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Dr. John  Rowe  Md image

Dr. John Rowe Md

727 E Court St
Paris IL 61944
217 658-8411
Medical School: University Of Southern California School Of Medicine - 1983
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1679539019
Taxonomy Codes:
207X00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. John Rowe is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:20610 Description:Drain/inject joint/bursa Average Price:$158.10 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.01
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$273.50 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$195.05
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$213.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$156.91
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$158.10 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$102.04
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$138.80 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$100.78
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$99.46 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.94
HCPCS Code:J0702 Description:Betamethasone acet&sod phosp Average Price:$14.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$5.55

HCPCS Code Definitions

99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
20610
Arthrocentesis, aspiration and/or injection; major joint or bursa (eg, shoulder, hip, knee joint, subacromial bursa)
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
J0702
Injection, betamethasone acetate 3mg and betamethasone sodium phosphate 3mg

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1205916236
Internal Medicine
3,074
1942319934
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,224
1720142128
Emergency Medicine
697
1194799742
Hematology/Oncology
660
1871520734
Diagnostic Radiology
658
1033266044
Psychiatry
471
1649381690
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
387
1104937044
Urology
385
1104855253
Internal Medicine
362
1255448916
Pulmonary Disease
351
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Rowe has made to other doctors

Publications

Double-blind, placebo-controlled, 1:1 randomized Phase III clinical trial of Immunoxel honey lozenges as an adjunct immunotherapy in 269 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. - Immunotherapy
Safer and shorter antituberculosis treatment (ATT) regimens represent the unmet medical need.The patients were randomly assigned into two arms: the first (n = 137) received once-daily sublingual honey lozenge formulated with botanical immunomodulator Immunoxel and the second (n = 132) received placebo lozenges along with conventional ATT. Immunoxel and placebo arms were demographically similar: 102 versus 106 had drug-susceptible TB; 28 versus 20 multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB); 7 versus 7 extensively drug resistant TB (XDR-TB); and 22 versus 20 TB-HIV. The primary end point was sputum smear conversion.After 1 month 87 out 132 (65.9%) of Immunoxel recipients became sputum smear negative, whereas 32 out of 127 (25.2%) in placebo group had converted (p < 0.0001). Sputum clearance produced by Immunoxel was equally effective across all forms of TB. In the immunotherapy arm the average weight gain was 2 kg, but placebo recipients gained only 0.6 kg. Immunoxel reduced TB-associated inflammation as evidenced by defervescence and normalization of elevated leukocyte counts and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. No adverse effects were seen at any time. The liver function tests indicate that ATT-caused hepatotoxicity was counteracted by Immunoxel. These results are in agreement with prior 20 trials of Immunoxel conducted over the past 17 years.Immunoxel is affordable, safe, effective, fast-acting, commercially available immunotherapeutic intervention to supplement conventional TB chemotherapy. ( Clinicaltrials.gov ID NCT01061593).
Thermal and substrate color-induced melanization in laboratory reared red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans). - Journal of thermal biology
Color and pigmentation patterns of the integument can facilitate crypsis, thermoregulation, and social signaling. According to the "thermal melanism hypothesis", cold environmental temperature should increase the quantity of melanin that is deposited in the integument thereby facilitating radiative warming. We studied the influences of water temperature (26°C or 31°C) and substrate color (black or white) on the degree of melanization in the red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta elegans, under laboratory conditions. Turtles reared on a black substrate, or in 26°C water, for 120 days were darker than those reared on a white substrate or in 31°C water. A potential tradeoff between the fitness benefits of crypsis and the benefits of radiative warming through melanism was detected because turtles reared in 26°C water and on a white substrate were darker than those reared on a white substrate and in 31°C water. Low temperatures limited metabolic processes because turtles reared in 26°C water grew more slowly than those reared in 31°C water. However, histological analyses revealed that melanization was a dynamic process in all treatments confirming that the degree of melanization in the cool water treatment was not influenced by the initial and relatively dark hatchling coloration in individuals that grew relatively slowly.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Use of Intensive Care Services for Medicare Beneficiaries Undergoing Major Surgical Procedures. - Anesthesiology
Use of intensive care after major surgical procedures and whether routinely admitting patients to intensive care units (ICUs) improve outcomes or increase costs is unknown.The authors examined frequency of admission to an ICU during the hospital stay for Medicare beneficiaries undergoing selected major surgical procedures: elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, cystectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, esophagectomy, and elective open AAA repair. The authors compared hospital mortality, length of stay, and Medicare payments for patients receiving each procedure in hospitals admitting patients to the ICU less than 50% of the time (low use), 50 to 89% (moderate use), and 90% or greater (high use), adjusting for patient and hospital factors.The cohort ranged from 7,878 patients in 162 hospitals for esophagectomies to 69,989 patients in 866 hospitals for endovascular AAA. Overall admission to ICU ranged from 35.6% (endovascular AAA) to 71.3% (open AAA). Admission to ICU across hospitals ranged from less than 5% to 100% of patients for each surgical procedure. There was no association between hospital use of intensive care and mortality for any of the five surgical procedures. There was a consistent association between high use of intensive care with longer length of hospital stay and higher Medicare payments only for endovascular AAA.There is little consensus regarding the need for intensive care for patients undergoing major surgical procedures and no relationship between a hospital's use of intensive care and hospital mortality. There is also no consistent relationship across surgical procedures between use of intensive care and either length of hospital stay or payments for care.
Social Predictors of Active Life Engagement: A Time-Use Study of Young-Old French Adults. - Research on aging
Active life engagement is important for successful aging of societies and individuals. We tested predictors of engagement in French adults aged 60-74 (the GAZEL cohort).Participants (n = 10,764) reported the previous day's activities in a time-use survey. We modeled concurrent social, demographic, and health predictors of participation incidence and intensity in paid work, volunteering, caregiving, community involvement, and informal social interaction.Men were more active in volunteering/community activities and women in caregiving and informal social interaction. Participation varied inversely with socioeconomic status (SES). Paid work participation declined linearly with age and health status, but this relationship did not hold for other activities.Men and those of higher SES were more likely to participate in certain activities than were women and those of low lifetime SES, potentially limiting the latter groups' future health and well-being benefits from such activities. Findings suggest groups that could benefit from interventions to increase engagement.© The Author(s) 2015.
Substrate color-induced melanization in eight turtle species from four chelonian groups. - Zoology (Jena, Germany)
Background color convergence of prey occurring through local adaptation or phenotypically plastic responses can reduce predation rates by visual predators. We assessed the capacity for substrate color-induced melanization in eight turtle species within the groups Chelydridae, Emydidae, Kinosternidae, and Trionychidae by rearing individuals on black or white substrates for 160 days. In all aquatic turtle species, integuments of the head and carapace of the individuals that were reared on a black substrate were darker than of those reared on a white substrate. In the terrestrial turtle Terrapene carolina carolina, however, no significant differences in dorsal head skin or carapace color were observed between treatments. Histological examination of tail tips in three aquatic species (Chelydra serpentina serpentina, Graptemys geographica, and Trachemys scripta elegans) indicated that substrate color-induced melanization is morphological, involving the transfer of melanosomes from basal epidermal melanocytes to adjacent keratinocytes. Interestingly, substrate color-induced melanization in a previously studied Pleurodire species apparently involves physiological color change. We could not, however, rule out physiological components to color change in the turtles of our study.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
The feasibility of measuring frailty to predict disability and mortality in older medical intensive care unit survivors. - Journal of critical care
To determine whether frailty can be measured within 4 days prior to hospital discharge in older intensive care unit (ICU) survivors of respiratory failure and whether it is associated with post-discharge disability and mortality.We performed a single-center prospective cohort study of 22 medical ICU survivors age 65 years or older who had received noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours. Frailty was defined as a score of ≥3 using Fried's 5-point scale. We measured disability with the Katz Activities of Daily Living. We estimated unadjusted associations between Fried's frailty score and incident disability at 1-month and 6-month mortality using Cox proportional hazard models.The mean (SD) age was 77 (9) years, mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 27 (9.7), mean frailty score was 3.4 (1.3), and 18 (82%) were frail. Nine subjects (41%) died within 6 months, and all were frail. Each 1-point increase in frailty score was associated with a 90% increased rate of incident disability at 1-month (rate ratio: 1.9, 95% CI 0.7-4.9) and a threefold increase in 6-month mortality (rate ratio: 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.3).Frailty can be measured in older ICU survivors near hospital discharge and is associated with 6-month mortality in unadjusted analysis. Larger studies to determine if frailty independently predicts outcomes are warranted.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Daily and annual patterns of thermoregulation in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta marginata) living in a thermally variable marsh in Northern Michigan. - Journal of thermal biology
The capacity for an ectothermic reptile to thermoregulate has implications for many components of its life history. Over two years, we studied thermoregulation in a population of Midland painted turtles (Chrysemys picta marginata) in a shallow, thermally variable wetland during summer in Northern Michigan. Mean body temperature (Tb) of free-ranging turtles was greater in 2008 (25.8 °C) than in 2010 (19.7 °C). Laboratory determined thermoregulatory set point (Tset) ranged from 25 °C (Tset-min) to 31 °C (Tset-max) and was lower during the fall (17-26 °C). Deviations of Tb distributions from field measured operative temperatures (Te) and indices of thermoregulation indicated that C. picta marginata were capable of a limited degree of thermoregulation. Operative temperatures and thermal quality (de=|Tset-min-Te| and |Te-Tset-max|) cycled daily with maximal thermal quality occurring during late morning and late afternoon. The accuracy of thermoregulation (db=|Tset-min-Tb| and |Tb-Tset-max|) was maximal (db values were minimal) as Tb declined and traversed Tset during the late afternoon-early evening hours and was higher on cloudy days than on sunny days because relatively low Te values decreased the number of Tb values that were above Tset. Our index of thermal exploitation (Ex=frequency of Tb observations within Tset) was 36%, slightly lower than that reported for an Ontario population of C. picta marginata. Regression of db (thermal accuracy) on de (thermal quality) indicated that turtles invested more in thermoregulation when thermal quality was low and when water levels were high than when they were low. There were no intersexual differences in mean Tb throughout the year but females had relatively high laboratory determined Tb values in the fall, perhaps reflecting the importance of maintaining ovarian development prior to winter.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Substantial health and economic returns from delayed aging may warrant a new focus for medical research. - Health affairs (Project Hope)
Recent scientific advances suggest that slowing the aging process (senescence) is now a realistic goal. Yet most medical research remains focused on combating individual diseases. Using the Future Elderly Model--a microsimulation of the future health and spending of older Americans--we compared optimistic "disease specific" scenarios with a hypothetical "delayed aging" scenario in terms of the scenarios' impact on longevity, disability, and major entitlement program costs. Delayed aging could increase life expectancy by an additional 2.2 years, most of which would be spent in good health. The economic value of delayed aging is estimated to be $7.1 trillion over fifty years. In contrast, addressing heart disease and cancer separately would yield diminishing improvements in health and longevity by 2060--mainly due to competing risks. Delayed aging would greatly increase entitlement outlays, especially for Social Security. However, these changes could be offset by increasing the Medicare eligibility age and the normal retirement age for Social Security. Overall, greater investment in research to delay aging appears to be a highly efficient way to forestall disease, extend healthy life, and improve public health.
Chronic pain: challenges and opportunities for relieving suffering. - North Carolina medical journal
This issue of the NCMJ addresses the problem of chronic pain in North Carolina; its diagnosis and management in primary and specialty care; and the need to balance efficacy and safety when prescribing opioid medications, as these drugs are associated with significant potential for misuse and abuse. The commentaries in this issue not only address the use of opioids for the management of chronic pain but also explore various alternatives, including medical marijuana, epidural and other injections, surgery, acupuncture, and other integrative therapies. Articles in this issue also describe the management of chronic pain in palliative care, the ways in which mental health affects pain, and the unintended consequences of chronic pain management. Finally, this issue describes several initiatives across the state that are addressing the epidemic of prescription drug abuse; these initiatives are effecting systematic changes in clinical practice to more effectively manage chronic pain, protect patients, and minimize the negative impact of prescription drug abuse on communities.
Association between age and use of intensive care among surgical Medicare beneficiaries. - Journal of critical care
The purpose of this study is to determine the role age plays in use of intensive care for patients who have major surgery.Retrospective cohort study examining the association between age and admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) for all Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older who had a hospitalization for 1 of 5 surgical procedures: esophagectomy, cystectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (open AAA), and elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (endo AAA) from 2004 to 2008. The primary outcome was admission to an ICU. Secondary outcomes were complications and hospital mortality. We used multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression to adjust for other patient and hospital-level factors associated with each outcome.The percentage of hospitalized patients admitted to ICU ranged from 41.3% for endo AAA to 81.5% for open AAA. In-hospital mortality also varied, from 1.1% for endo AAA to 6.8% for esophagectomy. After adjusting for other factors, age was associated with admission to ICU for cystectomy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.56 [95% confidence interval, 1.36-1.78] for age 80-84+ years; 2.25 [1.85-2.75] for age 85+ years compared with age 65-69 years), pancreaticoduodenectomy (AOR, 1.26 [1.06-1.50] for age 80-84 years; 1.49 [1.11-1.99] for age 85+ years), and esophagectomy (AOR, 1.26 [1.02-1.55] for age 80-84 years; 1.28 [0.91-1.80] age 85+ years). Age was not associated with use of intensive care for open AAA or endo AAA. Older age was associated with increases in complication rates and in-hospital mortality for all 5 surgical procedures.The association between age and use of intensive care was procedure specific. Complication rates and in-hospital mortality increased with age for all 5 surgical procedures.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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727 E Court St Paris, IL 61944
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