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Dr. Samer  Hasan  Md,Phd image

Dr. Samer Hasan Md,Phd

10663 Montgomery Rd
Cincinnati OH 45242
513 467-7292
Medical School: Vanderbilt University School Of Medicine - 1994
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1710982053
Taxonomy Codes:
207XX0005X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Samer Hasan is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:23472 Description:Reconstruct shoulder joint Average Price:$8,363.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,457.99
HCPCS Code:29827 Description:Arthroscop rotator cuff repr Average Price:$7,723.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,034.54
HCPCS Code:29823 Description:Shoulder arthroscopy/surgery Average Price:$6,486.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$254.20
HCPCS Code:23430 Description:Repair biceps tendon Average Price:$4,055.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$361.95
HCPCS Code:29826 Description:Shoulder arthroscopy/surgery Average Price:$3,422.53 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$175.20
HCPCS Code:73030 Description:X-ray exam of shoulder Average Price:$200.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.26
HCPCS Code:20610 Description:Drain/inject joint/bursa Average Price:$205.24 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.59
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$225.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$150.90
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$156.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$98.36
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$141.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$98.18
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$39.88
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$97.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.31
HCPCS Code:J1030 Description:Methylprednisolone 40 MG inj Average Price:$9.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.50

HCPCS Code Definitions

99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
29826
Arthroscopy, shoulder, surgical; decompression of subacromial space with partial acromioplasty, with coracoacromial ligament (ie, arch) release, when performed (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
J1030
Injection, methylprednisolone acetate, 40 mg
29823
Arthroscopy, shoulder, surgical; debridement, extensive
23472
Arthroplasty, glenohumeral joint; total shoulder (glenoid and proximal humeral replacement (eg, total shoulder))
23430
Tenodesis of long tendon of biceps
20610
Arthrocentesis, aspiration and/or injection; major joint or bursa (eg, shoulder, hip, knee joint, subacromial bursa)
29827
Arthroscopy, shoulder, surgical; with rotator cuff repair
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
73030
Radiologic examination, shoulder; complete, minimum of 2 views
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1982664264
Internal Medicine
389
1811989288
Internal Medicine
384
1538164769
Rheumatology
370
1700878162
Internal Medicine
370
1649204306
Anesthesiology
325
1407855315
Pain Management
306
1699757799
Diagnostic Radiology
256
1619978418
Internal Medicine
251
1922002252
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
249
1679576771
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
217
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Hasan has made to other doctors

Publications

Reverse shoulder arthroplasty using an implant with a lateral center of rotation: outcomes, complications, and the influence of experience. - American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has revolutionized treatment of arthritis and rotator cuff insufficiency and is performed using implants with either a medial or a lateral center of rotation. We conducted a study of the outcomes and the effect of surgeon learning after the first 60 consecutive lateral-center-of-rotation RSAs implanted by a single surgeon unaffiliated with the design team for this particular reverse shoulder prosthesis. At minimum 2-year followup, mean improvements in active forward elevation, abduction, and external rotation were 69°, 55°, and 23°, respectively; mean active internal rotation improved significantly as well (P < .001 for all). Mean Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores improved from 1.8 (range, 0-6) to 6.9 (range, 0-12) (P < .0001), and mean final American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 72 (range, 27-100). Final radiographs showed scapular notching in 5 shoulders (11%). Gains in SST scores, active forward elevation, and active abduction were lower for the first 15 cases than for the next 45 cases, and 5 of the 8 reoperations were performed after the first 15 cases. Overall improvements in active motion and self-assessed shoulder function in this series are comparable to those previously reported by the design team. Experience with RSA appears to influence efficacy, but the learning curve may not be as steep as previously reported.
Glenohumeral chondrolysis: part II--results of treatment. - Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
The objective of this 2-part study is to report on the etiology and disease progression (part I) and results of treatment (part II) of glenohumeral chondrolysis.Forty patients presented with glenohumeral chondrolysis after treatment elsewhere. Twenty patients have been followed since their initial presentation and before prosthetic shoulder arthroplasty (group 1), and 20 patients were referred either for management of complications arising after shoulder arthroplasty or for evaluation only (group 2). All patients underwent standardized clinical and radiographic examination and completed shoulder-specific self-assessment questionnaires at initial presentation and after prosthetic shoulder arthroplasty for patients in group 1.Thirty of 40 patients underwent subsequent arthroscopy for debridement, chondroplasty, capsular release, or a combination of these procedures. Of these, 23 patients (77%) required additional surgery, comprising 18 prosthetic shoulder arthroplasties performed at a mean 13 months of follow-up (range, 3 to 33 months), as well as 5 repeated arthroscopies. At most recent follow-up, 15 of 20 patients in group 1 had undergone shoulder arthroplasty, with improvements in active forward elevation from 92.6° to 140.0° (P < .0001), active abduction from 81.6° to 131.3° (P < .0001), active external rotation from 22.1° to 49.3° (P < .0001), and active internal rotation from the gluteal region to the T12 spinous process (P < .001). Pain scores improved from 6.4 to 3.4 (P < .01), and self-assessed outcome also improved significantly. Twelve patients in group 2 underwent shoulder arthroplasty, so overall 27 of 40 patients (68%) underwent prosthetic shoulder arthroplasty for chondrolysis at a mean of 32 months (range, 9 to 66 months) after the index procedure.Postarthroscopic glenohumeral chondrolysis is a devastating condition that strikes young patients, responds poorly to arthroscopic interventions, and often requires shoulder arthroplasty within a few years. Patients can expect improved range of motion and outcome after shoulder arthroplasty, but pain relief is often incomplete.Level IV, therapeutic case series.Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Glenohumeral chondrolysis: part I--clinical presentation and predictors of disease progression. - Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
The objective of this 2-part study is to report on the etiology, clinical findings, and predictors of disease progression (part I) and the results of treatment (part II) in a group of patients with glenohumeral chondrolysis.Forty patients presented with glenohumeral chondrolysis after treatment elsewhere. Twenty patients have been followed up since their initial presentation before arthroplasty (group 1), and 20 patients were referred either for management of complications arising after prosthetic arthroplasty or for evaluation only (group 2).Thirty-seven patients received an intra-articular pain pump (IAPP) delivering bupivacaine, and 3 patients had prominent suture anchors or tacks. Symptoms related to chondrolysis developed in patients at a mean of 9.8 months (range, 1 to 34 months) after the index procedure. Radiographs showed joint space obliteration in 30 of 40 patients at most recent follow-up or before arthroplasty. Of the patients receiving an IAPP delivering bupivacaine, the majority received 0.5% with epinephrine. Higher bupivacaine dose (P < .05) and female gender (P < .05) were associated with a longer interval to onset of symptoms. In addition, a shorter interval to onset of symptoms predicted the need for subsequent surgery (P < .05) and a shorter interval to second-look arthroscopy (P < .001).Post-arthroscopic glenohumeral chondrolysis is a devastating and rapidly evolving condition that most often strikes young patients. The use of IAPPs delivering local anesthetics should be abandoned because nearly all cases of glenohumeral chondrolysis in this series were associated with their use.Level IV, therapeutic case series.Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Controlled-release formulation of antihistamine based on cetirizine zinc-layered hydroxide nanocomposites and its effect on histamine release from basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells. - International journal of nanomedicine
A controlled-release formulation of an antihistamine, cetirizine, was synthesized using zinc-layered hydroxide as the host and cetirizine as the guest. The resulting well-ordered nanolayered structure, a cetirizine nanocomposite "CETN," had a basal spacing of 33.9 Å, averaged from six harmonics observed from X-ray diffraction. The guest, cetirizine, was arranged in a horizontal bilayer between the zinc-layered hydroxide (ZLH) inorganic interlayers. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies indicated that the intercalation takes place without major change in the structure of the guest and that the thermal stability of the guest in the nanocomposites is markedly enhanced. The loading of the guest in the nanocomposites was estimated to be about 49.4% (w/w). The release study showed that about 96% of the guest could be released in 80 hours by phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 compared with about 97% in 73 hours at pH 4.8. It was found that release was governed by pseudo-second order kinetics. Release of histamine from rat basophilic leukemia cells was found to be more sensitive to the intercalated cetirizine in the CETN compared with its free counterpart, with inhibition of 56% and 29%, respectively, at 62.5 ng/mL. The cytotoxicity assay toward Chang liver cells line show the IC₅₀ for CETN and ZLH are 617 and 670 μg/mL, respectively.
Predictors of outcome after nonoperative and operative treatment of adhesive capsulitis. - The American journal of sports medicine
Few studies regarding adhesive capsulitis have concurrently evaluated nonoperative and operative treatment.The objectives were to evaluate the efficacy of operative and nonoperative treatment of adhesive capsulitis and to determine predictors of clinical outcome.Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.At minimum 24 months' follow-up, 85 patients underwent self-assessment using the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, including 24 patients treated operatively.Mean number of yes responses on the SST improved from 4.0 ± 2.7 at initial presentation to 9.9 ± 2.8 at final follow-up (P < .0001). Patients who received nonoperative treatment and patients who underwent surgery demonstrated similar improvements on the SST. For the entire cohort, forward elevation and external rotation at the side improved from 119° ± 20° to 152° ± 15° and from 29° ± 18° to 46° ± 11° (P < .0001), respectively, between initial presentation and discharge from treatment. Internal rotation to the back improved from the gluteal area to the thoracolumbar junction (P < .0001). Improvements in forward elevation and external rotation were greater for patients undergoing surgery. After nonoperative treatment, patients with diabetes had a lower final SST than patients without diabetes (P < .05). For the entire cohort, initial SST predicted final SST (P < .05), and a shorter duration of symptoms predicted a higher final ASES score (P < .05). Younger patients (P < .001) and those with a lower initial SST (P < .05) were more likely to undergo surgery.A multimodal nonoperative treatment program is effective for most patients with adhesive capsulitis. Patients who do not improve, including those with diabetes, respond well to manipulation and arthroscopic release. Residual motion deficits at discharge from treatment do not appear to affect longer-term clinical outcome.
Early Results of Concurrent Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff and Type II Superior Labral Anterior Posterior Tears. - Sports health
Recent reports on concurrent arthroscopic rotator cuff and type II superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) repair have raised concerns over postoperative stiffness and patient satisfaction. However, it is unclear if the observed stiffness relates to the repair of degenerative SLAP tears in older adults, the surgical technique, the postoperative rehabilitation, or to a combination of these factors.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome and repair integrity of concurrent arthroscopic rotator cuff and type II SLAP repair.Case series.Of 11 patients identified, 7 had a full-thickness rotator cuff tear and 4 had a high-grade partial thickness tear that was completed. A cannula placed through the rotator cuff tear improved the trajectory for posterior suture anchor placement during SLAP repair. Postoperative rehabilitation employed continuous passive motion to prevent stiffness.At minimum of 1-year follow-up, mean yes responses on the Simple Shoulder Test improved from 5.4 to 10.7 (out of 12; P < .01), and mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved from 40 to 87 (out of 100; P < .01). Mean forward elevation improved from 148° to 161° (P < .01) and external rotation from 58° to 67° (P < .01). Magnetic resonance imaging, obtained at most recent follow-up in 10 patients, demonstrated a healed SLAP tear in all patients and a persistent rotator cuff defect in 1 patient.Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair can be successfully combined with type II SLAP repair in relatively young patients who have sustained traumatic injury to their shoulders. Allowing early passive motion may help prevent postoperative stiffness without compromising rotator cuff healing.
The distribution of shoulder replacement among surgeons and hospitals is significantly different than that of hip or knee replacement. - Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
Practice is the repetition of an action to improve its quality. The value of the practice effect is recognized in sports, music, and surgery. The number of times a surgical procedure is performed may have a bearing on how well it is done. We investigated the relative frequency with which hip, knee, and shoulder replacements are performed by individual surgeons. The 1998 database of the Center for Medical Consumers in New York State revealed that over 40% of hip or knee replacement surgeons performed 10 or more replacements. In contrast, only 10 shoulder replacement surgeons (3%) performed 10 or more such procedures; 75% performed only one or two. The distribution of shoulder replacement among surgeons was statistically different than for hip or knee replacement (P <.0001). These findings suggest the need for robust educational programs to minimize the potential adverse effects of low surgeon volume for the patients undergoing these procedures.
Characteristics of unsatisfactory shoulder arthroplasties. - Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
Failure of shoulder arthroplasty is often defined as a complication or the need for revision, but it may also be viewed as a result that does not meet the expectations of the patient. To enhance our understanding of failed shoulder arthroplasties, we identified the characteristics common to a series of 139 consecutive patients who came to our shoulder consultation service because of dissatisfaction with the result of their shoulder arthroplasty. Primary osteoarthritis (28%) and proximal humeral fractures (26%) were the most common indications for the initial arthroplasty. Seventy-three shoulders (fifty-two percent) had at least one surgery before arthroplasty was performed. Seventy-four percent of the shoulders were stiff, 35% were unstable, and in the total shoulders, 59% of the glenoids were loose. Components were substantially malpositioned in 23%. Forty-two percent of shoulders with a failed hemiarthroplasty had substantial glenoid erosion, and 43% of shoulders that had undergone a hemiarthroplasty for fracture had nonunion of the tuberosities. Patients demonstrated impaired shoulder function; on average, they could perform only 2 of 12 shoulder functions. The rate of revision underestimated the rate of failure, as 23% of arthroplasties did not undergo revision. The challenge of achieving patient satisfaction after arthroplasty may be greater than previously recognized. Many of these unsatisfactory shoulder arthroplasties did not meet the criteria for failure used in previously published series. These observations suggest that greater attention to achieving proper component position, postoperative motion, and in fracture cases, fixation of the tuberosities may lead to increased patient satisfaction after shoulder arthroplasty.
Nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head. - Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
The humeral head is the second most common site for nontraumatic osteonecrosis after the femoral head, yet it has attracted relatively little attention. Osteonecrosis is associated with many conditions, such as corticosteroid use, sickle-cell disease, alcoholism, dysbarism (or caisson disease), Gaucher's disease, and other systemic conditions. The diagnosis is a clinical and radiographic one, the latter forming the basis for its staging. Treatment depends on the chronicity and severity of symptoms, as well as the degree of clinical and radiographic progression. Surgical treatment includes arthroscopic debridement and core decompression for early osteonecrosis and hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder arthroplasty for more advanced disease. This report reviews osteonecrosis of the humeral head, with an emphasis on current treatment options.

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10663 Montgomery Rd Cincinnati, OH 45242
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