Docality.com Logo
 
Dr. Haider  Asad  Md image

Dr. Haider Asad Md

2545 Schoenersville Rd Fl 1
Bethlehem PA 18017
727 496-6612
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: MD426740
NPI: 1811190838
Taxonomy Codes:
207ZP0102X

Request Appointment Information

Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

None Found

Publications

Mixed corticomedullary carcinoma of the adrenal gland: a case report. - Endocrine practice : official journal of the American College of Endocrinology and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists
To report the case of a 78-year-old woman with mixed corticomedullary carcinoma of the adrenal gland, and to review other reported lesions that exhibit clinical and/or histopathologic features of both adrenal cortical and medullary differentiation.We describe the patient's clinical findings and laboratory test results, as well as the gross and histopathologic features of her tumor. We also review the literature pertaining to mixed corticomedullary adenomas and cortical tumors with clinical features of pheochromocytoma, and vice versa.A 78-year-old woman with a 10-cm left adrenal mass was hospitalized for management of hypertensive urgency. Laboratory workup revealed elevated urinary metanephrine excretion and elevated serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels. She underwent left adrenalectomy. Pathologic examination of the lesion showed mixed cortical and medullary histologic characteristics, as well as gross and microscopic evidence of malignancy. Including the present case, we identified 17 cases of neoplasms that exhibit features of mixed corticomedullary differentiation.This report represents the first documented case of mixed corticomedullary carcinoma. Several benign lesions combine clinical, biochemical, and/or histopathologic evidence of both adrenal cortical and medullary differentiation, including mixed corticomedullary adenomas and corticotropin-secreting pheochromocytomas. The differential diagnosis of a lesion with mixed cortical and medullary features should also include a malignant neoplasm.
Histopathologic prognostic factors in stage I leiomyosarcoma of the uterus: a detailed analysis of 27 cases. - The American journal of surgical pathology
Uterine leiomyosarcomas (Ut-LMSs) are aggressive tumors with an overall poor prognosis (15% to 25% 5-year survival rate). However, patients with stage I Ut-LMSs are reported to have a relatively better outcome when compared with the overall group with a 5-year survival rate ranging from 25% to 75%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathologic parameters that may impact outcome in stage I Ut-LMSs. Twenty-seven patients with stage I Ut-LMSs were identified from the files of 5 tertiary care hospitals between 1974 and 2006. Tumors were primarily staged based on pathologic information, supplemented with radiologic findings (10 cases) and clinical records (1 case). Patients with stage I tumors with no additional clinical or radiologic staging information were included in the study if no recurrence was documented after 6 months from the initial staging operation (16 cases). Clinicopathologic parameters that were statistically evaluated included age [mean, 54 y (37 to 73)], tumor size [mean, 9.5 cm (5.5 to 16)], cell type (17 spindled, 5 epithelioid, 2 myxoid, and 3 mixed), mitotic activity [mean count, 24 (4 to 69)/10 high-power fields], marked cytologic atypia (26 of 27 cases), tumor cell necrosis (12 of 27 cases), and lymphovascular invasion (6 of 27 cases). Follow-up was available for all the patients. Poor outcome was defined when patients either died of disease or were alive with disease. Overall, accounting for any length of follow-up, 16 of 27 (59%) patients with stage I Ut-LMSs had poor outcome; 7 died of disease (mean follow-up, 13 mo) and 9 were alive with disease (mean follow-up, 31 mo). The remaining 11 patients were alive and well with a mean follow-up of 48 months. However, at 2 years of follow-up by univariate analysis, only nonspindle morphology (P<0.0183) and diffuse high-grade cytologic atypia (P<0.02) were statistically associated with poor outcome. No statistically significant association with survival was identified by univariate analysis when evaluating mean age, mean tumor size, presence of tumor cell necrosis, mean mitotic count, or lymphovascular invasion. In conclusion, stage I leiomyosarcoma is associated with poor prognosis. No conclusive differences were observed among different clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis, although it seemed that spindle cell morphology and diffuse high-grade cytologic atypia were associated with longer overall survival and higher death rates, respectively.
A limited panel of immunomarkers can reliably distinguish between clear cell and high-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary. - The American journal of surgical pathology
The distinction of ovarian clear cell carcinomas (CCCs) from high-grade serous carcinomas (HG-SCs) is sometimes a diagnostic challenge. With the recognition that CCCs respond poorly to conventional chemotherapy there are efforts to initiate clinical trials for CCC, making accurate diagnosis critical. The purpose of this study was to test and validate a set of antibodies that could aid in the diagnosis of CCC, using a series of cases from different centers in North America. Using a test set of 133 CCCs, we identified the following markers: Cyclin E, estrogen receptor, hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1beta, Ki-67, p21, p53, and Wilms tumor (WT)1 that show significant discrimination from 200 HG-SCs. For validation, these markers were characterized on an independent set of 104 CCCs from 3 other centers. There were no significant differences in expression of these 7 markers between the independent test and validation sets of CCC. Combining all CCC cases (N=237), HNF-1beta showed the highest sensitivity (82.5%) and specificity (95.2%) for CCC, and WT1 for HG-SC (sensitivity: 79.9%, specificity: 97.4%). A diagnostic panel consisting of WT1, ER, and HNF-1beta demonstrated nearly identical performance as a panel using all 7 markers in distinguishing CCCs from HG-SCs, correctly classifying 84% of cases. Three percent of cases were misclassified and 13% carried an uninformative triple negative immunophenotype. CCCs show a distinct, reproducible immunophenotype, compared with HG-SCs, and a panel of 3 immunomarkers can serve as a diagnostic aid in problematic cases.
Variants in hormone biosynthesis genes and risk of endometrial cancer. - Cancer causes & control : CCC
We investigated the risk associated with variants in three genes involved in estrogen biosynthesis, CYP11A1, CYP17A1, and CYP19A1, in the population-based case-control study of Estrogen, Diet, Genetics, and Endometrial Cancer. This study was conducted in New Jersey in 2001-2006 with 417 cases and 402 controls. For CYP11A1, there was no association between the number of [TTTTA]( n ) repeats (D15S520) and risk. For CYP17A1, risk was somewhat lower among women with the C/C genotype at T-34C (rs743572) (adjusted OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.41-1.02). For CYP19A1, risk was lower among women homozygous for the 3-bp deletion (rs11575899) in exon 4 (adjusted OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.26-0.76), while the number of [TTTA]( n ) repeats was not significantly related to risk: the adjusted OR for n = 7/7 repeats versus n > 7/>7 repeats was 0.81 (95% CI 0.54-1.23). In stratified analyses, results for CYP19A1 were stronger among women with higher (> or =27.4) body mass index: for the homozygous deletion, OR = 0.30 (95% CI 0.15-0.62); for the n = 7/7 genotype, OR = 0.49 (95% CI 0.26-0.93). The interaction between the n = 7/7 genotype and BMI was statistically significant (p = 0.01). The insertion/deletion variant in CYP19A1 appears to be related to risk of endometrial cancer; risk associated with variants in this gene may vary according to BMI.
Tactile-like corpuscles in gastric mucosa: a case report. - World journal of surgical oncology
The presence of tactile corpuscle-like structures in Schwannomas, Neurofibromas and Neuroid Intradermal Melanocytic Nevi is well-documented. We report a case describing the presence of such structures in the lamina propria of grossly normal gastric mucosa.A 30 year-old male underwent esophagogastrectomy for carcinoma. Examination of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections reveal tactile corpuscle-like structures in the mucosa adjacent to the main tumor mass.This is a rare phenomenon and a literature search revealed only one paper describing such structures in the benign colonic mucosa of a colectomy done for carcinoma. We did not come across any cases in the literature describing such structures in gastrointestinal specimen resected for reasons other than carcinoma. To our knowledge this would be the first case reporting the existence of tactile corpuscles-like structures in gastric mucosa.
Anti-cytokeratin 20 staining of Merkel cells helps differentiate basaloid proliferations overlying dermatofibromas from basal cell carcinoma. - Journal of cutaneous pathology
Basaloid epidermal proliferations (BEP), morphologically resembling basal cell carcinoma (BCC), have been described overlying dermatofibromas. Distinguishing the two is important because of non-aggressiveness of BEP and local aggressiveness of BCC. The aim of this study is to determine whether CK20 antibody staining for Merkel cells can be used as an adjunct method to differentiate BEP from BCC.Ten cases of BEP overlying dermatofibromas were selected. Ten cases of BCC were used as control. The two groups were stained with CK20 antibody. Numerical density of CK20 stained Merkel cells in peri-lesional epidermis, BEP and BCC was determined by examining 300 cells at 400X in two separate areas by three independent pathologists. To determine statistical significance, the results were compared using t-test method.Density of Merkel cells in peri-lesional epidermis was 0.2-0.3%. No merkel cells were detected in the BCC. BEP overlying dermatofibromas showed an obvious increase in CK 20 stained Merkel cells. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.02) CONCLUSIONS: We report a significant increase in CK20 stained Merkel cells in BEP overlying dermatofibromas as compared to BCC. CK20 antibody staining for Merkel cells can be used as an adjunct method to differentiate BEP overlying dermatofibromas from BCC. Mahmoodi M, Asad H, Salim S, Kantor G, Minimo C. Anti-CK20 staining of Merkel cells helps differentiate basaloid proliferations overlying dermatofibromas from basal cell carcinoma.
Renal siderosis in donor allograft: pathologic and clinical sequelae. - American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
Transplantation of a cadaver kidney with marked siderosis and its outcome has not been reported. Increasing use of marginal kidneys has become common practice to expand the donor pool to meet the growing demand and will lead to increased recognition of kidney disease in cadaver donors with an unknown effect on graft outcome. This is a case report of a recipient of a cadaver kidney with marked siderosis monitored by surveillance biopsies and evaluated by clinico-pathological correlation. The recipient continued to have transplant kidney function, and a surveillance biopsy shows the natural course of the pathologic resolution of renal siderosis.

Map & Directions

2545 Schoenersville Rd Fl 1 Bethlehem, PA 18017
View Directions In Google Maps

Nearby Doctors

3445 High Point Blvd Suite 400
Bethlehem, PA 18017
610 665-5555
2775 Schoenersville Rd
Bethlehem, PA 18017
610 618-8080
2545 Schoenersville Rd
Bethlehem, PA 18017
484 842-2888
2545 Schoenersville Rd
Bethlehem, PA 18017
484 842-2888
2545 Schoenersville Rd
Bethlehem, PA 18017
484 842-2888
3894 Courtney St Suite # 105
Bethlehem, PA 18017
610 172-2400
2545 Schoenersville Rd
Bethlehem, PA 18017
484 842-2888
2775 Schoenersville Rd
Bethlehem, PA 18017
610 618-8080
2545 Schoenersville Rd Banko Community Center
Bethlehem, PA 18017
484 845-5783
2830 Easton Ave
Bethlehem, PA 18017
484 263-3555