Docality.com Logo
 
Dr. Robert  Conley  Do image

Dr. Robert Conley Do

100 Fairfield Dr
Seneca PA 16346
814 767-7113
Medical School: Lake Erie College Of Osteopathic Medicine - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1730195843
Taxonomy Codes:
207ZC0500X

Request Appointment Information

Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Robert Conley is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:88112 Description:Cytopath cell enhance tech Average Price:$387.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$55.06
HCPCS Code:88307 Description:Tissue exam by pathologist Average Price:$313.58 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$77.09
HCPCS Code:88173 Description:Cytopath eval fna report Average Price:$263.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.24
HCPCS Code:88331 Description:Path consult intraop 1 bloc Average Price:$232.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$57.36
HCPCS Code:88342 Description:Immunohistochemistry Average Price:$161.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.02
HCPCS Code:88305 Description:Tissue exam by pathologist Average Price:$142.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$35.23
HCPCS Code:88141 Description:Cytopath c/v interpret Average Price:$119.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.18
HCPCS Code:P3001 Description:Screening pap smear by phys Average Price:$119.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.18
HCPCS Code:88172 Description:Cytp dx eval fna 1st ea site Average Price:$114.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$32.88
HCPCS Code:88312 Description:Special stains group 1 Average Price:$101.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.29
HCPCS Code:88177 Description:Cytp fna eval ea addl Average Price:$91.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.27
HCPCS Code:88311 Description:Decalcify tissue Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.66
HCPCS Code:88304 Description:Tissue exam by pathologist Average Price:$42.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.67
HCPCS Code:88302 Description:Tissue exam by pathologist Average Price:$26.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$6.36
HCPCS Code:88300 Description:Surgical path gross Average Price:$16.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.35

HCPCS Code Definitions

88177
Cytopathology, evaluation of fine needle aspirate; immediate cytohistologic study to determine adequacy for diagnosis, each separate additional evaluation episode, same site (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
88173
Cytopathology, evaluation of fine needle aspirate; interpretation and report
88172
Cytopathology, evaluation of fine needle aspirate; immediate cytohistologic study to determine adequacy for diagnosis, first evaluation episode, each site
88141
Cytopathology, cervical or vaginal (any reporting system), requiring interpretation by physician
88112
Cytopathology, selective cellular enhancement technique with interpretation (eg, liquid based slide preparation method), except cervical or vaginal
88300
Level I - Surgical pathology, gross examination only
88312
Special stain including interpretation and report; Group I for microorganisms (eg, acid fast, methenamine silver)
88331
Pathology consultation during surgery; first tissue block, with frozen section(s), single specimen
88302
Level II - Surgical pathology, gross and microscopic examination Appendix, incidental Fallopian tube, sterilization Fingers/toes, amputation, traumatic Foreskin, newborn Hernia sac, any location Hydrocele sac Nerve Skin, plastic repair Sympathetic ganglion Testis, castration Vaginal mucosa, incidental Vas deferens, sterilization
88304
Level III - Surgical pathology, gross and microscopic examination Abortion, induced Abscess Aneurysm - arterial/ventricular Anus, tag Appendix, other than incidental Artery, atheromatous plaque Bartholin's gland cyst Bone fragment(s), other than pathologic fracture Bursa/synovial cyst Carpal tunnel tissue Cartilage, shavings Cholesteatoma Colon, colostomy stoma Conjunctiva - biopsy/pterygium Cornea Diverticulum - esophagus/small intestine Dupuytren's contracture tissue Femoral head, other than fracture Fissure/fistula Foreskin, other than newborn Gallbladder Ganglion cyst Hematoma Hemorrhoids Hydatid of Morgagni Intervertebral disc Joint, loose body Meniscus Mucocele, salivary Neuroma - Morton's/traumatic Pilonidal cyst/sinus Polyps, inflammatory - nasal/sinusoidal Skin - cyst/tag/debridement Soft tissue, debridement Soft tissue, lipoma Spermatocele Tendon/tendon sheath Testicular appendage Thrombus or embolus Tonsil and/or adenoids Varicocele Vas deferens, other than sterilization Vein, varicosity
88311
Decalcification procedure (List separately in addition to code for surgical pathology examination)
88307
Level V - Surgical pathology, gross and microscopic examination Adrenal, resection Bone - biopsy/curettings Bone fragment(s), pathologic fracture Brain, biopsy Brain/meninges, tumor resection Breast, excision of lesion, requiring microscopic evaluation of surgical margins Breast, mastectomy - partial/simple Cervix, conization Colon, segmental resection, other than for tumor Extremity, amputation, non-traumatic Eye, enucleation Kidney, partial/total nephrectomy Larynx, partial/total resection Liver, biopsy - needle/wedge Liver, partial resection Lung, wedge biopsy Lymph nodes, regional resection Mediastinum, mass Myocardium, biopsy Odontogenic tumor Ovary with or without tube, neoplastic Pancreas, biopsy Placenta, third trimester Prostate, except radical resection Salivary gland Sentinel lymph node Small intestine, resection, other than for tumor Soft tissue mass (except lipoma) - biopsy/simple excision Stomach - subtotal/total resection, other than for tumor Testis, biopsy Thymus, tumor Thyroid, total/lobe Ureter, resection Urinary bladder, TUR Uterus, with or without tubes and ovaries, other than neoplastic/prolapse
88305
Level IV - Surgical pathology, gross and microscopic examination Abortion - spontaneous/missed Artery, biopsy Bone marrow, biopsy Bone exostosis Brain/meninges, other than for tumor resection Breast, biopsy, not requiring microscopic evaluation of surgical margins Breast, reduction mammoplasty Bronchus, biopsy Cell block, any source Cervix, biopsy Colon, biopsy Duodenum, biopsy Endocervix, curettings/biopsy Endometrium, curettings/biopsy Esophagus, biopsy Extremity, amputation, traumatic Fallopian tube, biopsy Fallopian tube, ectopic pregnancy Femoral head, fracture Fingers/toes, amputation, non-traumatic Gingiva/oral mucosa, biopsy Heart valve Joint, resection Kidney, biopsy Larynx, biopsy Leiomyoma(s), uterine myomectomy - without uterus Lip, biopsy/wedge resection Lung, transbronchial biopsy Lymph node, biopsy Muscle, biopsy Nasal mucosa, biopsy Nasopharynx/oropharynx, biopsy Nerve, biopsy Odontogenic/dental cyst Omentum, biopsy Ovary with or without tube, non-neoplastic Ovary, biopsy/wedge resection Parathyroid gland Peritoneum, biopsy Pituitary tumor Placenta, other than third trimester Pleura/pericardium - biopsy/tissue Polyp, cervical/endometrial Polyp, colorectal Polyp, stomach/small intestine Prostate, needle biopsy Prostate, TUR Salivary gland, biopsy Sinus, paranasal biopsy Skin, other than cyst/tag/debridement/plastic repair Small intestine, biopsy Soft tissue, other than tumor/mass/lipoma/debridement Spleen Stomach, biopsy Synovium Testis, other than tumor/biopsy/castration Thyroglossal duct/brachial cleft cyst Tongue, biopsy Tonsil, biopsy Trachea, biopsy Ureter, biopsy Urethra, biopsy Urinary bladder, biopsy Uterus, with or without tubes and ovaries, for prolapse Vagina, biopsy Vulva/labia, biopsy
P3001
Screening papanicolaou smear, cervical or vaginal, up to three smears, requiring interpretation by physician
88342
Immunohistochemistry or immunocytochemistry, each separately identifiable antibody per block, cytologic preparation, or hematologic smear; first separately identifiable antibody per slide

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1942275839
Internal Medicine
1,232
1962499178
Diagnostic Radiology
1,035
1891767893
Internal Medicine
764
1386780765
Urology
657
1578564613
Radiation Oncology
627
1255313938
Internal Medicine
577
1538180278
Family Practice
543
1114990629
Internal Medicine
511
1184649600
Medical Oncology
472
1235132630
Internal Medicine
435
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Conley has made to other doctors

Publications

Pharmacogenomic associations with weight gain in olanzapine treatment of patients without schizophrenia. - The Journal of clinical psychiatry
Pharmacogenomic analyses of weight gain during treatment with second-generation antipsychotics have resulted in a number of associations with variants in ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1)/dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and serotonin 2C receptor (HTR2C) genes. These studies primarily assessed subjects with schizophrenia who had prior antipsychotic exposure that may have influenced the amount of weight gained from subsequent therapies. We assessed the relationships between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes with weight gain during treatment with olanzapine in a predominantly antipsychotic-naive population.The association between 5 ANKK1, 54 DRD2, and 11 HTR2C SNPs and weight change during 8 weeks of olanzapine treatment was assessed in 4 pooled studies of 205 white patients with diagnoses other than schizophrenia who were generally likely to have had limited previous antipsychotic exposure.The A allele of DRD2 rs2440390(A/G) was associated with greater weight gain in the entire study sample (P = .0473). Three HTR2C SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium, rs6318, rs2497538, and rs1414334, were associated with greater weight gain in women but not in men (P = .0032, .0012, and .0031, respectively). A significant association with weight gain for 2 HTR2C SNPs previously reported associated with weight gain, -759C/T (rs3813929) and -697G/C (rs518147), was not found.Associations between weight gain and HTR2C and DRD2 variants in whites newly exposed to olanzapine may present opportunities for the individualization of medication selection and development based on differences in adverse events observed across genotype groups.© Copyright 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
Antipsychotic monotherapy among outpatients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine or risperidone in Japan: a health care database analysis. - Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment
Antipsychotic monotherapy is often recommended over antipsychotic polypharmacy because of fewer adverse events, reduced treatment complexity, and lower medication cost. This study compared the rate and the duration of antipsychotic monotherapy following initiation of olanzapine or risperidone in the treatment of outpatients with schizophrenia in Japan.Outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia in the Japan Medical Data Center database were identified using International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, diagnosis codes. Patients were between 20 and 65 years old, initiated on olanzapine or risperidone therapy between August 2003 and July 2008, and continuously enrolled during the 6 months prior to and the 12 months following the initiation date. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was defined as concurrent use of two or more antipsychotics. The probability of monotherapy during the 12-month follow-up period was assessed using a propensity score-adjusted generalized estimating equation model. Duration of monotherapy was contrasted using a propensity score-adjusted bootstrapping model.After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria, the final analytic sample consisted of 332 olanzapine- and 496 risperidone-treated outpatients. At treatment initiation, 61.5% of the olanzapine-treated patients and 45.6% of the risperidone-treated patients received antipsychotic monotherapy (P < 0.001). After correcting for background differences, monotherapy was more common among olanzapine-treated patients (P = 0.001). In addition, olanzapine was used as monotherapy for a longer duration (P = 0.006).Consistent with prior global research, this retrospective naturalistic study of schizophrenia outpatients in Japan found that olanzapine is more likely to be used as monotherapy and to be used as monotherapy for a longer duration than risperidone.
Dopamine pathology in schizophrenia: analysis of total and phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase in the substantia nigra. - Frontiers in psychiatry
Despite the importance of dopamine neurotransmission in schizophrenia, very few studies have addressed anomalies in the mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA). Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for the production of dopamine, and a possible contributor to the anomalies in the dopaminergic neurotransmission observed in schizophrenia.In this study, we had three objectives: (1) Compare TH expression (mRNA and protein) in the SN/VTA of schizophrenia and control postmortem samples. (2) Assess the effect of antipsychotic medications on the expression of TH in the SN/VTA. (3) Examine possible regional differences in TH expression anomalies within the SN/VTA.To achieve these objectives three independent studies were conducted: (1) A pilot study to compare TH mRNA and TH protein levels in the SN/VTA of postmortem samples from schizophrenia and controls. (2) A chronic treatment study was performed in rodents to assess the effect of antipsychotic medications in TH protein levels in the SN/VTA. (3) A second postmortem study was performed to assess TH and phosphorylated TH protein levels in two types of samples: schizophrenia and control samples containing the entire rostro-caudal extent of the SN/VTA, and schizophrenia and control samples containing only mid-caudal regions of the SN/VTA.Our studies showed impairment in the dopaminergic system in schizophrenia that could be mainly (or exclusively) located in the rostral region of the SN/VTA. Our studies also showed that TH protein levels were significantly abnormal in schizophrenia, while mRNA expression levels were not affected, indicating that TH pathology in this region may occur posttranscriptionally. Lastly, our antipsychotic animal treatment study showed that TH protein levels were not significantly affected by antipsychotic treatment, indicating that these anomalies are an intrinsic pathology rather than a treatment effect.
Cost-effectiveness of several atypical antipsychotics in orally disintegrating tablets compared with standard oral tablets in the treatment of schizophrenia in the United States. - Journal of medical economics
Although the use of innovative drug delivery systems, like orally disintegrating antipsychotic tablets (ODT), may facilitate medication adherence and help reduce the risk of relapse and hospitalization, no information is available about the comparative cost-effectiveness of standard oral tablets (SOT) vs ODT formulations in the treatment of schizophrenia. This study compared the cost-effectiveness of olanzapine ODT and olanzapine SOT in the usual treatment of outpatients with schizophrenia from a US healthcare perspective. The study also compared olanzapine ODT with risperidone and aripiprazole, two other atypical antipsychotics available in both ODT and SOT formulations.Published medical literature and a clinical expert panel were used to populate a 1-year Monte Carlo Micro-simulation model. The model captures clinical and cost parameters including adherence levels, treatment discontinuation by reason, relapse with and without inpatient hospitalization, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), treatment-emergent adverse events, healthcare resource utilization, and associated costs. Key outcomes were total annual direct cost per treatment, QALY, and incremental cost-effectiveness (ICER) per 1 QALY gained.Based on model projections, olanzapine ODT therapy was more costly ($9808 vs $9533), but more effective in terms of a lower hospitalization rate (15% vs 16%) and better QALYs (0.747 vs 0.733) than olanzapine SOT therapy. Olanzapine ODT was more cost-effective than olanzapine SOT (ICER: $19,643), more cost-effective than risperidone SOT therapy (ICER: $39,966), and dominant (meaning less costly and more effective) than risperidone ODT and aripiprazole in ODT or SOT formulations.Lack of head-to-head randomized studies comparing the three studied atypical antipsychotics required making input assumptions that need further study.This micro-simulation found that the utilization of olanzapine ODT for the treatment of schizophrenia is predicted to be more cost-effective than any other ODT or SOT formulations of the studied atypical antipsychotic medications.
Rimonabant for neurocognition in schizophrenia: a 16-week double blind randomized placebo controlled trial. - Schizophrenia research
To examine the effect of rimonabant on neurocognitive impairments in people with schizophrenia.Participants entered a 16-week double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. A neurocognitive battery was administered at baseline and end of study.In comparison to rimonabant (20mg/day), placebo-treated participants exhibited a significant improvement on the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status total score. In contrast, rimonabant was associated with significant improvement on a probabilistic learning task. There were no other significant treatment effects.Rimonabant did not improve global cognitive functioning, but did improve a specific learning deficit based on response to positive feedback.Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Responses to antipsychotic therapy among patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and either predominant or prominent negative symptoms. - Schizophrenia research
Patients with schizophrenia who have predominant negative symptoms are often considered less responsive to treatment. This analysis of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder compares changes in symptom severity between those with predominant versus merely prominent negative symptoms. Prominent negative symptoms were defined by a baseline score of ≥4 on at least 3, or ≥5 on at least 2, of the 7 Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) negative subscale items. Predominant negative symptoms were defined by the foregoing plus a PANSS positive score of <19, a Barnes Akathisia score of <2, a Simpson-Angus score of <4, and a Calgary Depressive Scale score of <9. Adult patients with schizophrenia (n=227) or schizoaffective disorder (n=116) received either olanzapine (10-20mg/day, n=169) or quetiapine (300-700mg/day, n=174) for up to 24weeks. Data for both medications were pooled. Of the 343 patients enrolled in the study, 34.7% met the criteria for predominant negative symptoms, the remaining 65.3% being characterized only by their prominent negative symptoms. Changes in the severity of negative symptoms in both patient types largely followed similar trajectories during treatment, as reflected both in Marder PANSS negative subscale scores and in the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms total and domain scores. Patients with either predominant or prominent negative symptoms therefore appear to respond similarly to atypical antipsychotic treatment. This distinction, incorporating an evaluation of the presence of positive, affective, and extrapyramidal symptoms, may therefore not have prognostic implications for the responsiveness of patients' negative symptoms to treatment.Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Decline in hospitalization risk and health care cost after initiation of depot antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. - ClinicoEconomics and outcomes research : CEOR
To assess change in hospitalization and cost of care from 6 months pre- to 6 months post-initiation on any depot antipsychotic among schizophrenia patients.Using a large United States commercial claims and encounters database, patients younger than 65 years diagnosed with schizophrenia were identified. Patients initiated on a depot antipsychotic were studied in a mirror-image design to assess change in hospitalization rates, mean duration hospitalized, and hospitalization cost. McNemar's test and paired t-tests compared the proportions of patients hospitalized and the mean duration. Paired t-test and bootstrapping methods compared costs.In these patients (n = 147), psychiatric hospitalizations declined from 49.7% pre-initiation to 22.4% post-initiation (P < 0.001), and the mean hospitalized duration for psychiatric purposes numerically declined from 7.3 to 4.7 days (P = 0.05). Total health care costs declined from $11,111 to $7884 (P < 0.05) driven by reduction in costs for psychiatric hospitalizations from $5384 to $2538 (P < 0.05).Initiation of depot antipsychotic therapy appeared to be associated with a decline in hospitalization rates and costs. Current findings suggest that treatment with depot antipsychotics may be a cost-effective option for a subgroup of patients with schizophrenia who are at high risk of nonadherence with their oral antipsychotic medication regimen.
Proinflammatory cytokines in the prefrontal cortex of teenage suicide victims. - Journal of psychiatric research
Teenage suicide is a major public health concern, but its neurobiology is not well understood. Proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in stress and in the pathophysiology of depression-two major risk factors for suicide. Cytokines are increased in the serum of patients with depression and suicidal behavior; however, it is not clear if similar abnormality in cytokines occurs in brains of suicide victims. We therefore measured the gene and protein expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tissue necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of 24 teenage suicide victims and 24 matched normal control subjects. Our results show that the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were significantly increased in Brodmann area 10 (BA-10) of suicide victims compared with normal control subjects. These results suggest an important role for IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior and that proinflammatory cytokines may be an appropriate target for developing therapeutic agents.Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Striatal mitochondria in subjects with chronic undifferentiated vs. chronic paranoid schizophrenia. - Synapse (New York, N.Y.)
Schizophrenia (SZ) is a heterogeneous disease with a spectrum of symptoms, risk factors, and etiology. Abnormalities in mitochondria, the energy-producing organelles of the cell, have been observed in mixed cohorts of subjects with SZ. The purpose of the present study was to determine if striatal mitochondria were differentially affected in two different DSM-IV subgroups of SZ. Postmortem striatal tissue was examined from normal controls (NC), chronic paranoid SZs (SZP), and chronic undifferentiated SZs (SZU). Tissue was processed for calbindin immunohistochemistry to identify striosomal compartments, prepared for electron microscopy and analyzed using stereological methods. In both caudate and putamen, the density of mitochondria in the neuropil was decreased in SZP compared to both NCs and SZU. In the putamen, both the SZP and the SZU subgroups had fewer mitochondria per synapse than did NCs. When examining patch matrix compartments, striatal compartments associated with different circuitry and function, only the matrix exhibited changes. In the caudate matrix, the SZP subgroup had fewer mitochondria in the neuropil than did the SZU and NCs. In the putamen matrix, the SZP had fewer mitochondria in the neuropil as compared to NCs, but not the SZU. The numbers of mitochondria per synapse in both the SZP and the SZU groups were similar to each other and fewer than that of NCs. A decrease in mitochondrial density in the neuropil distinguishes the SZP from the SZU subgroup, which could be associated with the symptoms of paranoia and/or could represent a protective mechanism against some of the symptoms that are less pronounced in this subtype than in the SZU subgroup such as cognitive and emotional deficits.Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Analysis of gene variants previously associated with iloperidone response in patients with schizophrenia who are treated with risperidone. - The Journal of clinical psychiatry
We examined 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be associated with response to iloperidone therapy for association with response to risperidone therapy.Patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) were assessed during 2006 and 2007 for response/nonresponse (defined as ≥ 20%/<20% improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale [PANSS] total score) after 2 weeks of risperidone treatment (2 to 6 mg/d). Responders continued risperidone treatment; nonresponders were randomly assigned to either risperidone or olanzapine treatment (10 to 20 mg/d) for an additional 10 weeks. Associations between change in PANSS total (primary outcome measure), positive, and negative scores and the 6 SNPs were examined in risperidone-treated patients (N = 145). Genotype frequencies and improvement in PANSS total scores were analyzed for those SNPs significantly associated with change in PANSS total score.The SNPs XKR4 rs9643483 and GRIA4 rs2513265 were significantly associated with change in PANSS total response (adjusted P < .05 for both), with the same direction of effect as reported for iloperidone. For patients with nonresponsive genotypes for these SNPs, mean improvement in PANSS total score for African Americans was two-thirds that seen for whites (XKR4: -13.9 versus -21.4; GRIA4: -12.5 versus -20.9).In this retrospective pharmacogenomic analysis, we found that 2 SNPs previously linked to iloperidone response were also associated with response to risperidone.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00337662.© Copyright 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Map & Directions

100 Fairfield Dr Seneca, PA 16346
View Directions In Google Maps

Nearby Doctors

3178 State Route 257
Seneca, PA 16346
814 775-5162
2 Park Way
Seneca, PA 16346
814 776-6381
3605 State Route 257
Seneca, PA 16346
814 761-1849
3108 State Route 257
Seneca, PA 16346
814 777-7048
100 Fairfield Dr
Seneca, PA 16346
814 767-7992
3226 State Route 257
Seneca, PA 16346
814 762-2804
3742 State Route 257
Seneca, PA 16346
814 770-0041
3742 State Route 257
Seneca, PA 16346
814 783-3343
100 Fairfield Dr
Seneca, PA 16346
814 767-7600
100 Fairfield Dr
Seneca, PA 16346
814 767-7600