vincent Hospital,Suite 120S
Worcester MA 01608
508 636-6177
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 251729
NPI: 1851656482
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Publications

Ruptured intracranial lipoma--a Fatty outburst in the brain. - The Permanente journal
Intracranial lipomas are rare congenital lesions that occur because of abnormal differentiation of embryogenic meninges. These lipomas are usually seen incidentally on brain imaging, and are usually asymptomatic and do not require treatment. The authors present a case of ruptured intracranial lipoma, discovered in an elderly patient presenting with dizziness and episodes of falls.
Interatrial block in the modern era. - Current cardiology reviews
Interatrial block (IAB; P-wave duration ≥ 110 ms), which represents a delay in the conduction between the atria, is a pandemic conduction abnormality that is frequently underappreciated in clinical practice. Despite its comprehensive documentation in the medical literature, it has still not received adequate attention and also not adequately described and discussed in most cardiology textbooks. IAB can be of varying degrees and classified based on the degree of P-duration and its morphology. It can transform into a higher degree block and can also manifest transiently. IAB may be a preceding or causative risk factor for various atrial arrhythmias (esp. atrial fibrillation) and also be associated with various other clinical abnormalities ranging from left atrial dilation and thromboembolism including embolic stroke and mesenteric ischemia. IAB certainly deserves more attention and prospective studies are needed to formulate a standard consensus regarding appropriate management strategies.
Opana ER abuse and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like illness: a rising risk factor in illicit drug users. - BMJ case reports
We report the case of a 22 year-old-woman who presented with upper extremity cellulitis secondary to an infiltration of illicit intravenous drug use. She confessed to the intravenous use of Opana ER (an extended release oral formulation of oxymorphone) which is an opioid drug approved only for oral use. She was found to have clinical evidence of profound thrombotic microangiopathy which resulted due to the intravenous use of Opana ER. She showed full clinical improvement after withholding drug and supportive clinical care. Recent report of Opana ER intravenous abuse was published from Tennessee county and has now been increasingly recognised as one of the causes of thrombocytopenia which mimicks clinically as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Physicians should be aware of this association as the lack of familiarity to this can pose serious management dilemmas for our patients (especially the polysubstance abusers).
Diagnostic electrocardiographic dyad criteria of emphysema in left ventricular hypertrophy. - International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
The electrocardiographic diagnostic dyad of emphysema, namely a combination of the frontal vertical P-vector and a narrow QRS duration, can serve as a quasidiagnostic marker for emphysema, with specificity close to 100%. We postulated that the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy in emphysema may affect the sensitivity of this electrocardiographic criterion given that left ventricular hypertrophy generates prominent left ventricular forces and may increase the QRS duration.We reviewed the electrocardiograms and echocardiograms for 73 patients with emphysema. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy. The P-vector, QRS duration, and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were computed and compared between the two subgroups.There was no statistically significant difference in qualitative lung function (FEV1) between the subgroups. There was no statistically significant difference in mean P-vector between the subgroups. The mean QRS duration was significantly longer in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy as compared with those without left ventricular hypertrophy.The presence of left ventricular hypertrophy may not affect the sensitivity of the P-vector verticalization when used as a lone criterion for diagnosing emphysema. However, the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy may significantly reduce the sensitivity of the electrocardiographic diagnostic dyad in emphysema, as it causes a widening of the QRS duration.
Ataxia: a diagnostic perplexity and management dilemma. - BMJ case reports
A 79-year-old woman presented with lower extremity weakness and unsteadiness for 2 weeks. She was recently diagnosed with refractory atrial flutter and was prescribed amiodarone. Physical examination revealed signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Neuroimaging including CT and MRI were unremarkable. Her hospital course included the development of ventricular tachycardia necessitating increment in amiodarone dose. Laboratory studies were unremarkable except mild transaminitis. Other workup including the one for paraneoplastic neurological involvement was negative. The patient experienced worsening of ataxia requiring assistance with ambulation. In view of comprehensive routine negative work-up for ataxia, recent use of amiodarone and worsening of symptomatology with increase in its dosing, drug-induced neurotoxicity from amiodarone was suspected. Amiodarone dose was subsequently reduced and mexilitine was introduced as an additive antiarrhythmic therapy for ventricular tachycardia. In follow-up, the patient experienced significant improvement in her symptoms and was able to ambulate independently. She was subsequently discharged to short-term rehabilitation.
Electrocardiographic impacts of lung resection. - Journal of electrocardiology
Electrocardiographic (ECG) changes accompanying lung resection have not been well investigated previously in a large controlled series of human adults. Thus, our current investigation was undertaken for a better understanding of the ECG changes associated with lung resection.Medical records of 117 patients who underwent lung resection (segmentectomy, lobectomy, or pneumonectomy) were reviewed. Their clinical course and ECGs were compared during early, intermediate and late postoperative course (<1 month, 1 month to 1 year and >1 year post-op respectively).Patients in the acute postoperative phase had higher heart rate, increased maximum P-duration and P-dispersion, increased incidence of atrial arrhythmias and frequent ST-T changes. P-vector and QRS-vector were significantly affected after the lung resections; the correlation being most consistent between the anatomical displacements and the QRS-vector in the majority of patients. The axial shifts also demonstrated a characteristic temporal relationship after left pneumonectomy (a leftward deviation in the acute, normal or slight rightward deviation in the intermediate and a rightward deviation in the late postoperative course). The precordial R/S transition is often affected due to the mediastinal shifts and the ECGs in patients after left lung resection may simulate acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction due to a delayed R/S transition.The understanding and recognition of the expected ECG findings after lung resection are imperative to avoid confusing these changes with other acute cardiopulmonary events which would prevent unnecessary further investigational work-up. These ECG changes are often dynamic and may bear a temporal relationship to the dynamic post-surgical changes in the thoracic anatomy.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Cold agglutinin-induced haemolysis in association with antinuclear antibody-negative SLE. - BMJ case reports
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic relapsing autoimmune disease associated with several autoantibodies targeted to nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens. Serum antinuclear antibody (ANA) is considered an important diagnostic marker of SLE. However, 2-3% of patients with typical clinical picture of SLE may have persistently negative ANA tests. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA) in SLE is usually mediated by warm IgG anti-erythrocyte antibodies. Our report describes a female patient who presented with clinical manifestations of SLE including photosensitivity, joint pains and AIHA. Further workup revealed high cold IgM agglutinin titres. A comprehensive workup for infectious aetiologies was negative. Autoimmune studies revealed negative ANA, but positive anti-double-stranded DNA and antiphospholipid antibodies. Lymphoproliferative disorder was excluded by imaging studies. Initial treatment with steroids proved of little benefit; however, rituximab resulted in significant clinical improvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is perhaps the first report of ANA-negative SLE presenting with cold AIHA.
P-wave indices in patients with pulmonary emphysema: do P-terminal force and interatrial block have confounding effects? - International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Pulmonary emphysema causes several electrocardiogram changes, and one of the most common and well known is on the frontal P-wave axis. P-axis verticalization (P-axis > 60°) serves as a quasidiagnostic indicator of emphysema. The correlation of P-axis verticalization with the radiological severity of emphysema and severity of chronic obstructive lung function have been previously investigated and well described in the literature. However, the correlation of P-axis verticalization in emphysema with other P-indices like P-terminal force in V1 (Ptf), amplitude of initial positive component of P-waves in V1 (i-PV1), and interatrial block (IAB) have not been well studied. Our current study was undertaken to investigate the effects of emphysema on these P-wave indices in correlation with the verticalization of the P-vector.Unselected, routinely recorded electrocardiograms of 170 hospitalized emphysema patients were studied. Significant Ptf (s-Ptf) was considered ≥40 mm.ms and was divided into two types based on the morphology of P-waves in V1: either a totally negative (-) P wave in V1 or a biphasic (+/-) P wave in V1.s-Ptf correlated better with vertical P-vectors than nonvertical P-vectors (P = 0.03). s-Ptf also significantly correlated with IAB (P = 0.001); however, IAB and P-vector verticalization did not appear to have any significant correlation (P = 0.23). There was a very weak correlation between i-PV1 and frontal P-vector (r = 0.15; P = 0.047); however, no significant correlation was found between i-PV1 and P-amplitude in lead III (r = 0.07; P = 0.36).We conclude that increased P-tf in emphysema may be due to downward right atrial position caused by right atrial displacement, and thus the common assumption that increased P-tf implies left atrial enlargement should be made with caution in patients with emphysema. Also, the lack of strong correlation between i-PV1 and P-amplitude in lead III or vertical P-vector may suggest the predominant role of downward right atrial distortion rather than right atrial enlargement in causing vertical P-vector in emphysema.
Efficacy of gabapentin for prevention of postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort in patients undergoing transurethral resection of bladder tumor. - Urology
To evaluate the effect of 600 mg and 1200 mg oral gabapentin pretreatment for the prevention of postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) in patients undergoing catheterization after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT).One hundred adult patients undergoing elective TURBT under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated into 3 groups. Group I patients received placebo, group II patients received 600 mg gabapentin, and group III patients received 1200 mg gabapentin 1 hour before surgery. Lumber subarachnoid block was administered with 2.5 mL 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine. The patients were observed for the incidence and severity of CRBD in the postoperative period.The incidence of CRBD was 90% in group I, 66% in group II, and 26% in group III. The incidence of bladder discomfort was significantly low in group III at all time points compared with group I and at 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours compared with group II. The severity of CRBD was also less in group II and III patients compared with group I. Fifteen patients in group I developed moderate discomfort, whereas 1 patient in group II and none in group III. None of the patient receiving gabapentin had severe discomfort. The duration and level of sensory and motor block was comparable among groups. One patient in group II and 2 patients in group III were complained of dizziness in postoperative period.Gabapentin 1200 mg administered before surgery is more effective than gabapentin 600 mg in decreasing the incidence of postoperative CRBD.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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