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Dr. Naim  Maalouf  Md image

Dr. Naim Maalouf Md

5323 Harry Hines Blvd
Dallas TX 75390
214 482-2954
Medical School: Other - 1998
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: M0158
NPI: 1811956188
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X 207RE0101X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Naim Maalouf is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$524.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$200.31
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$516.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$195.84
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$407.55 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$161.29
HCPCS Code:77080 Description:Dxa bone density axial Average Price:$306.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$63.81
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$351.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$133.27
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$269.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$76.51
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$269.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.89
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$188.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$49.84
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$188.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.96
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$185.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.09
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$102.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$38.25

HCPCS Code Definitions

99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
77080
Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bone density study, 1 or more sites; axial skeleton (eg, hips, pelvis, spine)
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1881646982
Nephrology
939
1205856366
Pulmonary Disease
440
1487623963
Nephrology
430
1164443727
Diagnostic Radiology
242
1215912399
Internal Medicine
200
1316904717
Diagnostic Radiology
191
1124082854
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
188
1194769133
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
152
1487756532
Diagnostic Radiology
134
1952366676
Diagnostic Radiology
130
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Maalouf has made to other doctors

Publications

Hepatitis C virus coinfection as a risk factor for osteoporosis and fracture. - Current opinion in HIV and AIDS
With increased survival of HIV-infected patients, osteoporotic fractures have developed as a major cause of morbidity in these patients, and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection has emerged as a significant contributor to this increased fracture risk. The present article reviews the epidemiologic and clinical evidence for osteoporosis and increased fracture risk among HIV/HCV coinfected patients, and potential mechanisms for these outcomes with HCV coinfection.Epidemiologic studies suggest that HIV/HCV coinfected patients exhibit a three-fold increased fracture incidence compared with uninfected controls, and 1.2-2.4-fold increased fracture risk compared with HIV monoinfected patients. Recent reports suggest that chronic HCV coinfection is independently associated with reduced bone mineral density in HIV, but that it is not associated with significantly increased bone turnover. The deleterious impact of chronic HCV on BMD and fracture risk occurs even in the absence of advanced liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. New tools to assess bone quality, including the trabecular bone score, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and in-vivo microindentation, may help improve understanding of the mechanisms of HCV-associated skeletal fragility. The impact of approved antiosteoporosis medications and direct-acting antivirals for the treatment of chronic HCV infection on patients' bone health remain to be studied.Chronic HCV infection is an independent risk factor for osteoporosis and fractures among HIV-infected patients, even before the development of cirrhosis. The underlying mechanisms are being unraveled, but major questions persist regarding the optimal evaluation and management of bone health in HIV/HCV coinfected patients.
Assessment of urinary inhibitor or promoter activity in uric acid nephrolithiasis. - The Journal of urology
To assess the presence of a reduced inhibitor activity or an increased promoter activity in urine of idiopathic uric acid stone formers (IUASF) compared to non-stone formers (NSF) independent of urinary pH.30 IUASF, 9 obese NSF and 12 lean NSF collected 24-hour urine under metabolic diet. Three urine aliquots per subject were used to assess spontaneous nucleation (SN, de novo crystal formation), crystal growth (CG) using a 0.1 mg/mL seed of anhydrous uric acid (UA) and steady state (SS) of UA solubility using a 5 mg/mL seed of UA (assessing maximum amount of UA dissolvable in urine). All experiments were conducted for 6 hours at a constant pH of 5.0. UA concentration was measured in filtered aliquots at 0, 3 and 6 hours.At baseline, 24-hour urinary pH was significantly lower and UA saturation significantly higher in IUASF. No significant SN occurred and a similar SS UA concentration was reached in the three groups. IUASF and lean NSF displayed a similar decrease in UA concentration during CG, while obese NSF started with higher UA concentration and consequently displayed higher magnitude of decrease in UA concentration for CG.This study suggests that there is no significant difference between IUASF and NSF in terms of promoter or inhibitor activity in whole urine against UA stone formation when urine pH is maintained constant. The findings suggest that UA stone formation is dictated by a high urinary saturation with respect to UA, driven primarily by a low urine pH.Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Mechanisms of bone disease in HIV and hepatitis C virus: impact of bone turnover, tenofovir exposure, sex steroids and severity of liver disease. - AIDS (London, England)
Both HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are associated with higher osteoporotic fracture risk. Increased bone turnover, liver fibrosis, tenofovir (TDF) use or hormonal imbalances are possible underlying mechanisms.This prospective, cross-sectional study assessed 298 male volunteers with either virologically suppressed HIV or untreated HCV mono-infections, HIV/HCV co-infection and noninfected controls.Study participants underwent bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and measurement of bone turnover markers [BTM: C-telopeptide (CTX) and osteocalcin (OC)], insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), the sex steroids testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2), and the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI). Impact of HIV and HCV status on BMD was evaluated in multivariate models adjusting for APRI score, BTM, TDF exposure, IGF-1, and sex steroids.HIV and HCV status independently predicted lower BMD, controlling for age, race, BMI, and smoking (P = 0.017 and P = 0.010, respectively), whereas APRI did not (P = 0.84). HIV was associated with increased bone resorption (CTX: P < 0.001) and formation (OC: P = 0.014), whereas HCV infection was not associated with CTX (P = 0.30) or OC (P = 0.36). TDF exposure was associated with lower BMD (P < 0.01). IGF-1 was significantly decreased in HCV and increased in HIV. Tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.98), IGF-1 (P = 0.80), bioavailable T (P = 0.45) and E2 (P = 0.27) were not associated with BMD and did not attenuate the impact of HIV or HCV on BMD.HIV and TDF exposure decrease BMD through increased bone turnover, although the lower BMD in HCV is not explained by a high turnover state. Neither virus' effect on BMD is likely mediated through increased inflammation, liver fibrosis, IGF-1, or sex steroids.
Relationship between serum uric Acid and bone mineral density in the general population and in rats with experimental hyperuricemia. - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
Higher serum uric acid concentrations have been associated with higher bone mineral density (BMD) in observational studies of older men and perimenopausal or postmenopausal women, prompting speculation of a potential protective effect of uric acid on bone. Whether this relationship is present in the general population has not been examined and there is no data to support causality. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of a probability sample of the U.S.Demographic data, dietary intake, lifestyle risk factors and physical activity assessment data, serum biochemistry including serum uric acid, and BMD were obtained from 6759 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; 2005-2010) participants over 30 years of age. In unadjusted analyses, higher serum uric acid levels were associated with higher BMD at the femoral neck, total hip, and lumbar spine in men, premenopausal women, and postmenopausal women not treated with estrogen. However, these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders, including age, body mass index (BMI), black race, alcohol consumption, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), serum alkaline phosphatase, and C-reactive protein (CRP). This is in contradistinction to some prevailing conclusions in the literature. To further examine the causal effect of higher serum uric acid on skeletal health, including biomechanical properties that are not measurable in humans, we used an established rat model of inducible mild hyperuricemia. There were no differences in BMD, bone volume density, and bone biomechanical properties between hyperuricemic rats and normouricemic control animals. Taken together, our data do not support the hypothesis that higher serum uric acid has protective effects on bone health.© 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
The RADAR study: week 48 safety and efficacy of RAltegravir combined with boosted DARunavir compared to tenofovir/emtricitabine combined with boosted darunavir in antiretroviral-naive patients. Impact on bone health. - PloS one
NRTI-sparing regimens may avoid long-term mitochondrial, bone and renal toxicities and maintain viral suppression.In the RADAR study, 85 antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected patients were randomized to receive either raltegravir (RAL) (n = 42) or tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) (n = 43), each with ritonavir-boosted darunavir (DRV/r). Virologic efficacy was assessed at weeks 24 and 48. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan at baseline and week 48, and bone turnover markers (BTM) assessed at weeks 0, 16 and 48.Using an intention-to-treat analysis, 62.5% of RAL subjects and 83.7% of TDF/FTC subjects were responders (VL<48 copies/mL) at week 48 (p = 0.045; chi-square test). The proportions of patients achieving VL<200 copies/mL were similar: 72.5% and 86.0% (p = 0.175). Premature treatment discontinuation was the main cause for failure. No treatment-emergent resistance was observed. Changes from baseline in RAL vs. TDF/FTC for CD4+ (+199 vs. +216 cells/µL, p = 0.63), total cholesterol/HDL (-0.25 vs. -0.71 mg/dL (p = 0.270), and eGFR (-4.4 vs. -7.9 ml/min, p = 0.44) were comparable between groups. Changes in subtotal BMD to week 48 were: +9.2 with RAL vs. -7 g/cm2 with TDF/FTC (p = 0.002). Mean CTX changes were +0.04 vs. +0.24 ng/mL (p = 0.001), and mean P1NP changes were +3.59 vs. +30.09 ng/mL (p = 0.023). BTM changes at week 16 predicted change in BMD by week 48 (R = -0.394, p = 0.003 for CTX; and R = -0.477, p<0.001 for P1NP).The NRTI-sparing regimen RAL+DRV/r did not achieve similar week 48 virologic efficacy compared with TDF/FTC+DRV/r, but was better with regard to markers of bone health.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00677300.
Salt and nephrolithiasis. - Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
Dietary sodium chloride intake is nowadays globally known as one of the major threats for cardiovascular health. However, there is also important evidence that it may influence idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis onset and recurrence. Higher salt intake has been associated with hypercalciuria and hypocitraturia, which are major risk factors for calcium stone formation. Dietary salt restriction can be an effective means for secondary prevention of nephrolithiasis as well. Thus in this paper, we review the complex relationship between salt and nephrolithiasis, pointing out the difference between dietary sodium and salt intake and the best methods to assess them, highlighting the main findings of epidemiologic, laboratory and intervention studies and focusing on open issues such as the role of dietary salt in secondary causes of nephrolithiasis.© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.
Use of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to calculate the impact of obesity and diabetes on cost and prevalence of urolithiasis in 2030. - European urology
The prevalence of urolithiasis and its risk factors such as obesity and diabetes have increased over time.Determine the future cost and prevalence of kidney stones using current and projected estimates for stones, obesity, diabetes, and population rates.The stone prevalence in 2000 was estimated from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1988-1994 and 2007-2010. The cost per percentage prevalence of stones in 2000, calculated using Urologic Diseases in America Project data, was used to estimate the annual cost of stones in 2030, adjusting for inflation and increases in population, stone prevalence, obesity and diabetes rates.The primary outcome was prevalence and cost of stones in 2030. The secondary outcomes were the impact of obesity and diabetes on these values, calculated using odds ratios for stones by body mass index and diabetes status.The annual cost of stone disease in 2000, adjusted for inflation to 2014 US dollars, was approximately $2.81 billion. After accounting for increases in population and stone prevalence from 2000, the estimated cost of stones in 2007 in 2014 US dollars was $3.79 billion. Future population growth alone would increase the cost of stone disease by $780 million in 2030. Based on projected estimates for 2030, obesity will independently increase stone prevalence by 0.36%, with an annual cost increase of $157 million. Diabetes will independently increase stone prevalence by 0.72%, associated with a cost increase of $308 million annually by 2030. NHANES data, however, capture patient self-assessment rather than medical diagnosis, which is a potential bias.The rising prevalence of obesity and diabetes, together with population growth, is projected to contribute to dramatic increases in the cost of urolithiasis, with an additional $1.24 billion/yr estimated by 2030.Obesity, diabetes, and population rates will contribute to an estimated $1.24 billion/yr increase in the cost of kidney stones by 2030.Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
The impact of obesity on the presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism. - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
Obesity has been associated with elevated serum PTH (sPTH) in the general population. Obesity may also alter the clinical presentation in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT).The objectives of the study were to compare the clinical presentation of obese (OB) vs nonobese (NO) PHPT patients and to assess the impact of obesity on the presentation of PHPT independent of serum calcium and PTH.Consecutive PHPT patients who underwent parathyroidectomy between 2003 and 2012 by a single surgical group participated in the study.The study was conducted at an academic medical center.Cross-sectional review of records of preoperative demographic, historical, laboratory, and densitometry findings and intraoperative pathological findings were compared in OB vs NO patients.The prevalence of nephrolithiasis and osteoporosis was measured.Two hundred forty-seven PHPT patients were included in this analysis. Fifty percent were OB and 79% were women. Mean body mass index was 25.3 ± 3.3 and 36.0 ± 5.2 kg/m(2) in the NO and OB groups, respectively. Age, gender, and race distribution was similar between the two groups. Serum calcium was similar between the groups (11.0 ± 0.7 mg/dL in NO vs 11.1 ± 0.9 mg/dL in OB, P = .13), whereas sPTH was higher in OB (151 ± 70 vs 136 ± 69 pg/mL, P = .03). The OB group exhibited higher prevalence of hypercalciuria (urine calcium > 400 mg per 24 h) (41% vs 23% in NO, P = .01) and nephrolithiasis (36% vs 21% in NO, P = .03). Despite higher sPTH, OB patients showed higher bone mineral density and a lower rate of osteoporosis (21% vs 35%, P = .05). Differences in the prevalence of hypercalciuria and osteoporosis between the groups persisted after adjustment for age, race, estimated glomerular filtration rate, gender, sPTH, and calcium.In PHPT patients, obesity is a risk factor for hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis and is protective against osteoporosis. The impact of parathyroidectomy on the clinical features of obese PHPT patients merits further evaluation.
Animal protein and the risk of kidney stones: a comparative metabolic study of animal protein sources. - The Journal of urology
We compared the effect of 3 animal protein sources on urinary stone risk.A total of 15 healthy subjects completed a 3-phase randomized, crossover metabolic study. During each 1-week phase subjects consumed a standard metabolic diet containing beef, chicken or fish. Serum chemistry and 24-hour urine samples collected at the end of each phase were compared using mixed model repeated measures analysis.Serum and urinary uric acid were increased for each phase. Beef was associated with lower serum uric acid than chicken or fish (6.5 vs 7.0 and 7.3 mg/dl, respectively, each p <0.05). Fish was associated with higher urinary uric acid than beef or chicken (741 vs 638 and 641 mg per day, p = 0.003 and 0.04, respectively). No significant difference among phases was noted in urinary pH, sulfate, calcium, citrate, oxalate or sodium. Mean saturation index for calcium oxalate was highest for beef (2.48), although the difference attained significance only compared to chicken (1.67, p = 0.02) but not to fish (1.79, p = 0.08).Consuming animal protein is associated with increased serum and urine uric acid in healthy individuals. The higher purine content of fish compared to beef or chicken is reflected in higher 24-hour urinary uric acid. However, as reflected in the saturation index, the stone forming propensity is marginally higher for beef compared to fish or chicken. Stone formers should be advised to limit the intake of all animal proteins, including fish.Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Body fat content and distribution and urinary risk factors for nephrolithiasis. - Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN
Obesity is associated with a higher risk of nephrolithiasis. However, it is not known whether higher body fat mass or abnormal fat distribution influences stone risk independent of dietary factors.In this cross-sectional study, non-stone-forming men with no known kidney disease and with a wide range of body weight collected a 24-hour urine specimen while consuming a fixed metabolic diet. They underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry to assess body composition and fat distribution. Urinary risk factors for nephrolithiasis and urine saturation with respect to calcium oxalate and uric acid (assessed as supersaturation index [SI]) were correlated with various measures of adiposity.Study participants included 21 men with a mean age of 52.1 years, mean weight of 91.1 kg, and mean total fat mass of 24.3 kg. Twenty-four-hour urine pH and SI uric acid were more closely correlated with fat mass than with lean mass or total body weight. Both 24-hour urine pH and SI uric acid were also significantly correlated with truncal fat mass but not with leg fat mass. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation between truncal/leg fat mass and NH4(+)/net acid excretion ratio (R=-0.62; P=0.009). However, there was no significant association between SI calcium oxalate and body weight, lean mass, fat mass, trunk fat mass, or leg fat mass.The association between 24-hour urine pH and SI uric acid and various measures of adiposity suggest that total body fat and trunk fat are more strongly associated with risk factors for uric acid stone formation than are total body weight and lean body mass. Under a controlled metabolic diet, adiposity is not associated with risk factors for calcium oxalate stones. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings in larger populations that include women and patients who form stones.

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5323 Harry Hines Blvd Dallas, TX 75390
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