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Dr. Melodie  Zamora  Md image

Dr. Melodie Zamora Md

17 & Chew Sts
Allentown PA 18105
610 694-4515
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: MT205185
NPI: 1649619578
Taxonomy Codes:
207V00000X

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Publications

Non-surgical management of the auto-amputated adnexa in the neonate: a report on two cases. - Journal of pediatric and adolescent gynecology
Prenatal ovarian torsion is a rare but significant gynecologic abnormality. Current literature has yet to establish standard management in the case of auto-amputated adnexa secondary to ovarian torsion in the neonate.We report 2 cases of abdominal masses that were diagnosed in the antenatal period and were clinically consistent with auto-amputated adnexa followed with serial ultrasonography until resolution.To our knowledge this is the first report in the literature to document resolution of 2 pelvic masses due to auto-amputated adnexa with expectant management. This suggests expectant management is an appropriate alternative to surgical management in carefully selected cases.Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Differential roles of migratory and resident DCs in T cell priming after mucosal or skin HSV-1 infection. - The Journal of experimental medicine
Although mucosal surfaces represent the main portal of entry for pathogens, the mechanism of antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) that patrol various mucosal tissues remains unclear. Instead, much effort has focused on the understanding of initiation of immune responses generated against antigens delivered by injection. We examined the contributions of migratory versus lymph node-resident DC populations in antigen presentation to CD4 and CD8 T cells after needle injection, epicutaneous infection, or vaginal mucosal herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 infection. We show that upon needle injection, HSV-1 became lymph-borne and was rapidly presented by lymph node-resident DCs to CD4 and CD8 T cells. In contrast, after vaginal HSV-1 infection, antigens were largely presented by tissue-derived migrant DCs with delayed kinetics. In addition, migrant DCs made more frequent contact with HSV-specific T cells after vaginal infection compared with epicutaneous infection. Thus, both migrant and resident DCs play an important role in priming CD8 and CD4 T cell responses, and their relative importance depends on the mode of infection in vivo.
Dendritic cells and B cells maximize mucosal Th1 memory response to herpes simplex virus. - The Journal of experimental medicine
Although the importance of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and neutralizing antibodies for antiviral defense is well known, the antiviral mechanism of Th1 remains unclear. We show that Th1 cells mediate noncytolytic antiviral protection independent of direct lysis through local secretion of IFN-gamma after herpes simplex virus (HSV) 2 infection. IFN-gamma acted on stromal cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, to prevent further viral replication and spread throughout the vaginal mucosa. Importantly, unlike other known Th1 defense mechanisms, this effector function did not require recognition of virally infected cells via MHC class II. Instead, recall Th1 response was elicited by MHC class II(+) antigen-presenting cells at the site of infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) were not required and only partially sufficient to induce a recall response from memory Th1 cells. Importantly, DCs and B cells together contributed to restimulating memory CD4 T cells to secrete IFN-gamma. In the absence of both DCs and B cells, immunized mice rapidly succumbed to HSV-2 infection and death. Thus, these results revealed a distinct mechanism by which memory Th1 cells mediate noncytolytic IFN-gamma-dependent antiviral protection after recognition of processed viral antigens by local DCs and B cells.
Nonmucosal alphavirus vaccination stimulates a mucosal inductive environment in the peripheral draining lymph node. - Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)
The strongest mucosal immune responses are induced following mucosal Ag delivery and processing in the mucosal lymphoid tissues, and much is known regarding the immunological parameters which regulate immune induction via this pathway. Recently, experimental systems have been identified in which mucosal immune responses are induced following nonmucosal Ag delivery. One such system, footpad delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP), led to the local production of IgA Abs directed against both expressed and codelivered Ags at multiple mucosal surfaces in mice. In contrast to the mucosal delivery pathway, little is known regarding the lymphoid structures and immunological components that are responsible for mucosal immune induction following nonmucosal delivery. In this study, we have used footpad delivery of VRP to probe the constituents of this alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. Following nonmucosal VRP delivery, J chain-containing, polymeric IgA Abs were detected in the peripheral draining lymph node (DLN), at a time before IgA detection at mucosal surfaces. Further analysis of the VRP DLN revealed up-regulated alpha4beta7 integrin expression on DLN B cells, expression of mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 on the DLN high endothelia venules, and production of IL-6 and CC chemokines, all characteristics of mucosal lymphoid tissues. Taken together, these results implicate the peripheral DLN as an integral component of an alternative pathway for mucosal immune induction. A further understanding of the critical immunological and viral components of this pathway may significantly improve both our knowledge of viral-induced immunity and the efficacy of viral-based vaccines.

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17 & Chew Sts Allentown, PA 18105
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