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Dr. Matthew  Will  Od image

Dr. Matthew Will Od

117 W Rush St
Kendallville IN 46755
260 473-3458
Medical School: Indiana University - School Of Optometry - 2004
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 18003274A
NPI: 1710982475
Taxonomy Codes:
152W00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Matthew Will is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:92134 Description:Cptr ophth dx img post segmt Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$42.36
HCPCS Code:92250 Description:Eye exam with photos Average Price:$72.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$63.78
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$44.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.11
HCPCS Code:92082 Description:Visual field examination(s) Average Price:$66.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$64.93
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$152.95 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$152.20
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$66.97 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.81
HCPCS Code:92014 Description:Eye exam & treatment Average Price:$96.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$96.00
HCPCS Code:92004 Description:Eye exam new patient Average Price:$126.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$126.00
HCPCS Code:66984 Description:Cataract surg w/iol 1 stage Average Price:$1.75 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1.75
HCPCS Code:92083 Description:Visual field examination(s) Average Price:$81.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$81.00
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$98.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$98.00
HCPCS Code:99335 Description:Domicil/r-home visit est pat Average Price:$69.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.00

HCPCS Code Definitions

92014
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation, with initiation or continuation of diagnostic and treatment program; comprehensive, established patient, 1 or more visits
92082
Visual field examination, unilateral or bilateral, with interpretation and report; intermediate examination (eg, at least 2 isopters on Goldmann perimeter, or semiquantitative, automated suprathreshold screening program, Humphrey suprathreshold automatic diagnostic test, Octopus program 33)
92004
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation with initiation of diagnostic and treatment program; comprehensive, new patient, 1 or more visits
66984
Extracapsular cataract removal with insertion of intraocular lens prosthesis (1 stage procedure), manual or mechanical technique (eg, irrigation and aspiration or phacoemulsification)
92083
Visual field examination, unilateral or bilateral, with interpretation and report; extended examination (eg, Goldmann visual fields with at least 3 isopters plotted and static determination within the central 30°, or quantitative, automated threshold perimetry, Octopus program G-1, 32 or 42, Humphrey visual field analyzer full threshold programs 30-2, 24-2, or 30/60-2)
92250
Fundus photography with interpretation and report
92134
Scanning computerized ophthalmic diagnostic imaging, posterior segment, with interpretation and report, unilateral or bilateral; retina
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99335
Domiciliary or rest home visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent with the patient and/or family or caregiver.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1205821659
Family Practice
636
1124013578
Internal Medicine
555
1427039593
Family Practice
398
1366423105
Family Practice
354
1376538819
Family Practice
352
1699760819
Family Practice
288
1285635334
Ophthalmology
270
1609850486
Internal Medicine
270
1023011004
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
224
1528060431
Hematology/Oncology
200
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Will has made to other doctors

Publications

Effects of co-administration of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and a selective µ-opioid receptor agonist into the nucleus accumbens on high-fat feeding behaviors in the rat. - Brain research
Previous research has demonstrated that the nucleus accumbens is a site where opioids and cannabinoids interact to alter feeding behavior. However, the influence of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) on the well-characterized model of intra-accumbens opioid driven high-fat feeding behavior has not been explored. The present experiments examined high-fat feeding associated behaviors produced by the interaction of 2-AG and the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAla(2),N,Me-Phe(4),Gly-ol(5)-enkaphalin (DAMGO) administered into the nucleus accumbens. Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bilateral cannulae aimed at the nucleus accumbens and were co-administered both a sub-threshold dose of 2-AG (0 or 0.25μg/0.5μl/side) and DAMGO (0, 0.025μg or 0.25μg/0.5μl/side) in all dose combinations, and in a counterbalanced order. Animals were then immediately allowed a 2h-unrestricted access period to a palatable high-fat diet. Consumption, number and duration of food hopper entries, and locomotor activity were all monitored. DAMGO treatment led to an increase in multiple behaviors, including consumption, duration of food hopper entry, and locomotor activity. However, combined intra-accumbens administration of DAMGO and a subthreshold dose of 2-AG led to a significant increase in number of food hopper entries and locomotor activity, compared to DAMGO by itself. The results confirm that intra-accumbens administration of subthreshold dose of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-AG increases the DAMGO-induced approach and locomotor behaviors associated with high-fat feeding.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Mu opioid receptor modulation in the nucleus accumbens lowers voluntary wheel running in rats bred for high running motivation. - Neuropharmacology
The exact role of opioid receptor signaling in mediating voluntary wheel running is unclear. To provide additional understanding, female rats selectively bred for motivation of low (LVR) versus high voluntary running (HVR) behaviors were used. Aims of this study were 1) to identify intrinsic differences in nucleus accumbens (NAc) mRNA expression of opioid-related transcripts and 2) to determine if nightly wheel running is differently influenced by bilateral NAc injections of either the mu-opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyo5-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25, 2.5 μg/side), or its antagonist, naltrexone (5, 10, 20 μg/side). In Experiment 1, intrinsic expression of Oprm1 and Pdyn mRNAs were higher in HVR compared to LVR. Thus, the data imply that line differences in opioidergic mRNA in the NAc could partially contribute to differences in wheel running behavior. In Experiment 2, a significant decrease in running distance was present in HVR rats treated with 2.5 μg DAMGO, or with 10 μg and 20 μg naltrexone between hours 0-1 of the dark cycle. Neither DAMGO nor naltrexone had a significant effect on running distance in LVR rats. Taken together, the data suggest that the high nightly voluntary running distance expressed by HVR rats is mediated by increased endogenous mu-opioid receptor signaling in the NAc, that is disturbed by either agonism or antagonism. In summary, our findings on NAc opioidergic mRNA expression and mu-opioid receptor modulations suggest HVR rats, compared to LVR rats, express higher running levels mediated by an increase in motivation driven, in part, by elevated NAc opioidergic signaling.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
A randomized crossover, pilot study examining the effects of a normal protein vs. high protein breakfast on food cravings and reward signals in overweight/obese "breakfast skipping", late-adolescent girls. - Nutrition journal
This pilot study examined whether the addition of a normal protein (NP) vs. high protein (HP) breakfast leads to alterations in food cravings and plasma homovanillic acid (HVA), which is an index of central dopamine production, in overweight/obese 'breakfast skipping' late-adolescent young women.A randomized crossover design was incorporated in which 20 girls (age 19 ± 1 y; BMI 28.6 ± 0.7 kg/m2) consumed 350 kcal NP (13 g protein) breakfast meals, 350 kcal HP (35 g protein) breakfast meals, or continued breakfast skipping (BS) for 6 consecutive days/pattern. On day 7 of each pattern, a 4 h testing day was completed including the consumption of breakfast (or no breakfast) followed by food craving questionnaires and blood sampling for HVA concentrations throughout the morning.Both breakfast meals reduced post-meal cravings for sweet and savory foods and increased HVA concentrations vs. BS (all, p < 0.05). Between breakfast meals, the HP breakfast tended to elicit greater reductions in post-meal savory cravings vs. NP (p = 0.08) and tended to elicit sustained increases in HVA concentrations prior to lunch vs. NP (p = 0.09). Lastly, HVA concentrations were positively correlated with the protein content at breakfast (r: 0.340; p < 0.03).Collectively, these findings suggest that the addition of breakfast reduces post-meal food cravings and increases homovanillic acid concentrations in overweight/obese young people with higher protein versions eliciting greater responses.
Beta-adrenergic antagonist effects on a novel cognitive flexibility task in rodents. - Behavioural brain research
Previous work examining animal models of cognitive flexibility have focused on tasks where animals are required to shift between cues in order to reach a food reward from among a limited set of choices. Performance by nonhuman animals on these tasks, including reversal learning, intradimensional set-shifting, and extradimensional set-shifting, are affected by pharmacological action on serotonergic, dopaminergic, and alpha-adrenergic, but not beta-adrenergic receptors. However, beta-adrenergic antagonists, such as propranolol, are widely utilized for conditions such as test anxiety. Propranolol improves performance in humans during cognitive flexibility tasks where there is a broad set of potential solutions. The current investigation utilized a digging task where the rodent must develop a novel solution in order to obtain a reward. Similar to the effects observed in humans, propranolol improved performance on this task, while not affecting performance on set-shifting tasks, as with previous animal studies. This may allow future investigation of the neurobiological mechanism by which propranolol affects context-specific anxiety, and could provide insight into the neurobiology of creativity.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Central amygdala opioid transmission is necessary for increased high-fat intake following 24-h food deprivation, but not following intra-accumbens opioid administration. - Behavioural brain research
Previous research has demonstrated a dissociation of certain neural mediators that contribute to the increased consumption of a high-fat diet that follows intra-accumbens (Acb) administration of μ-opioid receptor agonists vs. 24-h food deprivation. These two models, both which induce rapid consumption of the diet, have been shown to involve a distributed corticolimbic circuitry, including the amygdala. Specifically, the central amygdala (CeA) has been shown to be involved in high-fat feeding within both opioid and food-deprivation driven models. The present experiments were conducted to examine the more specific role of CeA opioid transmission in mediating high-fat feeding driven by either intra-Acb administration of the μ-opioid agonist d-Ala2-NMe-Phe4-Glyol5-enkephalin (DAMGO) or 24-h home cage food deprivation. Injection of DAMGO into the Acb (0.25 μg/0.5 μl/side) increased consumption of the high-fat diet, but this feeding was unaffected by administration of opioid antagonist, naltrexone (5 μg/0.25 μl/side) administered into the CeA. In contrast, intra-CeA naltrexone administration attenuated high-fat intake driven by 24-h food deprivation, demonstrating a specific role for CeA opioid transmission in high-fat consumption. Intra-CeA naltrexone administration alone had no effect on baseline feeding levels within either feeding model. These findings suggest that CeA opioid transmission mediates consumption of a palatable high-fat diet driven by short-term negative-energy balance (24-h food deprivation), but not intra-Acb opioid receptor activation.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
N-Phenylpropyl-N'-(3-methoxyphenethyl)piperazine (YZ-185) Attenuates the Conditioned-Rewarding Properties of Cocaine in Mice. - ISRN pharmacology
Sigma receptor antagonists diminish the effects of cocaine in behavioral assays, including conditioned place preference. Previous locomotor activity experiments in mice determined that the sigma receptor ligand YZ-185 (N-phenylpropyl-N'-(3-methoxyphenethyl)piperazine) enhanced cocaine-induced hyperactivity at a lower (0.1  μ mol/kg) dose and dose-dependently attenuated cocaine-induced hyperactivity at higher (3.16-31.6  μ mol/kg) doses. The present study investigated the effect of YZ-185 on cocaine's conditioned-rewarding properties in mice. YZ-185 (0.1, 0.316, 3.16, and 31.6  μ mol/kg) did not have intrinsic activity to produce conditioned place preference or aversion. A higher (31.6  μ mol/kg) YZ-185 dose, but not lower (0.1-3.16  μ mol/kg) YZ-185 doses, prevented the development of place preference to cocaine (66  μ mol/kg). YZ-185 did not alter the expression of cocaine place preference. To further characterize YZ-185's behavioral profile, its effects in the elevated zero maze and rotarod procedures were also determined; YZ-185 produced no significant change from baseline in either assay, indicating that the sigma receptors probed by YZ-185 do not regulate anxiety-like or coordinated motor skill behaviors. Overall, these results suggest that YZ-185 is a sigma receptor antagonist at the 31.6  μ mol/kg dose and demonstrate that sigma receptors can mediate the development of the conditioned-rewarding properties of cocaine.
Surgical pearls: laparoscopic removal of uterine remnants in patients with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. - Journal of pediatric and adolescent gynecology
Females with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome may require surgical removal of uterine remnant(s) which can be accomplished with a laparoscopic approach, described in this case series.Nine females with MRKH and pelvic pain were treated with laparoscopic resection of uterine remnants without major complication. The following management recommendations are offered: (1) preoperative evaluation for urinary tract anomalies and postoperative cystoscopy; (2) medial traction of the remnant to allow adequate exposure of the pelvic sidewall; (3) awareness of possible anomalous vascular supply to uterine remnant; (4) individualized management of associated endometriosis; (5) careful use of surgical terminology, avoiding use of the word hysterectomy.Laparoscopic removal of uterine remnant(s) is safe and effective.Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Physician and patient use of and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of infertility. - International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
To determine use of and attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among infertility patients and subspecialty physicians.Infertility patients were asked to complete anonymous written surveys at an academic infertility practice; members of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility were electronically surveyed. Both groups were assessed regarding their use of and attitudes toward CAM.The response rate was 32.1% (115/358) among patients and 22.6% (225/995) among physicians (P<0.05). In total, 105 (91.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 85.8-96.2) patients used CAM, and 84 (73.0%; 95% CI, 64.9-81.1) regarded it as beneficial to their fertility treatment. However, only 30 (26.1%; 95% CI, 18.0-34.0) patients reported CAM use to physicians, with the most common reason being that they were "never asked." Overall, 202 (89.8%; 95% CI, 85.9-93.8) physicians reported inquiring about CAM.Significant discrepancies exist between subfertile patients and physicians in attitudes toward the use of CAM. The current prevalence of CAM use among infertility patients requires greater physician attention and justifies further study on the risks and benefits of integrating CAM into the biomedical treatment of infertility.Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
A systematic review of the evidence for complementary and alternative medicine in infertility. - International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by patients and physicians has increased markedly in recent years. Many case reports, case series, and uncontrolled trials of varying quality have been completed; however, there is now a slowly increasing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the use of CAM.To identify, survey, and review RCTs investigating the use of CAM for infertility treatment.The MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were electronically searched.RCTs examining modalities for treatment or improvement of health status were reviewed.RCTs were included based on use of objective measures, articles written in English, availability through the University of Michigan database, and clear published clinical outcomes.Thirty-seven articles assessing a variety of CAM modalities met inclusion criteria. Acupuncture, selenium supplementation, weight loss, and psychotherapeutic intervention had 3 or more studies demonstrating beneficial effect. Other interventions had been studied less and evidence for them was limited.Although there is preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of some CAM interventions among infertile patients, many of these interventions require further investigation before they can be considered for routine clinical use.Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Uterine remnants and pelvic pain in females with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. - Journal of pediatric and adolescent gynecology
To assess the association between pelvic pain and uterine remnants and review the management of pelvic pain in females with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome.Retrospective cohort.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at a tertiary referring medical center.Forty-eight females with MRKH presenting from 1997 to 2011 with anatomy confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).None.Prevalence Of uterine remnants and the association of uterine remnants with pelvic pain in females with MRKH.Of the 48 females with MRKH, 23 (48%) had uterine remnants and 22 (46%) had pelvic pain. Presence of endometrium was associated with pelvic pain (RR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.2-4.7) in females with MRKH. Of the females with MKRH and pain, 9/22 had laparoscopy, with endometriosis seen in 5/9 of the uterine remnants at stages higher than are usually seen in teenagers (56%). Nine patients with pain and uterine remnants (8 with endometrium, 1 without) had laparoscopic removal of uterine remnants with resolution of pain.Given the high prevalence of uterine remnants in females with MRKH, anatomic evaluation with MRI should be considered when assessing the etiology of pelvic pain. Presence of endometrium within uterine remnants, and subsequent endometriosis, in females with MRKH may be associated with pelvic pain necessitating surgical or medical management.

Map & Directions

117 W Rush St Kendallville, IN 46755
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117 W Rush St
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