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Dr. Danny  Wong  Md image

Dr. Danny Wong Md

4201 Garth Rd Ste 321
Baytown TX 77521
281 272-2747
Medical School: University Of Texas Medical Branch At Galveston - 1985
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: H0957
NPI: 1770510349
Taxonomy Codes:
207Y00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Danny Wong is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:31575 Description:Diagnostic laryngoscopy Average Price:$238.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$117.26
HCPCS Code:31231 Description:Nasal endoscopy dx Average Price:$302.27 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$197.41
HCPCS Code:99202 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$100.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$72.68
HCPCS Code:69210 Description:Remove impacted ear wax Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$51.46
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$65.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$42.64
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$80.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.64
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$110.80 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$105.35

HCPCS Code Definitions

99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99202
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 20 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
69210
Removal impacted cerumen requiring instrumentation, unilateral
31575
Laryngoscopy, flexible fiberoptic; diagnostic
31231
Nasal endoscopy, diagnostic, unilateral or bilateral (separate procedure)
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1770584690
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
222
1588653083
Diagnostic Radiology
151
1215032305
Critical Care (Intensivists)
74
1730102062
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
69
1598772915
Diagnostic Radiology
69
1609867126
Diagnostic Radiology
43
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Wong has made to other doctors

Publications

Kinetic model and thermodynamic study of Acid Red 1 entrapment at electropolymerised polypyrrole films. - Journal of colloid and interface science
This work is focussed on the determination of a kinetic model and the thermodynamic study of the electrochemical entrapment of the model azo dye, Acid Red 1, at conducting polypyrrole films, which is proposed as a potential green technology for treatment of azo dyes in industrial effluents. The entrapment kinetic data were found to follow a pseudosecond order model involving an intra-particle diffusion. However, the equilibrium data obtained for Acid Red 1 entrapment at polypyrrole did not obey any common surface adsorption models such as the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Accordingly, the entrapment process may lead to an enhanced quantity of dye embedded in a polypyrrole film, making it a more effective and efficient technology than those involving only adsorption. Similarly, dye leakage from polypyrrole film surface to a sample matrix will be easily prevented. For this treatment process, a negative ΔG(∘) range between -1.46±0.78 and -2.94±0.24kJmol(-1) at the corresponding temperature range of 298-318K, and a ΔH(∘) of 20.5±2.5kJmol(-1) indicate a spontaneous and endothermic entrapment process. Also, a positive ΔS(∘) (73.6±8.2Jmol(-1)K(-1)) reveals increased randomness of the interface and an affinity of Acid Red 1 towards polypyrrole films. A low activation energy (7.67±0.80kJmol(-1)) confirms a physical process for Acid Red 1 entrapment at polypyrrole films.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Anterior ethmoidal artery emerging anterior to bulla ethmoidalis: An abnormal anatomical variation in Waardenburg's syndrome. - Allergy & rhinology (Providence, R.I.)
In endoscopic sinus surgery, the anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is usually identified as it traverses obliquely across the fovea ethmoidalis, posterior to the bulla ethmoidalis and anterior to or within the ground lamella's attachment to the skull base. Injury to the AEA may result in hemorrhage, retraction of the AEA into the orbit, and a retrobulbar hematoma. The resulting increase in intraorbital pressure may threaten vision. Waardenburg's syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital, autosomal dominantly inherited disorder, distinguished by characteristic facial features, pigmentation abnormalities, and profound, congenital, sensorineural hearing loss. We present a case of AEAs located anterior to the bulla ethmoidalis in a 36-year-old male with WS and chronic rhinosinusitis. The anatomic abnormality was not obvious on a preoperative computed tomography scan and was discovered intraoperatively when the left AEA was injured, resulting in a retrobulbar hematoma. The hematoma was immediately identified and decompressed endoscopically without lasting complications. The AEA on the right was identified intraoperatively and preserved. The characteristic craniofacial features in WS were probably associated with the abnormal vascular anatomy. Endoscopic sinus surgeons should be aware of these potential anatomic anomalies in patients with abnormal craniofacial development.
Evaluation of a carbon nanotube-titanate nanotube nanocomposite as an electrochemical biosensor scaffold. - Biosensors & bioelectronics
A significant aspect of this work is the development of a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-titanate nanotube (TNT) nanocomposite to serve as a biocompatible scaffold with high conductivity on a biosensor surface. Unlike other scaffolds consisting of MWCNTs alone or TNTs alone, the MWCNT-TNT nanocomposite synergistically provides excellent biocompatibility, good electrical conductivity, low electrochemical interferences and a high signal-to-noise ratio. For comparison, after characterising a scaffold consisting of MWCNTs alone, TNTs alone and a MWCNT-TNT nanocomposite using several spectroscopic techniques, the analytical performance of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) electrochemical biosensor was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The scaffold consisting of MWCNTs alone displayed a high background charging current, a low signal-to-noise ratio and distinct electrochemical interference from its surface functional groups. In contrast, the direct electrochemistry and the catalytic capability of HRP at MWCNT-TNT modified biosensors towards H2O2 was demonstrated to be ~51% and ~144% enhanced, respectively, compared to those at TNT modified biosensors. Meanwhile, MWCNT-TNT nanocomposite modified HRP biosensors also exhibited higher sensitivity (4.42μAmM(-1)) than TNT modified HRP biosensors (1.48μAmM(-1)). The above superior performance was attributed to the improved properties of MWCNT-TNT nanocomposite as biosensor scaffold compared to its two individual components by complementing each component and synergistically sustaining the characteristic features of each component.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Hepatitis B reactivation in patients with previous hepatitis B virus exposure undergoing rituximab-containing chemotherapy for lymphoma: a prospective study. - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Patterns of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) -negative, antihepatitis B core antigen antibody (anti-HBc) -positive patients with lymphoma receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy have not been well described.HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc-positive Chinese patients with undetectable serum HBV DNA (< 10 IU/mL), diagnosed with hematologic malignancies and receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy, were prospectively monitored every 4 weeks for up to 2 years. Entecavir was started when HBV reactivation (defined as detectable HBV DNA) was encountered.Among 260 patients receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy, 63 patients (24.2%) who were HBsAg negative and anti-HBc positive underwent follow-up for a median of 70 weeks (range, 6 to 104 weeks). The 2-year cumulative rate of HBV reactivation was 41.5%, occurring at a median of 23 weeks (range, 4 to 100 weeks) after rituximab treatment. The median HBV DNA level at reactivation was 43 IU/mL (range, 14 to 920 IU/mL). A baseline undetectable antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs; < 10 mIU/mL) was the only significant risk factor that was positively associated with HBV reactivation (hazard ratio, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.37 to 8.98; P = .009). Patients with negative baseline anti-HBs, compared with those with positive anti-HBs, had a significantly higher 2-year cumulative rate of HBV reactivation (68.3% v 34.4%; P = .012). At HBV reactivation, all patients had normal ALT, and all patients but one were HBsAg negative. Entecavir successfully controlled HBV reactivation in all patients.A high rate of HBV reactivation was observed in HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc-positive patients undergoing rituximab-containing chemotherapy, with the risk of reactivation significantly higher in anti-HBs-negative patients. Periodic HBV DNA monitoring was an effective strategy in preventing HBV-related complications.© 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
Conducting polypyrrole films as a potential tool for electrochemical treatment of azo dyes in textile wastewaters. - Journal of hazardous materials
In this paper, we demonstrate conducting polypyrrole films as a potential green technology for electrochemical treatment of azo dyes in wastewaters using Acid Red 1 as a model analyte. These films were synthesised by anodically polymerising pyrrole in the presence of Acid Red 1 as a supporting electrolyte. In this way, the anionic Acid Red 1 is electrostatically attracted to the cationic polypyrrole backbone formed to maintain electroneutrality, and is thus entrapped in the film. These Acid Red 1-entrapped polypyrrole films were characterised by electrochemical, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Based on a two-level factorial design, the solution pH, Acid Red 1 concentration and polymerisation duration were identified as significant parameters affecting the entrapment efficiency. The entrapment process will potentially aid in decolourising Acid Red 1-containing wastewaters. Similarly, in a cathodic process, electrons are supplied to neutralise the polypyrrole backbone, liberating Acid Red 1 into a solution. In this work, following an entrapment duration of 480 min in 2000 mg L(-1) Acid Red 1, we estimated 21% of the dye was liberated after a reduction period of 240 min. This allows the recovery of Acid Red 1 for recycling purposes. A distinctive advantage of this electrochemical Acid Red 1 treatment, compared to many other techniques, is that no known toxic by-products are generated in the treatment. Therefore, conducting polypyrrole films can potentially be applied as an environmentally friendly treatment method for textile effluents.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Hepatitis B surface antigen seroclearance: Relationship to hepatitis B e-antigen seroclearance and hepatitis B e-antigen-negative hepatitis. - The American journal of gastroenterology
The objective of this study was to determine factors associated with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroclearance after hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg) seroclearance.This is a cohort study of HBeAg-positive patients with HBeAg seroclearance. Factors associated with subsequent HBsAg seroclearance were examined.A total of 775 patients were included. At 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years after HBeAg seroclearance, the HBsAg seroclearance rate was 0.3, 1.3, 3.0, 8.9, 15.7, and 23.6%, respectively. The rate of HBsAg seroclearance was highest in those who underwent spontaneous HBeAg seroclearance and required no treatment afterward (group 1), compared with those who underwent treatment-induced HBeAg seroclearance (group 2), and those who required antiviral therapy after spontaneous HBeAg seroclearance (group 3). At 25 years after HBeAg seroclearance, the HBsAg seroclearance rate was 38.0, 14.9, and 0% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<0.001). There was no difference in the rate of HBsAg seroclearance between those who received interferon-based therapy compared with nucleos(t)ide analogs. The median HBV DNA level was similar between those with and without HBsAg seroclearance. The median HBsAg level was significantly lower in those who had HBsAg seroclearance compared with those who did not achieve loss of HBsAg (2.81 vs. 3.52 log IU/ml, respectively, P=0.009). The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for HBsAg at 1 year after HBeAg seroclearance for predicting HBsAg seroclearance was 0.742, with an optimal cutoff of 751 IU/ml.Spontaneous HBeAg seroclearance without need for subsequent antiviral therapy was associated with the highest rate of subsequent HBsAg seroclearance. Lower HBsAg levels were also associated with higher chance of HBsAg seroclearance.
Application of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR sequencing for early detection of antiviral drug resistance mutations of hepatitis B virus. - Journal of clinical microbiology
Nucleoside/nucleotide analogue for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is hampered by the emergence of drug resistance mutations. Conventional PCR sequencing cannot detect minor variants of <20%. We developed a modified co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR (COLD-PCR) method for the detection of HBV minority drug resistance mutations. The critical denaturation temperature for COLD-PCR was determined to be 78°C. Sensitivity of COLD-PCR sequencing was determined using serially diluted plasmids containing mixed proportions of HBV reverse transcriptase (rt) wild-type and mutant sequences. Conventional PCR sequencing detected mutations only if they existed in ≥25%, whereas COLD-PCR sequencing detected mutations when they existed in 5 to 10% of the viral population. The performance of COLD-PCR was compared to conventional PCR sequencing and a line probe assay (LiPA) using 215 samples obtained from 136 lamivudine- or telbivudine-treated patients with virological breakthrough. Among these 215 samples, drug resistance mutations were detected in 155 (72%), 148 (69%), and 113 samples (53%) by LiPA, COLD-PCR, and conventional PCR sequencing, respectively. Nineteen (9%) samples had mutations detectable by COLD-PCR but not LiPA, while 26 (12%) samples had mutations detectable by LiPA but not COLD-PCR, indicating both methods were comparable (P = 0.371). COLD-PCR was more sensitive than conventional PCR sequencing. Thirty-five (16%) samples had mutations detectable by COLD-PCR but not conventional PCR sequencing, while none had mutations detected by conventional PCR sequencing but not COLD-PCR (P < 0.0001). COLD-PCR sequencing is a simple method which is comparable to LiPA and superior to conventional PCR sequencing in detecting minor lamivudine/telbivudine resistance mutations.Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Artificial neural network accurately predicts hepatitis B surface antigen seroclearance. - PloS one
Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroclearance and seroconversion are regarded as favorable outcomes of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). This study aimed to develop artificial neural networks (ANNs) that could accurately predict HBsAg seroclearance or seroconversion on the basis of available serum variables.Data from 203 untreated, HBeAg-negative CHB patients with spontaneous HBsAg seroclearance (63 with HBsAg seroconversion), and 203 age- and sex-matched HBeAg-negative controls were analyzed. ANNs and logistic regression models (LRMs) were built and tested according to HBsAg seroclearance and seroconversion. Predictive accuracy was assessed with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC).Serum quantitative HBsAg (qHBsAg) and HBV DNA levels, qHBsAg and HBV DNA reduction were related to HBsAg seroclearance (P<0.001) and were used for ANN/LRM-HBsAg seroclearance building, whereas, qHBsAg reduction was not associated with ANN-HBsAg seroconversion (P = 0.197) and LRM-HBsAg seroconversion was solely based on qHBsAg (P = 0.01). For HBsAg seroclearance, AUROCs of ANN were 0.96, 0.93 and 0.95 for the training, testing and genotype B subgroups respectively. They were significantly higher than those of LRM, qHBsAg and HBV DNA (all P<0.05). Although the performance of ANN-HBsAg seroconversion (AUROC 0.757) was inferior to that for HBsAg seroclearance, it tended to be better than those of LRM, qHBsAg and HBV DNA.ANN identifies spontaneous HBsAg seroclearance in HBeAg-negative CHB patients with better accuracy, on the basis of easily available serum data. More useful predictors for HBsAg seroconversion are still needed to be explored in the future.
Sequence variations of full-length hepatitis B virus genomes in Chinese patients with HBsAg-negative hepatitis B infection. - PloS one
The underlying mechanism of HBsAg-negative hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is notoriously difficult to elucidate because of the extremely low DNA levels which define the condition. We used a highly efficient amplification method to overcome this obstacle and achieved our aim which was to identify specific mutations or sequence variations associated with this entity.A total of 185 sera and 60 liver biopsies from HBsAg-negative, HBV DNA-positive subjects or known chronic hepatitis B (CHB) subjects with HBsAg seroclearance were amplified by rolling circle amplification followed by full-length HBV genome sequencing. Eleven HBsAg-positive CHB subjects were included as controls. The effects of pivotal mutations identified on regulatory regions on promoter activities were analyzed.22 and 11 full-length HBV genomes were amplified from HBsAg-negative and control subjects respectively. HBV genotype C was the dominant strain. A higher mutation frequency was observed in HBsAg-negative subjects than controls, irrespective of genotype. The nucleotide diversity over the entire HBV genome was significantly higher in HBsAg-negative subjects compared with controls (p = 0.008) and compared with 49 reference sequences from CHB patients (p = 0.025). In addition, HBsAg-negative subjects had significantly higher amino acid substitutions in the four viral genes than controls (all p<0.001). Many mutations were uniquely found in HBsAg-negative subjects, including deletions in promoter regions (13.6%), abolishment of pre-S2/S start codon (18.2%), disruption of pre-S2/S mRNA splicing site (4.5%), nucleotide duplications (9.1%), and missense mutations in "α" determinant region, contributing to defects in HBsAg production.These data suggest an accumulation of multiple mutations constraining viral transcriptional activities contribute to HBsAg-negativity in HBV infection.
Hepatitis B surface antigen levels after hepatitis B e-antigen seroclearance: a longitudinal follow-up study. - Liver international : official journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver
The role of quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) after hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg) seroclearance is not well defined. To determine the role of HBsAg levels in predicting significant viremia and hepatitis flares after HBeAg seroclearance.A total of 228 chronic hepatitis B patients with spontaneous HBeAg seroclearance were included. Patients were followed up regularly at 3-6 monthly intervals with routine liver biochemistry and hepatitis B serology. Levels of HBV DNA and HBsAg were measured at yearly intervals for up to 5 years after HBeAg seroclearance.The median log HBsAg and HBV DNA level after HBeAg seroclearance was 3.52 IU/ml and 4.13 IU/ ml respectively, with no significant correlation observed between them (P = 0.572). The HBV DNA at HBeAg seroclearance was 4.13 log IU/ml, compared with 3.12 log IU/ml after 5 years (P < 0.001). No significant change was observed for HBsAg levels (P = 0.991). Hepatitis B flares occurred in 76 (33.3%) patients. Patients who developed hepatitic flares compared with those without hepatitic flares were older (40 vs. 36 years, P = 0.001), had a higher HBV DNA at the time of HBeAg seroclearance (4.70 vs. 3.77 log IU/ml, P =< 0.001), and more likely to be males (42.7% vs. 23.4%, P = 0.002) respectively. There was no difference in HBsAg levels between those with and without hepatitis flare (3.54 vs. 3.52 log IU/ml respectively, P = 0.555).HBV DNA levels, but not HBsAg levels, after HBeAg seroclearance were associated with subsequent significant viremia and hepatitic flares. Male gender and older age was associated with significant viremia.© 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Map & Directions

4201 Garth Rd Ste 321 Baytown, TX 77521
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