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Dr. Karen  Quillen  Md image

Dr. Karen Quillen Md

670 Albany St 3Rd Floor Room 310
Boston MA 02118
617 145-5314
Medical School: Other - 1991
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 154579
NPI: 1750354130
Taxonomy Codes:
207RH0000X 207ZB0001X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$393.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$198.37
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$308.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$135.20
HCPCS Code:86077 Description:Physician blood bank service Average Price:$133.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$49.82
HCPCS Code:86078 Description:Physician blood bank service Average Price:$133.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$50.21
HCPCS Code:88104 Description:Cytopath fl nongyn smears Average Price:$77.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.59
HCPCS Code:86334 Description:Immunofix e-phoresis serum Average Price:$54.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.83
HCPCS Code:84166 Description:Protein e-phoresis/urine/csf Average Price:$52.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.83
HCPCS Code:86335 Description:Immunfix e-phorsis/urine/csf Average Price:$52.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.83
HCPCS Code:84165 Description:Protein e-phoresis serum Average Price:$39.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.83
HCPCS Code:89060 Description:Exam synovial fluid crystals Average Price:$26.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.83

HCPCS Code Definitions

86077
Blood bank physician services; difficult cross match and/or evaluation of irregular antibody(s), interpretation and written report
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
84165
Protein; electrophoretic fractionation and quantitation, serum
84166
Protein; electrophoretic fractionation and quantitation, other fluids with concentration (eg, urine, CSF)
86334
Immunofixation electrophoresis; serum
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
89060
Crystal identification by light microscopy with or without polarizing lens analysis, tissue or any body fluid (except urine)
88104
Cytopathology, fluids, washings or brushings, except cervical or vaginal; smears with interpretation
86335
Immunofixation electrophoresis; other fluids with concentration (eg, urine, CSF)
86078
Blood bank physician services; investigation of transfusion reaction including suspicion of transmissible disease, interpretation and written report

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1659345320
Hematology/Oncology
829
1003886573
Hematology/Oncology
313
1073541256
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
303
1457322588
Hematology/Oncology
290
1063460087
Hematology/Oncology
226
1023093994
Geriatric Medicine
194
1518938745
Diagnostic Radiology
179
1720065477
Cardiac Electrophysiology
155
1780669671
Pulmonary Disease
153
1831166370
Diagnostic Radiology
147
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Quillen has made to other doctors

Publications

Induction Therapy with Bortezomib Followed by Bortezomib-High Dose Melphalan and Stem Cell Transplantation for Light Chain Amyloidosis: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial. - Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
The depth of hematologic response has been shown to correlate with survival and organ responses for patients with light chain (AL) amyloidosis. We conducted a prospective trial of 2 cycles of induction with bortezomib and dexamethasone on a twice a week schedule followed by conditioning with bortezomib and high-dose melphalan (HDM) and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT). The objectives were hematologic responses, tolerability, and survival. Thirty-five patients were enrolled from 2010 to 2013. Of these, 30 proceeded with SCT, whereas 5 did not because of clinical deterioration during induction (n = 3) or complications after stem cell collection (n = 2). Two patients developed features of an autologous graft-versus-host disease-like syndrome post-SCT, which responded to steroids; no other unusual complications were seen. Treatment-related mortality occurred in 8.5% (3/35). Hematologic responses were achieved by 100% of the 27 assessable patients (63% complete response, 37% very good partial response [VGPR]) who completed the planned treatment. By intention-to-treat, hematologic responses occurred in 77% of patients (49% complete response, 29% VGPR). With a median follow-up of 36 months, the median overall survival and progression-free survival were not reached. In conclusion, incorporating bortezomib into induction and conditioning yielded a high rate of hematologic responses after HDM/SCT in patients with AL amyloidosis.Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Plerixafor-augmented peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in AL amyloidosis with cardiac involvement: a case series. - Amyloid : the international journal of experimental and clinical investigation : the official journal of the International Society of Amyloidosis
Nearly half of AL amyloidosis patients have cardiac involvement, an independent predictor of poor prognosis. High-dose melphalan and autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDM/SCT) can induce complete hematologic responses and prolong survival in AL amyloidosis. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-induced mobilization of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) in AL amyloidosis patients is associated with volume overload, arrhythmias and capillary leak syndrome. Plerixafor has a different mechanism of action and has non-overlapping toxicities with G-CSF. We describe our experience in five patients with AL amyloidosis and cardiac involvement who received plerixafor with G-CSF for PBSC mobilization. Median age was 56 years; two patients had undergone heart transplantation within the year prior to HDM/SCT. Three patients received plerixafor after an initial trial of mobilization with G-CSF alone. No patient had any significant toxicities during mobilization and PBSC collection. The median total yield of PBSCs collected was 5.9 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg; the median number of leukapheresis days was 2. Neutrophil engraftment after HDM/SCT occurred at a median of nine days, platelet engraftment at a median of 13 days. Plerixafor was effective and well tolerated when used upfront or as rescue for PBSC mobilization in AL amyloidosis patients with cardiac involvement.
Plasma exchange and glucocorticoid dosing in the treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis (PEXIVAS): protocol for a randomized controlled trial. - Trials
Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener's) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) are small vessel vasculitides collectively referred to as anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV). AAV is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality due to uncontrolled disease and treatment toxicity. Small randomized trials suggest adjunctive plasma exchange may improve disease control, while observational evidence suggests that current oral glucocorticoid doses are associated with severe infections in patients with AAV. A randomized study of both plasma exchange and glucocorticoids is required to evaluate plasma exchange and oral glucocorticoid dosing in patients with AAV.PEXIVAS is a two-by-two factorial randomized trial evaluating adjunctive plasma exchange and two oral glucocorticoid regimens in severe AAV. Five hundred patients are being randomized at centers across Europe, North America, Asia, and Australasia to receive plasma exchange or no plasma exchange, and to receive standard or reduced oral glucocorticoid dosing. All patients receive immunosuppression with either cyclophosphamide or rituximab. The primary outcome is the time to the composite of all-cause mortality and end-stage renal disease.PEXIVAS is funded by the National Institute of Health Research (UK), the Food and Drug Administration (USA), the National Institutes of Health (USA), the Canadian Institute of Health Research (Canada), the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia), and Assistance Publique (France). Additional in-kind supplies for plasma exchange are provided by industry partners (TerumoBCT, Gambro Australia, and Fresenius Australia).This is the largest trial in AAV undertaken to date. PEXIVAS will inform the future standard of care for patients with severe AAV. The cooperation between investigators, funding agencies, and industry provides a model for conducting studies in rare diseases.Current Controlled Trials: (ISRCTN07757494) and clinicaltrials.gov: (NCT00987389).
Successful long-term management of aneurysm-associated chronic disseminated intravascular coagulation with low molecular weight heparin. - Journal of cardiac surgery
Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a well-described complication of aortic aneurysm. In cases where surgical repair of the aneurysm is contraindicated, palliative therapy via medical management of the coagulopathy may be warranted. We present a case of aneurysm-associated DIC successfully managed with low molecular weight heparin.© 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Amyloid deposits in the bone marrow of patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis do not impact stem cell mobilization or engraftment. - Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Amyloid deposits are often found in the bone marrow in patients with Immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis. We sought to determine whether this affects stem cell collection or engraftment after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDM-SCT). We reviewed data on 361 patients with AL amyloidosis who had Congo red staining of pretreatment bone marrow biopsy specimens and underwent HDM-SCT between July 1994 and December 2011. We analyzed data on stem cell yield, days of stem cell collection, and days to neutrophil and platelet engraftment posttransplantation. Bone marrow amyloid deposits were found in 65% of patients (n = 233). There were no significant differences in median number of stem cells collected and days to neutrophil or platelet engraftment between patients with bone marrow amyloid deposits and those without these deposits. Thus, our data indicate that although amyloid involvement of the bone marrow is common, it does not negatively affect stem cell mobilization or neutrophil and platelet engraftment after HDM-SCT.Copyright © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
A massive transfusion protocol incorporating a higher FFP/RBC ratio is associated with decreased use of recombinant activated factor VII in trauma patients. - American journal of clinical pathology
We implemented a protocol incorporating a higher fresh frozen plasma (FFP)/RBC ratio for the management of trauma patients requiring massive transfusion in 2007. This study aims to identify issues that affected the effective deployment of the massive transfusion protocol (MTP) and compare outcome variables with a historic cohort. Data from 49 trauma patients who received at least 10 units of packed RBCs within 24 hours were analyzed and compared with a historic massively transfused cohort who had received recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa). Of the patients, 28 received an FFP/RBC ratio of 1:1 to 1:2; 12 received a lower ratio of 1:2 to 1:4; 3 received more than 1:1 and 6 had less than 1:4. Compared with the historic cohort, the 1:1-1:2 group received significantly fewer blood components and did not require rescue rFVIIa. An MTP incorporating a higher FFP/RBC ratio of 1:1 to 1:2 is associated with decreased use of blood components and may obviate the need for rFVII.
Outcome of AL amyloidosis after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation: long-term results in a series of 421 patients. - Blood
Previous studies have suggested that, in patients with AL amyloidosis treated with high-dose melphalan and autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDM/SCT), the greatest benefit is seen in those patients achieving a hematologic complete response (CR). We analyzed a series of 421 consecutive patients treated with HDM/SCT at a single referral center and compared outcomes for patients with and without CR. Treatment-related mortality was 11.4% overall (5.6% in the last 5 years). By intention-to-treat analysis, the CR rate was 34% and the median event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 2.6 and 6.3 years, respectively. Eighty-one patients died within the first year after HDM/SCT and were not evaluable for hematologic and organ response. Of 340 evaluable patients, 43% achieved CR and 78% of them experienced an organ response. For CR patients, median EFS and OS were 8.3 and 13.2 years, respectively. Among the 195 patients who did not obtain CR, 52% achieved an organ response, and their median EFS and OS were 2 and 5.9 years, respectively. Thus, treatment of selected AL patients with HDM/SCT resulted in a high organ response rate and long OS, even for those patients who did not achieve CR.
Screening plateletpheresis donors for HLA antibodies on two high-throughput platforms and correlation with recipient outcome. - Transfusion
To determine the prevalence and impact of transfusing plasma containing white blood cell antibodies, we compared two high-throughput HLA antibody screening assays and prospectively examined the medical records of all platelet (PLT) recipients to detect subtle manifestations of transfusion-related acute lung injury and other transfusion reactions.Serum samples from 136 plateletpheresis donors were tested for HLA Class I and II antibodies using microbead (LABScreen PRA, One Lambda) and microchip (Dynachip, Invitrogen) assays. Electronic medical records of all recipients were reviewed for vital signs and nursing documentation before and after transfusion.In the microchip assay with a cutoff value of 0.25, 2.9% of samples were positive for Class I and 8.9% for Class II antibodies; with a cutoff value of 0.1, the results were 14.9 and 21.6%, respectively. In the microbead assay (normalized background ratio, 1.5), 15% were positive for Class I and 21% for Class II antibodies. The prevalence of HLA antibodies was 17% in donors without pregnancy or transfusion history and 47% in donors with such history. The PLTs were transfused in 265 episodes to 67 patients. There were no reported reactions; however, symptoms or vital sign changes were noted in seven transfusion episodes. The incidence of reactions was 2.7% (2/75) for antibody-positive units and 2.6% (5/190) for antibody-negative units.Microbead and microchip assays yielded similar results. The prevalence of HLA antibodies was greater in donors with a history of pregnancy or transfusion, but no increase in the incidence of transfusion reactions was noted in recipients of components from donors with HLA antibodies.© 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.
Prevalence of RhD variants, confirmed by molecular genotyping, in a multiethnic prenatal population. - American journal of clinical pathology
RhD determination in pregnant women is critical to facilitate Rh immune globulin prophylaxis for RhD-negative women. A single amino acid change in the RhD antigen can cause epitope loss, giving rise to "partial D" variants. Women with some partial D variants may develop anti-D against the missing epitope after pregnancy. RBCs with partial D may type as D-positive or D-negative depending on the reagent used. We screened routine blood bank samples from 501 prenatal patients for RhD variants by 3 commercially available serologic methods. Discordant serologic results were found in 11 cases. Weak D (n = 5) and partial D (n = 5) variants were confirmed by molecular genotyping in all but 1 case. RhD variants, confirmed molecularly, occur in 2.2% of our multiethnic population. Consideration of patients' ethnic background and close cooperation between pathologists and obstetric providers facilitate optimal prenatal care in these cases.
A practical strategy to reduce the risk of passive hemolysis by screening plateletpheresis donors for high-titer ABO antibodies. - Transfusion
Hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) can occur from ABO-incompatible platelet (PLT) transfusions. After a series of cases at our institution, a procedure to screen all plateletpheresis donors for high-titer ABO antibodies was implemented.Plasma samples from plateletpheresis donors were screened using pooled 0.8% A1 and 0.8% B red blood cells (RBCs) in buffered gel. Dilutions of 1 in 150, 1 in 200, and 1 in 250 were sequentially evaluated. A component testing positive for high-titer ABO antibodies was restricted to ABO-identical or group O recipients or washed.At the initial dilution of 1 in 150, half of group O components were labeled as high titer. At the current dilution of 1 in 250, 25% of group O components are labeled as high titer. No PLT-associated HTR has been reported since screening began.Universal screening for high-titer ABO antibodies in plateletpheresis donors can be implemented efficiently to reduce the risk of HTRs. The cutoff for classifying a unit as high titer depends on the serologic method used and may be customized by the individual facility. Our screening method uses one gel test per donation regardless of blood group and a plasma dilution of 1 in 250 with pooled A1/B RBCs in buffered gel.© 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

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670 Albany St 3Rd Floor Room 310 Boston, MA 02118
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