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Dr. Andrew  Chao  Do image

Dr. Andrew Chao Do

16671 Yorba Linda Blvd Suite 100
Yorba Linda CA 92886
714 856-6400
Medical School: Kirksville College Of Osteopathic Medicine - 1979
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1780621755
Taxonomy Codes:
207Q00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Andrew Chao is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$139.06 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$101.55
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$94.51 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.67
HCPCS Code:83036 Description:Glycosylated hemoglobin test Average Price:$33.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.75
HCPCS Code:Q2038 Description:Fluzone vacc, 3 yrs & >, im Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.05
HCPCS Code:85610 Description:Prothrombin time Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$5.56
HCPCS Code:98926 Description:Osteopathic manipulation Average Price:$55.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$42.54
HCPCS Code:90732 Description:Pneumococcal vaccine Average Price:$72.91 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$61.35
HCPCS Code:G0008 Description:Admin influenza virus vac Average Price:$32.88 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$23.54
HCPCS Code:81002 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/o scope Average Price:$12.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$2.96
HCPCS Code:82044 Description:Microalbumin semiquant Average Price:$15.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$6.48
HCPCS Code:G0009 Description:Admin pneumococcal vaccine Average Price:$31.13 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$23.54

HCPCS Code Definitions

Q2038
Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (fluzone)
G0009
Administration of pneumococcal vaccine
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
G0008
Administration of influenza virus vaccine
98926
Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT); 3-4 body regions involved

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

None Found

Publications

Treatment with immunosuppressive therapy may improve depressive symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. - Digestive diseases and sciences
Recent research suggests a relationship of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and depression. Our objective was to evaluate for improvement of depressive symptoms with treatment of IBD using immunosuppressive medications.A retrospective study of consecutive patients with IBD started on immunosuppressive agents [anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) or immunomodulator therapy] was conducted. Patients were evaluated if disease activity indices using Harvey Bradshaw Index for Crohn's disease (CD) and Simple Clinical Colitis Disease Activity Index for ulcerative colitis (UC) and depressive indices using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scores were obtained before and at least 30 days after initiation of therapy.Sixteen patients with UC and 53 patients with CD (all with active disease symptoms) were evaluated over a 60 day median follow-up evaluation (range 30, 140 days). Twenty-two patients started on immunomodulator therapy, and 47 patients started on anti-TNF therapy. Crohn's disease patients had significantly decreased PHQ-9 scores at follow-up [median 9 (range 3, 14) to 4 (1, 8)], with significant decreases only in those started on anti-TNF therapy. Changes in PHQ-9 and CRP were correlated (ρ = 0.38, p < 0.05). In patients with UC, PHQ-9 scores [5 (3, 9) to 2 (0, 5)] were significantly decreased. Percentage at risk of moderate to severe depression (PHQ-9 scores ≥10) was lower after treatment [Crohn's disease 51-18 % (p < 0.05), ulcerative colitis 18-0 %].Depressive scores decreased significantly in patients with IBD treated with immunosuppressive therapy and the number at risk for moderate to severe depression improved significantly.
Dynamic variation in forebrain estradiol levels during song learning. - Developmental neurobiology
Estrogens shape brain circuits during development, and the capacity to synthesize estrogens locally has consequences for both sexual differentiation and the acute modulation of circuits during early learning. A recently optimized method to detect and quantify fluctuations in brain estrogens in vivo provides a direct means to explore how brain estrogen production contributes to both differentiation and neuromodulation during development. Here, we use this method to test the hypothesis that neuroestrogens are sexually differentiated as well as dynamically responsive to song tutoring (via passive video/audio playback) during the period of song learning in juvenile zebra finches. Our results show that baseline neuroestradiol levels in the caudal forebrain do not differ between males and females during an early critical masculinization window. Instead, we observe a prominent difference between males and females in baseline neuroestradiol that emerges during the subadult stage as animals approach sexual maturity. Second, we observe that fluctuating neuroestradiol levels during periods of passive song tutoring exhibit a markedly different profile in juveniles as compared to adults. Specifically, neuroestrogens in the caudal forebrain are elevated following (rather than during) tutor song exposure in both juvenile males and females, suggesting an important role for the early consolidation of tutor song memories. These results further reveal a circadian influence on the fluctuations in local neuroestrogens during sensory/cognitive tasks. Taken together, these findings uncover several unexpected features of brain estrogen synthesis in juvenile animals that may have implications for secondary masculinization as well as the consolidation of recent sensory experiences.© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
The crimson care collaborative: a student-faculty initiative to increase medical students' early exposure to primary care. - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
The current shortage of primary care physicians (PCPs), particularly as more individuals obtain health insurance and seek primary care services, is a growing national concern. The Crimson Care Collaborative (CCC) is a joint student-faculty initiative in post-health-care-reform Massachusetts that was started with the explicit goal of attracting medical students to primary care careers. It fills a niche for student-run clinics, providing evening access to primary care services for patients without a PCP and urgent care services for patients of a Massachusetts General Hospital-affiliated internal medicine clinic, with the aim of decreasing emergency department use in both groups. Unlike other student-run clinics, CCC is integrated into the mainstream health care structure of an existing primary care clinic and, because of universal health insurance coverage in Massachusetts, can bill for its services. In addition to the clinical services offered, the student-run research team evaluates the quality of care and the patients' experiences at the clinic. This article describes the creation and development of CCC, including a brief overview of clinic operations, social services, research, laboratory services, student and patient education programs, and finance. In the wake of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, CCC is an example of how students can aid the transition to universal health care in the United States and how medical schools can expose students early in their training to primary care and clinic operations.
Combined liquid and solid-phase extraction improves quantification of brain estrogen content. - Frontiers in neuroanatomy
Accuracy in quantifying brain-derived steroid hormones ("neurosteroids") has become increasingly important for understanding the modulation of neuronal activity, development, and physiology. Relative to other neuroactive compounds and classical neurotransmitters, steroids pose particular challenges with regard to isolation and analysis, owing to their lipid solubility. Consequently, anatomical studies of the distribution of neurosteroids have relied primarily on the expression of neurosteroid synthesis enzymes. To evaluate the distribution of synthesis enzymes vis-à-vis the actual steroids themselves, traditional steroid quantification assays, including radioimmunoassays, have successfully employed liquid extraction methods (e.g., ether, dichloromethane, or methanol) to isolate steroids from microdissected brain tissue. Due to their sensitivity, safety, and reliability, the use of commercial enzyme-immunoassays (EIA) for laboratory quantification of steroids in plasma and brain has become increasingly widespread. However, EIAs rely on enzymatic reactions in vitro, making them sensitive to interfering substances in brain tissue and thus producing unreliable results. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of a protocol for combined, two-stage liquid/solid-phase extraction (SPE) as compared to conventional liquid extraction alone for the isolation of estradiol (E(2)) from brain tissue. We employ the songbird model system, in which brain steroid production is pronounced and linked to neural mechanisms of learning and plasticity. This study outlines a combined liquid-SPE protocol that improves the performance of a commercial EIA for the quantification of brain E(2) content. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our optimized method for evaluating the region specificity of brain E(2) content, compare these results to established anatomy of the estrogen synthesis enzyme and estrogen receptor, and discuss the nature of potential EIA interfering substances.

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16671 Yorba Linda Blvd Suite 100 Yorba Linda, CA 92886
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