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Dr. Amjad  Almahameed  Md,Mph image

Dr. Amjad Almahameed Md,Mph

1 Deaconess Rd Baker 4
Boston MA 02115
617 327-7000
Medical School: Other - 1993
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #:
NPI: 1780793828
Taxonomy Codes:
207RC0000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Amjad Almahameed is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:92980 Description:Insert intracoronary stent Average Price:$2,560.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$851.02
HCPCS Code:93458 Description:L hrt artery/ventricle angio Average Price:$959.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$253.57
HCPCS Code:93455 Description:Coronary art/grft angio s&i Average Price:$908.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$227.36
HCPCS Code:93454 Description:Coronary artery angio s&i Average Price:$785.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$175.24
HCPCS Code:99291 Description:Critical care first hour Average Price:$673.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$224.68
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$609.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$203.21
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$506.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$169.08
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$414.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$138.24
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$395.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$131.90
HCPCS Code:99292 Description:Critical care addl 30 min Average Price:$337.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$112.61
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$335.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$111.79
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$312.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.32
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$238.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$79.49
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$218.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$72.81
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$154.57 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$51.79
HCPCS Code:93010 Description:Electrocardiogram report Average Price:$27.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.87

HCPCS Code Definitions

99291
Critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient; first 30-74 minutes
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99292
Critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient; each additional 30 minutes (List separately in addition to code for primary service)
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
93454
Catheter placement in coronary artery(s) for coronary angiography, including intraprocedural injection(s) for coronary angiography, imaging supervision and interpretation
93010
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; interpretation and report only
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
93458
Catheter placement in coronary artery(s) for coronary angiography, including intraprocedural injection(s) for coronary angiography, imaging supervision and interpretation; with left heart catheterization including intraprocedural injection(s) for left ventriculography, when performed
93455
Catheter placement in coronary artery(s) for coronary angiography, including intraprocedural injection(s) for coronary angiography, imaging supervision and interpretation; with catheter placement(s) in bypass graft(s) (internal mammary, free arterial, venous grafts) including intraprocedural injection(s) for bypass graft angiography

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1184661878
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
849
1285671800
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
812
1659339588
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
792
1730161142
Nephrology
785
1053358747
Diagnostic Radiology
758
1013943026
Diagnostic Radiology
665
1427080944
Internal Medicine
575
1952358335
Internal Medicine
553
1750366977
Pulmonary Disease
524
1992742779
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
492
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Almahameed has made to other doctors

Publications

Association of angiographic perfusion score following percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-elevation myocardial infarction with left ventricular remodeling at 6 weeks in GRACIA-2. - Journal of thrombosis and thrombolysis
Higher angiographic perfusion score (APS) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been shown to be associated with improved clinical outcomes. The association between APS after STEMI and left ventricular remodeling as assessed by volumetric parameters derived from left ventriculography has not been assessed.The APS (the arithmetic sum of the TIMI Flow Grade (TFG) and TIMI Myocardial Perfusion grade (TMPG) before and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), range of 0-12) was assessed in 168 patients from the GRACIA-2 trial. Left ventriculograms performed in the 30 degrees right anterior oblique projection were obtained among 148 patients at initial angiography (prior to PCI) and at 6 weeks. The association of APS with markers of left ventricular remodeling at 6-weeks was examined using left ventricular ejection fraction, delta end systolic volume, delta stroke volume and wall motion index.Full perfusion (APS 10-12), as compared to partial perfusion (APS 4-9) or failed perfusion (APS 0-3), was associated with a greater left ventricular ejection fraction (61.6% +/- 10.0 vs. 56.9% +/- 12.5 vs. 49.8% +/- 16.9, P = 0.015), a decrease in left ventricular end systolic volume indicating favorable remodeling (mean -4.1 cc +/- 17.3 vs. +2.0 cc +/- 17.3 vs. +9.8 cc +/- 16.1, P = 0.015), a greater improvement in left ventricular stroke volume (mean +13.7 cc +/- 17.1 vs. +6.7 cc +/- 15.5 vs. +1.2 cc +/- 13.4, P = 0.009) and a decreased wall motion index (number of chords in the hypokinetic region) (mean 15.1 +/- 16.4 vs. 21.4 +/- 20.5 vs. 32.9 +/- 22.1, P = 0.026) at 6 weeks.In conclusion, among patients treated with combined reperfusion and revascularization strategies for STEMI, higher APS is associated with more favorable markers of left ventricular remodeling and improved 6-week left ventricular function.
Pernio (chilblains). - Current treatment options in cardiovascular medicine
Pernio is a vasospastic disorder that affects unprotected skin regions of individuals exposed to nonfreezing, damp cold. It may be idiopathic or associated with other systemic diseases, particularly cryopathies and lupus erythematosus. Acute pernio manifests several hours following exposure, whereas chronic pernio may persist even after the cold season has long ended. The pathophysiology is complex and related to patient and environmental factors. Pernio is diagnosed by clinical features. There are no characteristic histopathologic features that confirm the diagnosis, but biopsy of affected areas may exclude the presence of other disorders. Sequelae include superinfection, depigmentation, and scarring. Treatment involves rewarming of the whole body and avoidance of further exposure to cold. The use of the dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker nifedipine promotes faster healing and prevents recurrence.
Outpatient management of stable acute pulmonary embolism: proposed accelerated pathway for risk stratification. - The American journal of medicine
Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major health problem and a cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. The current standard therapy for acute PE encourages admitting patients to the hospital for administration of parenteral anticoagulation therapy as a bridge to oral vitamin K antagonists. Prognostic models that identify patients with stable (nonmassive) acute PE (SPE) who are at low risk for adverse outcome have recently been reported. Based on these risk stratification models, hospital-based therapy is warranted for patients with PE who meet the criteria associated with a high risk for adverse outcome. However, a growing body of evidence suggests the feasibility of partial outpatient management and accelerated hospital discharge (AHD) in a subset of patients with SPE. Prospective validation of these risk stratification models for predicting patient suitability for AHD is needed.
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists for the Prevention of Adverse events following percutaneous coronary Revascularization--results of the PPAR study. - American heart journal
Patients with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for cardiovascular complications. We sought to determine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists had any beneficial effect on patients with metabolic syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).A total of 200 patients with metabolic syndrome undergoing PCI were randomized to rosiglitazone or placebo and followed for 1 year. Carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT), inflammatory markers, lipid levels, brain natriuretic peptide, and clinical events were measured at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months.There was no significant difference in CIMT between the 2 groups. There was no difference in the 12-month composite end point of death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, or any recurrent ischemia (31.4% vs 30.2%, P = .99). The rate of death, MI, or stroke at 12 months was numerically lower in the rosiglitazone group (11.9% vs 6.4%, P = .19). There was a trend toward a greater decrease over time in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein values compared with baseline in the group randomized to rosiglitazone versus placebo both at 6 months (-35.4% vs -15.8%, P = .059) and 12 months (-40.0% vs -20.9%, P = .089) and higher change in high-density lipoprotein (+15.5% vs +4.1%, P = .05) and lower triglycerides (-13.9% vs +14.9%, P = .004) in the rosiglitazone arm. There was a trend toward less new onset diabetes in the rosiglitazone group (0% vs 3.3%, P = .081) and no episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia. There was no excess of new onset of clinical heart failure in the rosiglitazone group, nor was there a significant change in brain natriuretic peptide levels.Patients with metabolic syndrome presenting for PCI are at increased risk for subsequent cardiovascular events. Rosiglitazone for 12 months did not appear to affect CIMT in this population, although it did have beneficial effects on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. Further study of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonism in patients with metabolic syndrome undergoing PCI may be warranted.
Contemporary management of peripheral arterial disease: III. Endovascular and surgical management. - Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine
Traditional indications for invasive treatment in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have been salvage of a threatened limb or improvement of functional capacity in cases of disabling intermittent claudication, but advances in interventional therapy may be lowering the threshold for these therapies. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), with or without stent placement, is the most common endovascular intervention in patients with occlusive lower extremity PAD. In general, PTA is best suited to cases of short-segment stenosis or large-bore vessels, whereas surgery is best applied to multilevel occlusions involving smaller and more distant vessels. This article reviews endovascular therapy, catheter-based thrombolysis, and surgical revascularization procedures in patients with PAD, with special attention to recommendations from new American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.
Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in the critical care setting: diagnosis and management. - Critical care medicine
Thrombocytopenia is a common occurrence in critical illness, reported in up to 41% of patients. Systematic evaluation of thrombocytopenia in critical care is essential to accurate identification and management of the cause. Although sepsis and hemodilution are more common etiologies of thrombocytopenia in critical illness, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is one potential etiology that warrants consideration.This review will summarize the pathogenesis and clinical consequences of HIT, describe the diagnostic process, and review currently available treatment options.MEDLINE/PubMed search of all relevant primary and review articles.HIT is a clinicopathologic syndrome characterized by thrombocytopenia (>/=50% from baseline) that typically occurs between days 5 and 14 after initiation of heparin. This temporal profile suggests a possible diagnosis of HIT, which can be supported (or refuted) with a strong positive (or negative) laboratory test for HIT antibodies. When considering the diagnosis of HIT, critical care professionals should monitor platelet counts in patients who are at risk for HIT and carefully evaluate for, a) temporal features of the thrombocytopenia in relation to heparin exposure; b) severity of thrombocytopenia; c) clinical evidence for thrombosis; and d) alternative etiologies of thrombocytopenia. Due to its prothrombotic nature, early recognition of HIT and prompt substitution of heparin with a direct thrombin inhibitor (e.g., argatroban or lepirudin) or the heparinoid danaparoid (where available) reduces the risk of thromboembolic events, some of which may be life-threatening.
Peripheral arterial disease: recognition and medical management. - Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine
Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is common but has a variable presentation and is often unrecognized and undertreated. Patients with PAD have an increased risk of cardiovascular events and death. The ankle-brachial index is a quick, reliable diagnostic tool that also helps assess disease severity and prognosis. Treatment goals for PAD are to improve symptoms, enhance functional performance, prevent limb amputation, and reduce cardiovascular complications.
Should we screen for abdominal aortic aneurysms? - Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine
Ultrasonography can screen for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) safely, cheaply, and accurately. Once detected, an AAA can be monitored and repaired before it is likely to rupture. The US Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended a one-time screening for AAAs by ultrasonography for men age 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked. We should consider expanding the recommendations to include others at risk.
Managing abdominal aortic aneurysms: treat the aneurysm and the risk factors. - Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine
Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are not only a danger in themselves, they also signify underlying vascular disease that warrants intensive cardiovascular risk reduction, especially smoking cessation. Aneurysmal size and the patient's fitness for surgery are the main determinants of timing and method of elective repair. The choice of open surgery vs endovascular repair depends on the patient's condition, preference, and life expectancy, and the surgeon's experience.
Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: principles for early recognition and management. - Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine
Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a potentially devastating complication of therapy with either unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin. Thrombocytopenia is no longer essential for the diagnosis of HIT, since a 50% drop in the platelet count may be a more specific indicator. Once HIT is clinically suspected, heparin should be stopped immediately and direct thrombin inhibitor therapy started; waiting for laboratory confirmation may be catastrophic.

Map & Directions

1 Deaconess Rd Baker 4 Boston, MA 02115
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