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Dr. Julius  Fernandez  Md image

Dr. Julius Fernandez Md

6325 Humphreys Blvd Semmes-Murphey Clinic
Memphis TN 38120
901 227-7700
Medical School: University Of Tennessee College Of Medicine - 2005
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: MD38431
NPI: 1841289493
Taxonomy Codes:
207T00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Julius Fernandez is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:22842 Description:Insert spine fixation device Average Price:$7,000.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$694.46
HCPCS Code:22633 Description:Lumbar spine fusion combined Average Price:$6,289.77 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,549.15
HCPCS Code:63047 Description:Removal of spinal lamina Average Price:$4,227.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$715.55
HCPCS Code:22325 Description:Treat spine fracture Average Price:$3,984.38 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$600.37
HCPCS Code:22612 Description:Lumbar spine fusion Average Price:$4,143.75 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,221.77
HCPCS Code:22851 Description:Apply spine prosth device Average Price:$2,334.56 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$343.34
HCPCS Code:22614 Description:Spine fusion extra segment Average Price:$1,459.24 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$344.99
HCPCS Code:63048 Description:Remove spinal lamina add-on Average Price:$1,200.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$192.33
HCPCS Code:72148 Description:Mri lumbar spine w/o dye Average Price:$1,059.10 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$296.61
HCPCS Code:72131 Description:Ct lumbar spine w/o dye Average Price:$599.09 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$144.15
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$225.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$97.46
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$225.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$97.59
HCPCS Code:72010 Description:X-ray exam of spine Average Price:$171.39 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$61.39
HCPCS Code:99221 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$190.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$92.70
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$155.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$65.75
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$95.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$39.36
HCPCS Code:72100 Description:X-ray exam of lower spine Average Price:$77.84 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$27.90
HCPCS Code:72040 Description:X-ray exam of neck spine Average Price:$60.96 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$29.68
HCPCS Code:J1885 Description:Ketorolac tromethamine inj Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$0.25

HCPCS Code Definitions

99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
22325
Open treatment and/or reduction of vertebral fracture(s) and/or dislocation(s), posterior approach, 1 fractured vertebra or dislocated segment; lumbar
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
22612
Arthrodesis, posterior or posterolateral technique, single level; lumbar (with lateral transverse technique, when performed)
22851
Application of intervertebral biomechanical device(s) (eg, synthetic cage(s), methylmethacrylate) to vertebral defect or interspace (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
22842
Posterior segmental instrumentation (eg, pedicle fixation, dual rods with multiple hooks and sublaminar wires); 3 to 6 vertebral segments (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
22633
Arthrodesis, combined posterior or posterolateral technique with posterior interbody technique including laminectomy and/or discectomy sufficient to prepare interspace (other than for decompression), single interspace and segment; lumbar
22614
Arthrodesis, posterior or posterolateral technique, single level; each additional vertebral segment (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
63047
Laminectomy, facetectomy and foraminotomy (unilateral or bilateral with decompression of spinal cord, cauda equina and/or nerve root[s], [eg, spinal or lateral recess stenosis]), single vertebral segment; lumbar
72148
Magnetic resonance (eg, proton) imaging, spinal canal and contents, lumbar; without contrast material
72100
Radiologic examination, spine, lumbosacral; 2 or 3 views
72040
Radiologic examination, spine, cervical; 2 or 3 views
72131
Computed tomography, lumbar spine; without contrast material
63048
Laminectomy, facetectomy and foraminotomy (unilateral or bilateral with decompression of spinal cord, cauda equina and/or nerve root[s], [eg, spinal or lateral recess stenosis]), single vertebral segment; each additional segment, cervical, thoracic, or lumbar (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
72010
Radiologic examination, spine, entire, survey study, anteroposterior and lateral
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99221
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
J1885
Injection, ketorolac tromethamine, per 15 mg

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1437252780
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
613
1982656484
Diagnostic Radiology
277
1356391916
Diagnostic Radiology
265
1003921404
Diagnostic Radiology
226
1447365846
Diagnostic Radiology
221
1376658781
Diagnostic Radiology
216
1154326403
Anesthesiology
213
1033119474
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
207
1578530895
Infectious Disease
203
1982707410
Diagnostic Radiology
187
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Fernandez has made to other doctors

Publications

The posterior corrective spondylodesis - method of choice of surgical scoliosis treatment. - Medicinski arhiv
The adolescent idiopathic scoliosis - AIS over 40 degrees measured by Cobb, are treated by surgery. Most frequently are used corrective spondylodesis by Harrington (with hooks), by Luqe (with wires), anterior spondylodesis (with transcorporal screws). In last two decades, the posterior corrective spondylodesis by transpedicular screws is popularized. Aim of this work is to present advantages and disadvantages of posterior corrective spondylodesis of scoliosis.Twenty-three patients have been included in this study, average age of 15 y. (10-32), and mostly female gender. The dynamic and quality of postoperative flow after posterior corrective spondylodesis have been analyzed at the AIS patients on the Dept. of orthopedics and traumatology, Clinical centre University of Sarajevo during last three years.The length of postoperative hospitalization in the analyzed group was 7 days, compared with results achieved by other methods. Faster recovery, returning to life activities, final esthetic and functional result were superior, and there was no need for revision surgery.of this work is that posterior corrective spondylodesis by transpedicular screws at the AIS patients is method of choice, if all requirements of correct performing of that method are met.
Submuscular transposition of the ulnar nerve for the treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. - Neurosurgery
THE ULNAR NERVE is compressed at the cubical notch in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome. To definitively alleviate this compression, the nerve can be transposed under the pronator teres and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles. This procedure is also known as medianization of the ulnar nerve because it then courses parallel to the median nerve. In the current article the procedure is described in a step-by-step fashion.
Sacral neuromodulation for chronic pain conditions. - Anesthesiology clinics of North America
Some of the pelvic pain syndromes seem to have features of neurogenic inflammation and neuropathic pain in common. As opposed to being separate disease entities, they may represent a spectrum of clinical presentations of CRPS I of the pelvis. Sacral nerve root stimulation provides good symptomatic relief of pain and voiding dysfunction. The techniques of retrograde root stimulation may offer superior results with fewer complications and lead migrations when compared with other methods. Perhaps neuromodulation should be used earlier in the treatment paradigm for these disorders, before the potentially injurious procedures of hydrodistention, bladder installations, and cystectomies.
Catheter tip granuloma associated with sacral region intrathecal drug administration. - Neuromodulation : journal of the International Neuromodulation Society
Spinal cord compression from catheter tip granulomatous masses following intrathecal drug administration may produce devastating permanent neurologic deficits. Some authors have advocated intrathecal catheter placement below the conus medullaris to avoid the possibility of spinal cord involvement. Multiple cases of catheter tip granulomas in the thoracolumbar region have been reported. We present a unique case of a sacral region catheter tip inflammatory mass producing permanent neurologic deficits. A 71-year-old white male with a diagnosis of failed back surgery syndrome was referred to the senior author for evaluation. After more extensive conservative therapy, including spinal cord stimulation, failed to yield adequate pain relief, he was offered implantation of an intrathecal pump for opioid administration. Excellent pain relief was achieved in the postoperative period; however, three years after implantation, he presented with progressive saddle anesthesia and bowel/bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a space occupying lesion associated with the catheter tip. The patient underwent emergent second level complete sacral laminectomy with partial resection of an intradural extra-axial mass and removal of intrathecal catheter. At discharge, the patient had no restoration of neurologic function. Histologic examination of the mass confirmed a sterile inflammatory mass. It has been suggested that intrathecal catheters be placed below the conus medullaris to avoid the possibility of spinal cord involvement. We present an unusual case documenting devastating permanent neurologic deficits from a catheter tip granuloma in the sacral region.
Results of delayed follow-up imaging in traumatic brain injury. - Journal of neurosurgery
OBJECT There is a paucity of scientific evidence available about the benefits of outpatient follow-up imaging for traumatic brain injury patients. In this study, 1 year of consecutive patients at a Level 1 trauma center were analyzed to determine if there is any benefit to routinely obtaining CT of the head at the outpatient follow-up visit. METHODS This single-institution retrospective review was performed on all patients with a traumatic brain injury seen at a Level 1 trauma center in 2013. Demographic data, types of injuries, surgical interventions, radiographic imaging in inpatient and outpatient settings, and outcomes were assessed through a review of the institution's trauma registry, patient charts, and imaging. RESULTS Five hundred twenty-five patients were seen for traumatic brain injury in 2013 at Regional One Health in Memphis, Tennessee. One hundred eighty-five patients (35%) presented for outpatient follow-up, all with CT scans of the head. Seven of these patients (4%) showed worsening of their intracranial injuries on outpatient imaging studies; however, surgical intervention was recommended for only 3 of these patients (2%). All patients requiring an intervention had neurological deterioration prior to their follow-up appointment. CONCLUSIONS These experiences suggest that outpatient follow-up imaging for traumatic brain injury should be done selectively, as it was not helpful for patients who did not exhibit worsening of neurological signs or symptoms. Furthermore, routine outpatient imaging results in unnecessary resource utilization and radiation exposure.

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6325 Humphreys Blvd Semmes-Murphey Clinic Memphis, TN 38120
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