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Dr. David  Fribourg  Md image

Dr. David Fribourg Md

4733 W Sunset Blvd
Los Angeles CA 90027
323 834-4011
Medical School: Harvard Medical School - 1997
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: A67953
NPI: 1679644611
Taxonomy Codes:
207XS0117X

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Incidence of subsequent vertebral fracture after kyphoplasty. - Spine
A retrospective review of charts and radiographs of all consecutive patients who underwent kyphoplasty at the authors' center from the initial procedure in September 2000 to the end of the collection period in July 2002.The best available natural history data would suggest that after experiencing an osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture, patients have a 19% incidence of subsequent fracture in the following year when no surgical intervention is performed. When kyphoplasty is performed, there are conflicting data regarding the incidence of subsequent fracture, ranging anywhere from 3 to 29%. These fractures occur at adjacent levels between 30 and 90% of the time, with no clear explanation for the wide variation in the results of three different studies. There are biomechanical data to suggest that injection of cement does increase the stiffness of the treated vertebra and that this increases strain on adjacent vertebrae, especially in forward bending.A database was created containing patient age, gender, height, weight, medication history, comorbidities, fracture levels, and pain level before and after surgery. Subsequent fractures were confirmed with radiographs and MRI. Statistical analysis was performed.Thirty-eight patients (10 men and 28 women) were treated for 47 levels initially. L1 and L2 were the most common level of fracture managed initially. The gender, smoking and medication history, location of fracture, and number of fracture levels of the patients did not correlate with the risk of subsequent fracture. Over the follow-up period (average, 8 months), 10 patients sustained 17 subsequent fractures. Eight patients sustained fractures in the first 2 months after the index procedure, all with at least one fracture at an adjacent level. Of the 17 subsequent fractures, there were nine at the adjacent-above levels, four at adjacent-below levels, and four at remote levels. The remote fractures occurred at significantly greater time intervals after the index procedure (P < 0.001).This study demonstrated a higher rate of subsequent fracture after kyphoplasty compared with natural history data for untreated fractures. Most of these occurred at an adjacent level within 2 months of the index procedure. After this 2-month period, there were only occasional subsequent fractures, which occurred at remote levels. This confirms biomechanical studies showing that cement augmentation places additional stress on adjacent levels. Patients with an increase in back pain after kyphoplasty should be evaluated carefully for subsequent adjacent fractures, especially during the first 2 months after the index procedure.
Occult spinal cord abnormalities in children referred for orthopedic complaints. - American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
This study reviews spinal cord abnormalities found in children initially referred for an orthopedic problem. Over a 5-year period in an academic pediatric orthopedic referral clinic, 167 children aged 3 months to 18 years (average, 9.4 years) underwent spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and had records available for review. The patients were divided into 7 major groups based on the primary indication for the MRI. The frequency of spinal cord pathology was as follows: 3 of 35 patients with atypical idiopathic scoliosis, 1 of 19 with neuromuscular scoliosis, 6 of 18 with congenital scoliosis, 1 of 50 with unexplained back pain, 3 of 17 with gait abnormality, 5 of 14 with limb pain or weakness, and 4 of 8 with rigid or recurrent foot deformity. Spine MRI was not very helpful in evaluating children who had some degree of back pain without neurological signs or symptoms. However, the spine MRI was helpful in evaluating children with atypical idiopathic scoliosis or congenital scoliosis, gait abnormality, limb pain or weakness, or rigid or recurrent foot deformities. Given the high frequency of occult spinal cord abnormality in children with severe foot deformity, the use of screening spine MRI may be especially useful in this group.
ProDisc artificial total lumbar disc replacement: introduction and early results from the United States clinical trial. - Spine
Multicenter prospective randomized study of artificial disc replacement (ProDisc) versus circumferential fusion (standard of care) for one- and two-level degenerative disc disease. This is an interim analysis on patients seen at the Spine Institute Saint John's Health Center, Santa Monica, California.To evaluate early pain and functional outcomes of patients treated with disc replacement or fusion and to assess the capacity of this intervertebral disc replacement for preserving motion in the lumbar spine.Disc replacement is intended to reduce pain via removal of the diseased disc while restoring physiologic motion and height at the affected level. The long-term physiologic advantage of disc replacement to fusion is that preservation of motion may prevent additional degeneration at adjacent levels.Patients meeting inclusion criteria were consented for study. Randomization was performed using a 2 to 1 ratio of disc replacement procedure to a fusion procedure. Patients rated their pain on the Visual Analogue Scale and completed the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire. Radiographs were taken. Assessments were made before surgery and after surgery at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year (ongoing). Changes from preoperative pain, disability, or motion were separately evaluated as a function of treatment using repeated measures mixed design analysis of variance.This analysis includes data up to 6 months from the first 53 randomized patients. There were 35 patients who underwent disc replacements, and 18 patients had fusion procedures. Disc replacement patients had a significant reduction in pain and disability at earlier evaluations. By 6 months, the relative improvement on both the Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry (both, P < 0.05) were similar for disc replacement and fusion patients. Greater motion was found at L4-L5 for disc replacement patients (P < 0.05) than fusion patients. A similar trend was noted at L5-S1 (P was not significant).Disc replacement patients reported significantly less pain (Visual Analogue Scale) and disability (Oswestry) in the early period following surgery compared to fusion patients. This difference disappeared by 6 months. When compared to fusion, the disc replacement allowed preservation of motion at L4-L5 with a similar trend at L5-S1.

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