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Dr. Shane  Anderson  Do image

Dr. Shane Anderson Do

220 Bannock St
Malad City ID 83252
208 662-2600
Medical School: Kirksville College Of Osteopathic Medicine - 2002
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1841289659
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Shane Anderson is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$137.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$63.27
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$135.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$62.99
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$76.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$34.51
HCPCS Code:81002 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/o scope Average Price:$8.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.62

HCPCS Code Definitions

99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1144339904
Family Practice
4,593
1467563866
Orthopedic Surgery
1,316
1497834980
Diagnostic Radiology
514
1871558239
Hematology/Oncology
500
1346236213
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
461
1083641385
General Surgery
442
1932288412
Diagnostic Radiology
372
1073567384
Diagnostic Radiology
307
1699854257
Diagnostic Radiology
282
1164579736
Nephrology
277
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Anderson has made to other doctors

Publications

The Impact of Smoking on Ossiculoplasty Outcomes. - Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
To assess the impact of tobacco smoking on outcomes after ossiculoplasty.Case series with chart review.Tertiary care center.Adult patients (16-88 yr of age) undergoing ossiculoplasty with cartilage tympanoplasty.Patients were classified as smokers (TOB) or nonsmokers (TOB). Comparisons were then made between these two groups with regard to early and late audiometric outcomes, rate of cure of conductive hearing loss, rate of successful graft healing, and incidence of complications after surgery.There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative ΔPTA-ABG (change in pure-tone average air-bone gap) (-14.4 dB vs. -14.6 dB for TOB vs. TOB, respectively, p = 0.946) or final audiometric outcome (ΔPTA-ABGfinal) (-13.6 dB vs. -11.7 dB for TOB vs. TOB, respectively, p = 0.315), cure of conductive hearing loss, defined as closure of the PTA-ABG to ≤20 dB HL, at postoperative audiometry (75.0% [129/172] for the TOB group vs. 69.3% [52/75] for the TOB group, p = 0.355), late audiometry (71.4% [105/147] for the TOB group vs. 66.7% [44/66] for the TOB group, p = 0.483), or successful graft healing (99.4% in the TOB group vs. 98.7% in the TOB group, p = 0.544). However, complications were observed significantly (p = 0.0003) more often in the TOB group (34.7% [26/75]) than the TOB group (14.5% [25/172]).Smoking is not a significant risk factor for anatomic failure of cartilage tympanic membrane graft or worsened audiometric outcome after ossiculoplasty. However, complications were significantly more common in smokers, supporting the practice of primary tympanostomy tube placement at the time of ossiculoplasty.
Smartphone-based system to improve transportation access for the cognitively impaired. - Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Annual Conference
This project developed and evaluated a smartphone-based system to improve mobility and transportation access for the cognitively impaired. The proposed system is intended to allow the cognitively impaired to use public transportation systems, community transportation and dedicated transportation services for the disabled with greater ease and safety. Individuals with cognitive disabilities are often unable to operate an automobile, or may require a prolonged recovery period before resuming driving. Public transportation systems represent a significant means to allow these individuals to maintain independence. Yet public transportation systems can pose significant challenges to individuals with cognitive impairment. The goal of this project is to develop a system to reduce these barriers via a technological solution consisting of components developed both for the cognitively impaired user and their caregiver or family member. The first component consists of a cognitive prosthetic device featuring traditional memory cueing and reminders as well as custom location-based transportation specific functions. This cognitive mobility assistant will leverage the computing power and GPS location determination capabilities of inexpensive, powerful smart phones. The second component consists of a management application which offers caregivers the ability to configure and program the reminder and transit functions remotely via the Internet. Following completion of the prototype system a pilot human test was performed with cognitively disabled individuals and family members or caregivers to assess the usability and acceptability of both system components.
Morel-LAvallee lesion initially diagnosed as quadriceps contusion: ultrasound, MRI, and importance of early intervention. - The western journal of emergency medicine
Morel-Lavallee lesions (MLL) are rare, closed degloving injuries caused by trauma that delivers a shearing force to the soft tissue most commonly of the hip. If not treated in the acute and subacute setting these lesions are often complicated by re-accumulation of fluid, infection, or chronic pain. We present a unique case of a recurrent, massive medial knee/thigh MLL in which proper treatment was delayed due to initial diagnosis of a quadriceps contusion. We describe the ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings of this patient and based on a review of recent literature propose that the initial management should have included early drainage/debridement, which likely could have prevented recurrence and significantly shortened the clinical course.
Pediatric cartilage tympanoplasty with primary intubation. - Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
The purpose of this study was to analyze the anatomical and audiologic results in pediatric Type I cartilage tympanoplasties with primary intubation. Our hypothesis was that the outcome of patients with tubes placed would be similar to those without tubes, even though the ears that received tubes were in worse condition.Retrospective chart review of patients undergoing cartilage tympanoplasty with intubation between 2007 and 2012.All surgeries were performed or supervised by the senior author as the surgeon, using a modification of the perichondrium/cartilage island flap. All patients had a tube placed through the cartilage to allow for middle ear aeration. Hearing results were reported using a four-frequency (500, 1,000, 2,000, 3,000 Hz) pure-tone average and a pure-tone average air-bone gap (PTA-ABG). Postoperative complications were recorded.During the study period, cartilage with intubation was used for tympanic membrane reconstruction in 20 patients. Of these, 10 (50.0%) had craniofacial abnormalities, and the remainder had documented Eustachian tube dysfunction with mucoid effusion present at the time of surgery. The average patient age was 8 years, and the average follow-up was 39 months. The average pre- and postoperative PTA-ABGs were 25.1 ± 11.2 dB (standard deviation, SD) and 15.1 ± 10.2 dB (p < 0.05), respectively, and the average pre- and postoperative PTAs were 36.6 ± 12.4 and 24.9 ± 12.0 dB (p < 0.05), respectively. Only one case had to undergo revision, which was a result of a cholesteatoma. Of the 20 patients, 15 still had patent tubes at last follow-up, three had their tubes removed, and two had tube extrusion.Cartilage tympanoplasty with intubation achieves good anatomical and audiologic results when Eustachian tube dysfunction or craniofacial abnormalities are present. Significant hearing improvement was realized in a patient population that is characteristically more prone to problems.
Indoor inertial waypoint navigation for the blind. - Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Annual Conference
Indoor navigation technology is needed to support seamless mobility for the visually impaired. This paper describes the construction and evaluation of an inertial dead reckoning navigation system that provides real-time auditory guidance along mapped routes. Inertial dead reckoning is a navigation technique coupling step counting together with heading estimation to compute changes in position at each step. The research described here outlines the development and evaluation of a novel navigation system that utilizes information from the mapped route to limit the problematic error accumulation inherent in traditional dead reckoning approaches. The prototype system consists of a wireless inertial sensor unit, placed at the users' hip, which streams readings to a smartphone processing a navigation algorithm. Pilot human trials were conducted assessing system efficacy by studying route-following performance with blind and sighted subjects using the navigation system with real-time guidance, versus offline verbal directions.
Indoor magnetic navigation for the blind. - Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Annual Conference
Indoor navigation technology is needed to support seamless mobility for the visually impaired. This paper describes the construction of and evaluation of a navigation system that infers the users' location using only magnetic sensing. It is well known that the environments within steel frame structures are subject to significant magnetic distortions. Many of these distortions are persistent and have sufficient strength and spatial characteristics to allow their use as the basis for a location technology. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a prototype magnetic navigation system consisting of a wireless magnetometer placed at the users' hip streaming magnetic readings to a smartphone processing location algorithms. Human trials were conducted to assess the efficacy of the system by studying route-following performance with blind and sighted subjects using the navigation system for real-time guidance.
Public transportation assistant for the cognitively impaired. - Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Annual Conference
This project developed and evaluated the utility of a mobility assistant cognitive prosthetic that leverages the computing power and GPS location determination capabilities of smart phones to provide location-sensitive mobility assistance. New relatively inexpensive smart phones offer powerful computing and location sensing capabilities. A prototype cognitive prosthetic was developed to assist users in their use of transportation systems. User Interface design included remote caregiver programming features, and automated SMS status generation. Location specific memory cues are triggered by comparing current GPS coordinate location with expected route coordinates obtained from stored route databases based on the GTFS feeds from transit systems. Additional development focused on developing algorithms to identify potential user errors, such as wrong-bus. These reminders and instructions will allow cognitively disabled persons to utilize public transportation systems with greater confidence leading to greater mobility and independence.
Indoor waypoint navigation via magnetic anomalies. - Conference proceedings : ... Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Annual Conference
A wide assortment of technologies have been proposed to construct indoor navigation services for the blind and vision impaired. Proximity-based systems and multilateration systems have been successfully demonstrated and employed. Despite the technical success of these technologies, broad adoption has been limited due to their significant infrastructure and maintenance costs. An alternative approach utilizing the indoor magnetic signatures inherent to steel-frame buildings solves the infrastructure cost problem; in effect the existing building is the location system infrastructure. Although magnetic indoor navigation does not require the installation of dedicated hardware, the dedication of resources to produce precise survey maps of magnetic anomalies represents a further barrier to adoption. In the present work an alternative leader-follower form of waypoint-navigation system has been developed that works without surveyed magnetic maps of a site. Instead the wayfarer's magnetometer readings are compared to a pre-recorded magnetic "leader" trace containing magnetic data collected along a route and annotated with waypoint information. The goal of the navigation system is to correlate the follower's magnetometer data with the leader's to trigger audio cues at precise points along the route, thus providing location-based guidance to the user. The system should also provide early indications of off-route conditions. As part of the research effort a smartphone based application was created to record and annotate leader traces with audio and numeric data at waypoints of interest, and algorithms were developed to determine (1) when the follower reaches a waypoint and (2) when the follower goes off-route. A navigation system utilizing this technology would enable a low-cost indoor navigation system capable of replaying audio annotations at precise locations along pre-recorded routes.
The NSAID dilemma: managing osteoarthritis in high-risk patients. - The Physician and sportsmedicine
For decades, evidence-based data and reported experience have warned that the common chronic oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy for osteoarthritis (OA) in elderly patients is ultimately dangerous. Elderly patients with OA are at heightened risk for developing serious gastrointestional and cardiovascular adverse events, including gastrointestinal bleeding, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Prescribing NSAIDs, especially in an elderly population, continues to be discouraged because of these significant risks. A dilemma exists for individuals who need the established efficacy associated with oral NSAIDs but who are at increased risk for serious adverse events associated with these agents. The goal of this clinical review was to evaluate the risks versus benefits of current options in the treatment of OA. This review found that topical NSAIDs seem to be the safest choice among all options to mitigate gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks and should be considered prior to the initiation of oral nonselective or cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-selective NSAIDs for individuals presenting with a localized expression of OA. Further research is needed to evaluate and compare these therapies in treating both pain and inflammation effectively while mitigating safety risks in high-risk populations.
T-cell specific defect in expression of the NTPDase CD39 as a biomarker for lupus. - Cellular immunology
Regulatory T cells (T(regs)) are critical for maintenance of peripheral tolerance via suppression of T-cell responses, and absence of T(regs) results in autoimmunity. The role of aberrations in the T(reg) pool for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) remains uncertain. T(reg)-mediated generation of adenosine, dependent on the ectonucleotidase CD39, is an important mechanism for suppression of T-cell responses. We tested whether decreases in numbers of T(regs), and specifically CD39-expressing T(regs), are associated with human lupus. We studied 15 SLE patients, six patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 24 healthy controls. T(reg) phenotypic markers, including CD39 expression, were studied by flow cytometry. Varying numbers of sorted T(regs) cells were co-cultured with responder T (T(resp)) cells, with proliferation assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. The proportion of T(regs) as defined by Foxp3(+) CD25(+high) CD127(-/low) was similar in lupus and control populations. CD39-expressing T(regs) comprised 37±13% of the T(reg) population in healthy controls and 36±21% in lupus subjects using nonsteroidal immunosuppressants to control active disease, but was nearly absent in five of six lupus subjects with minimally active disease. In contrast to healthy controls and lupus subjects without the CD39 defect, in SLE subjects with the CD39 defect, adenosine-dependent T(reg)-mediated suppression was nearly absent. These results suggest that functional defects in T(regs), rather than reduced T(reg) numbers, are important for the loss of peripheral tolerance in lupus. Presentation of this defect may serve as a biomarker for untreated disease.Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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220 Bannock St Malad City, ID 83252
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Nearby Doctors

220 Bannock St
Malad City, ID 83252
208 662-2600
220 Bannock St
Malad City, ID 83252
208 662-2600
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Malad City, ID 83252
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Malad City, ID 83252
208 662-2204