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Dr. Anita  Mathews  Dmd image

Dr. Anita Mathews Dmd

1613 Central St
Stoughton MA 02072
781 410-0320
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: DN1856131
NPI: 1679823710
Taxonomy Codes:
1223G0001X

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Publications

Detection of cervical lesions by multivariate analysis of diffuse reflectance spectra: a clinical study. - Lasers in medical science
Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy is a non-invasive, real-time, and cost-effective tool for early detection of malignant changes in squamous epithelial tissues. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic power of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for non-invasive discrimination of cervical lesions in vivo. A clinical trial was carried out on 48 sites in 34 patients by recording DR spectra using a point-monitoring device with white light illumination. The acquired data were analyzed and classified using multivariate statistical analysis based on principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Diagnostic accuracies were validated using random number generators. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted for evaluating the discriminating power of the proposed statistical technique. An algorithm was developed and used to classify non-diseased (normal) from diseased sites (abnormal) with a sensitivity of 72 % and specificity of 87 %. While low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) could be discriminated from normal with a sensitivity of 56 % and specificity of 80 %, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) from normal with a sensitivity of 89 % and specificity of 97 %, LSIL could be discriminated from HSIL with 100 % sensitivity and specificity. The areas under the ROC curves were 0.993 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.0 to 1) and 1 (95 % CI 1) for the discrimination of HSIL from normal and HSIL from LSIL, respectively. The results of the study show that DR spectroscopy could be used along with multivariate analytical techniques as a non-invasive technique to monitor cervical disease status in real time.
Differences in African-American Maternal Self-Efficacy Regarding Practices Impacting Risk for Sudden Infant Death. - Journal of community health
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related deaths, including accidental suffocation, account for ~4000 US deaths annually. Parents may have higher self-efficacy with regards to preventing accidental suffocation than SIDS. The objective of this study was to assess self-efficacy in African-American mothers with regards to safe sleep practices and risk for SIDS and accidental suffocation. As part of randomized clinical trial in African-American mothers of newborn infants, mothers completed a baseline survey about knowledge of and attitudes towards safe sleep recommendations, current intent, self-efficacy, and demographics. Tabular and adjusted, regression-based analyses of these cross-sectional data evaluated the impact of the message target (SIDS risk reduction vs. suffocation prevention) on perceived self-efficacy. 1194 mothers were interviewed. Mean infant age was 1.5 days. 90.8 % of mothers planned to place their infant supine, 96.7 % stated that their infant would sleep in the same room, 3.6 % planned to bedshare with the infant, and 72.9 % intended to have soft bedding in the crib. Mothers were more likely to believe that prone placement (70.9 vs. 50.5 %, p < 0.001), bedsharing (73.5 vs. 50.1 %, p < 0.001), and having soft bedding in the sleep area (78.3 vs. 59.5 %, p < 0.001) increased their infant's risk for suffocation than it did for SIDS. Mothers had higher self-efficacy, viz. increased confidence that their actions could keep their infant safe, with regards to suffocation than SIDS (88.0 vs. 79.4 %, p < 0.001). These differences remained significant when controlled for sociodemographics, grandmother in home, number of people in home, and breastfeeding intention. Maternal self-efficacy is higher with regards to prevention of accidental suffocation in African-Americans, regardless of sociodemographics. Healthcare professionals should discuss both SIDS risk reduction and prevention of accidental suffocation when advising African-American parents about safe sleep practices.
Comparison of Infant Sleep Practices in African-American and US Hispanic Families: Implications for Sleep-Related Infant Death. - Journal of immigrant and minority health / Center for Minority Public Health
African-American and Hispanic families share similar socioeconomic profiles. Hispanic rates of sleep-related infant death are four times lower than African-American rates. We conducted a cross-sectional, multi-modal (surveys, qualitative interviews) study to compare infant care practices that impact risk for sleep-related infant death in African-American and Hispanic families. We surveyed 422 African-American and 90 Hispanic mothers. Eighty-three African-American and six Hispanic mothers participated in qualitative interviews. African-American infants were more likely to be placed prone (p < 0.001), share the bed with the parent (p < 0.001), and to be exposed to smoke (p < 0.001). Hispanic women were more likely to breastfeed (p < .001), while African-American women were more knowledgeable about SIDS. Qualitative interviews indicate that, although African-American and Hispanic parents had similar concerns, behaviors differed. Although the rationale for infant care decisions was similar for African-American and Hispanic families, practices differed. This may help to explain the racial/ethnic disparity seen in sleep-related infant deaths.
Radiation induced osteogenic sarcoma of the maxilla. - World journal of surgical oncology
Radiation induced sarcoma arise as a long term complication of radiation treatment for other benign or malignant conditions. They are of very rare occurrence in jaw bones and are even rarer in maxilla.Here we report a case of radiation induced sarcoma in a patient treated for squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa with radiation who developed osteosarcoma of maxillary bone after six years. The patient was treated successfully with surgery.What should be the best treatment of radiation induced sarcoma is still debatable; however, surgery offers the best chance of cure. Role of reradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be further evaluated.
Health Messaging and African-American Infant Sleep Location: A Randomized Controlled Trial. - Journal of community health
Infant-parent bedsharing increases the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related deaths. Despite AAP recommendations to avoid bedsharing, public health efforts have been unsuccessful in changing behaviors. African-American infants are more than twice as likely to die from SIDS and other sleep-related deaths, and are also twice as likely to bedshare with their parents. Further, African-American parents have a high degree of self-efficacy with regards to preventing infant suffocation, but low self-efficacy with regards to SIDS risk reduction. It is unclear whether messages emphasizing suffocation prevention will decrease bedsharing. To evaluate the impact of specific health messages on African-American parental decisions regarding infant sleep location. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial of African-American mothers of infants. The control group received standard messaging emphasizing AAP-recommended safe sleep practices, including avoidance of bedsharing, for the purposes of SIDS risk reduction. The intervention group received enhanced messaging emphasizing safe sleep practices, including avoidance of bedsharing, for both SIDS risk reduction and suffocation prevention. Participants completed interviews at 2-3 weeks, 2-3 months, and 5-6 months after the infant's birth. 1194 mothers were enrolled in the study, and 637 completed all interviews. Bedsharing, both usually (aOR 1.005 [95 % CI 1.003, 1.006]) and last night (aOR 1.004 [95 % CI 1.002, 1.007]) increased slightly but statistically significantly with infant age (p < 0.001). Receipt of the enhanced message did not impact on sleep location. Maternal belief that bedsharing increased the risk of SIDS or suffocation declined over 6 months (p < 0.001) and did not differ by group assignment. African-American mothers who received an enhanced message about SIDS risk reduction and suffocation prevention were no less likely to bedshare with their infants.Clinical Trials.gov identifier NCT01361880.
Messaging Affects the Behavior of African American Parents with Regards to Soft Bedding in the Infant Sleep Environment: A Randomized Controlled Trial. - The Journal of pediatrics
To evaluate the impact of specific health messages on the decisions of African American parents regarding soft bedding use, specifically related to the high degree of self-efficacy that African American parents have with regards to preventing infant suffocation vs low self-efficacy with regards to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) risk reduction.We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial of African American mothers of infants. The control group received standard messaging emphasizing safe sleep practices recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics for the purposes of SIDS risk reduction. The intervention group received enhanced messaging emphasizing safe sleep practices for both SIDS risk reduction and suffocation prevention. Participants completed interviews at 2-3 weeks, 2-3 months, and 5-6 months after the infant's birth.Of 1194 mothers enrolled, 637 completed all interviews. The use of soft bedding both in the past week and last night declined with age (P < .001). Infants in the enhanced group had a lower rate of use of soft bedding in the past week (P = .006) and last night (P = .013). Mothers who received the enhanced message were more likely to state that they avoided soft bedding to protect their infant from suffocation.African American mothers who receive an enhanced message about SIDS risk reduction and suffocation prevention are less likely to use soft bedding in their infant's sleep environment.ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01361880.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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