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Dr. Michael  Iv  Md image

Dr. Michael Iv Md

751 S Bascom Ave Department Of Radiology
San Jose CA 95128
408 855-5000
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: A101183
NPI: 1851571681
Taxonomy Codes:
2085R0202X

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Publications

Intensity-Corrected Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) for Improved Pediatric Brain Diffusion Imaging. - PloS one
Here we investigate the utility of a dual-echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) approach to improve lesion conspicuity in pediatric imaging. This method delivers two 'echo images' for one diffusion-preparation period. We also demonstrate how the echoes can be utilized to remove transmit/receive coil-induced and static magnetic field intensity modulations on both echo images, which often mimic pathology and thereby pose diagnostic challenges. DE-EPI DWI data were acquired in 18 pediatric patients with abnormal diffusion lesions, and 46 pediatric patient controls at 3T. Echo1 [TE = 45ms] and Echo2 [TE = 86ms] were corrected for signal intensity variation across the images by exploiting the images equivalent coil-sensitivity and susceptibility-induced modulations. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed Echo1 and Echo2 and their intensity-corrected variants (cEcho1 and cEcho2) on a 7-point Likert scale, with grading on lesion conspicuity diagnostic confidence. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map from Echo1 was used to validate presence of true pathology. Echo2 was unanimously favored over Echo1 for its sensitivity for detecting acute brain injury, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.7/4.4 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.1/4.3 (p = 0.025). cEcho2 was rated higher than cEcho1, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.5/4.3 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.4/4.4 (p < 0.005). cEcho2 was favored over all echoes for its diagnostic reliability, particularly in regions close to the head coil. This work concludes that DE-EPI DWI is a useful alternative to conventional single-echo EPI DWI, whereby Echo2 and cEcho2 allows for improved lesion detection and overall higher diagnostic confidence.
Imaging neck masses in the neonate and young infant. - Seminars in ultrasound, CT, and MR
Head and neck masses occurring in the neonatal period and early infancy consist of vascular tumors, vascular malformations, benign and malignant soft tissue tumors, and other developmental lesions. Although some lesions can be diagnosed on clinical grounds, others can only be diagnosed by imaging. Beyond diagnosis, imaging plays a significant role in evaluating the location and extent of a lesion for possible intervention. In this article, we review the clinical presentation and imaging appearance of common and rare masses that may be encountered in this age group. We also highlight current treatment strategies for specific lesions.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Congenital brain malformations in the neonatal and early infancy period. - Seminars in ultrasound, CT, and MR
Congenital brain malformations are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients who are younger than 2 years. Optimization of patient care requires accurate diagnosis, which can be challenging as congenital brain malformations include an extensive variety of anomalies. Radiologic imaging helps to identify the malformations and to guide management. Understanding radiologic findings necessitates knowledge of central nervous system embryogenesis. This review discusses the imaging of congenital brain malformations encountered in patients who are younger than 2 years in the context of brain development.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Clinical applications of iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging of brain tumors. - Nanomedicine (London, England)
Current neuroimaging provides detailed anatomic and functional evaluation of brain tumors, allowing for improved diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. Some challenges persist even with today's advanced imaging techniques, including accurate delineation of tumor margins and distinguishing treatment effects from residual or recurrent tumor. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are an emerging tool that can add clinically useful information due to their distinct physiochemical features and biodistribution, while having a good safety profile. Nanoparticles can be used as a platform for theranostic drugs, which have shown great promise for the treatment of CNS malignancies. This review will provide an overview of clinical ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides and how they can be applied to the diagnostic and therapeutic neuro-oncologic setting.
Association of developmental venous anomalies with perfusion abnormalities on arterial spin labeling and bolus perfusion-weighted imaging. - Journal of neuroimaging : official journal of the American Society of Neuroimaging
To investigate the frequency and characteristics of developmental venous anomaly (DVA)-associated perfusion abnormalities on arterial spin labeling (ASL) and bolus perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and discuss their potential causes.We reviewed brain MR reports to identify all DVAs reported on studies performed between 2009 and 2012. DVA location and findings on PWI and/or ASL imaging were assessed by visual inspection. Sizes of DVAs were categorized as small (<15 mm), medium (15-25 mm), and large (>25 mm). For ASL, signal in the DVA, surrounding parenchyma, or associated draining vein was recorded. For PWI, changes on hemodynamic maps (cerebral blood volume [CBV], cerebral blood flow [CBF], mean transit time [MTT], and normalized time-to-peak of the residue function [Tmax]) were evaluated. Coexisting vascular malformations in association with DVAs were also identified.Six hundred and fifty-two DVAs were identified in 632 subjects. Of these, 121 underwent both perfusion modalities, 15 only PWI, and 127 only ASL. ASL abnormalities were seen in 21/248 (8%), including signal in a draining vein (2/21, 10%), in the DVA (11/21, 52%), and in the parenchyma (8/21, 38%). On PWI, the majority of DVAs demonstrated abnormalities (108/136, 79%), typically increased CBF, CBV, MTT, and Tmax. There was no association between DVA size and presence of ASL signal (P = .836). Borderline statistical significance was found between DVA size and presence of PWI abnormality (P = .046). No relationship was found between the presence of a coexisting vascular malformation and presence of ASL (P = .468) or PWI abnormality (P = .745).Perfusion changes with DVAs are common on PWI but uncommon on ASL. PWI findings are expected based on the anatomy and physiology of DVAs and are accentuated by gradient echo acquisition. DVAs with intrinsic ASL signal or signal in draining veins may be associated with arteriovenous shunting (transitional lesions).Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.
Prolonged survival of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in the modern treatment era. - Clinical lung cancer
Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LM) is a severe complication of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) historically associated with poor prognosis. New chemotherapeutic and targeted treatments could potentially affect the natural history of LM.Patients with a pathologic diagnosis of NSCLC with LM treated at Stanford between 2003 and 2011 were identified via institutional databases and medical records. LM was defined by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that was positive for malignant cells or by LM enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium contrast. Retrospective, landmark analyses were performed to estimate survival. Statistical analyses were performed using SAS Enterprise Guide, version 4.3.LM was identified in 30 patients. All cases were adenocarcinoma; 60% of patients had a known or suspected driver mutation. The mean age was 58 years. Of the 30 patients, 67% were women; 70% were nonsmokers; 27% initially presented with LM; 84% received systemic treatment at or after development of LM; and 53% of these patients received modern systemic therapy for their LM, defined as a regimen containing pemetrexed, bevacizumab, or a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Mean overall survival after LM diagnosis was 6 months (95% CI, 3-12). Patients who received modern systemic therapy for LM had decreased hazard of death (hazard ratio [HR], 0.24; P = .007).In this retrospective, single-institution analysis, median survival with LM was higher compared with historical experience. Patients who received modern systemic therapy for their LM had particularly good outcomes. These data provide evidence for improving survival outcomes in the modern treatment era for this difficult-to-treat complication.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Imaging spectrum of CNS coccidioidomycosis: prevalence and significance of concurrent brain and spinal disease. - AJR. American journal of roentgenology
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and significance of concurrent coccidioidal brain and intraspinal disease.We conducted a retrospective imaging review of 23 patients with proven coccidioidal CNS meningitis.All patients had intracranial abnormalities, and 86% (19/22) who underwent spinal imaging had signs of intraspinal disease, including leptomeningeal enhancement (84%), arachnoiditis (63%), and cord signal abnormalities (37%); seven of 15 patients (47%) who underwent myelography had complete spinal blocks.The high prevalence of concurrent brain and intraspinal coccidioidomycosis supports a low threshold for spinal imaging.
Comparison of readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) and single-shot EPI in clinical application of diffusion-weighted imaging of the pediatric brain. - AJR. American journal of roentgenology
Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) has been suggested as an alternative to single-shot EPI for diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with reduced distortion. However, clinical comparisons of readout-segmented EPI and EPI DWI are limited by unmatched imaging parameters and reconstruction procedures. Our goal was to compare the clinical utility of generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition (GRAPPA)-accelerated readout-segmented EPI DWI with GRAPPA-accelerated EPI DWI for visualization of the pediatric brain in regions prone to distortion, such as the orbit, skull base, and posterior fossa.Thirty consecutive patients (mean age, 7.8 years) presenting with orbital, skull base, and posterior fossa neuropathologic abnormalities were scanned at 3 T. Images were obtained using GRAPPA-accelerated readout-segmented EPI and GRAPPA-accelerated EPI with an identical scanning time, acceleration factor, target resolution, and image postprocessing procedure. The two datasets were independently reviewed by two blinded neuroradiologists. Imaging studies were evaluated for resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, distortion, lesion conspicuity, and diagnostic confidence and graded using a 7-point Likert scale (1, nondiagnostic; 7, outstanding).There was good reader agreement in the scores (κ = 0.66; 95% CI, 0.54-0.78). The mean scores for EPI and readout-segmented EPI, respectively, were as follows: resolution, 5.0 and 6.0; SNR, 5.5 and 3.0; contrast, 3.7 and 3.2; distortion, 4.8 and 6.0; lesion conspicuity, 4.6 and 5.1; and diagnostic confidence, 4.7 and 5.4. Readout-segmented EPI was superior in resolution, distortion reduction, lesion conspicuity, and diagnostic confidence, whereas EPI scored better in SNR and contrast. Readout-segmented EPI was considered the better sequence overall in 85% of the cases.This study shows the benefits of improved resolution and reduced distortion of readout-segmented EPI in evaluating the orbit, skull base, and posterior fossa, sites of common neuropathologic abnormalities in children.
Informatics in radiology: use of a macro scripting editor to facilitate transfer of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry reports into an existing departmental voice recognition dictation system. - Radiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
The process of verbally reporting or manually retyping numeric data generated at dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) involves numerous pitfalls. With use of a macro scripting editor, a customized macro was created to automate the transfer of data generated by a DXA scanner into a structured voice recognition dictation system without requiring radiologists to type in a medical record number or accession number to identify the study. A preliminary report is generated with use of software for a DXA unit and a customized template that includes numeric and qualitative assessments of osteoporosis as well as data from prior studies if available. A customized macro is then invoked by the macro scripting editor, which selectively transfers the report from the draft document into the voice recognition dictation system, thereby producing a final structured diagnostic report. All of the radiologists surveyed to evaluate this automated method reported ease of software use and greater efficiency in report production. In addition, a random audit of the 800 DXA scans that have been reported with this technique demonstrated no reports generated under an incorrect accession number and no incorrect transfer of data. Automated DXA reporting is now the preferred method of dictation at the authors' institution and represents an inexpensive, accurate, and customizable means of DXA reporting.
Left ventricular ejection fraction using 64-slice CT coronary angiography and new evaluation software: initial experience. - The British journal of radiology
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of software-based quantification of left ventricular function using 64-slice CT coronary angiography. Data were collected from 26 subjects who underwent a 64-slice coronary CT angiography study. Two volumetric data sets at end diastole and end systole were reconstructed from each scan by means of retrospective electrocardiogram gating. Data sets were evaluated with a prototype of now commercially available software (Syngo Circulation I; Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany), which automatically segments the blood volume in the left ventricle after the user defines the mitral valve plane and any point within the ventricle. After segmentation of the blood pool in end systole and end diastole, the software automatically measures end systolic and end diastolic volume and calculates stroke volume and ejection fraction (EF). Two readers processed all CT data sets twice to assess for intra- and inter-observer variation. In addition, CT EF measurements were compared with those obtained by clinical echocardiography. Intra-observer variation for the calculated EF with CT were 13.6% and 15.6% for Readers 1 and 2, respectively. No significant difference in left ventricular functional parameters on CT existed between the readers (p > 0.05). A Bland-Altman plot revealed a slight mean difference between EF measurements on CT and echocardiography, with all differences falling within two standard deviations of the mean in the setting of wide limits of agreement. In conclusion, assessment of left ventricular EF from CT coronary data using the new analysis software is rapid and easy. The software is user-friendly and provides good reproducibility for EF measurements with CT.

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