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Dr. Ilan  Cohen  Md image

Dr. Ilan Cohen Md

28 Throckmorton Lane
Old Bridge NJ 08857
732 796-6100
Medical School: Tufts University School Of Medicine - 1996
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 25MA072656
NPI: 1649374802
Taxonomy Codes:
207W00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:65855 Description:Laser surgery of eye Average Price:$1,844.56 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$360.63
HCPCS Code:66984 Description:Cataract surg w/iol 1 stage Average Price:$1,258.14 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$853.98
HCPCS Code:66984 Description:Cataract surg w/iol 1 stage Average Price:$1,188.85 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$814.18
HCPCS Code:66821 Description:After cataract laser surgery Average Price:$679.09 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$330.45
HCPCS Code:66982 Description:Cataract surgery complex Average Price:$1,377.94 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,121.75
HCPCS Code:68761 Description:Close tear duct opening Average Price:$289.79 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$200.94
HCPCS Code:65855 Description:Laser surgery of eye Average Price:$431.65 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$388.07
HCPCS Code:76519 Description:Echo exam of eye Average Price:$102.53 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.78
HCPCS Code:92012 Description:Eye exam established pat Average Price:$99.90 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$92.22
HCPCS Code:92250 Description:Eye exam with photos Average Price:$83.93 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$78.63
HCPCS Code:92133 Description:Cmptr ophth img optic nerve Average Price:$55.27 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$50.22
HCPCS Code:92226 Description:Special eye exam subsequent Average Price:$30.65 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.14
HCPCS Code:92225 Description:Special eye exam initial Average Price:$33.01 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.87
HCPCS Code:92004 Description:Eye exam new patient Average Price:$163.92 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$160.38
HCPCS Code:92025 Description:Corneal topography Average Price:$44.08 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.73
HCPCS Code:92020 Description:Special eye evaluation Average Price:$32.21 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$29.35
HCPCS Code:92014 Description:Eye exam & treatment Average Price:$135.87 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$133.26
HCPCS Code:92083 Description:Visual field examination(s) Average Price:$104.51 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$101.93
HCPCS Code:92132 Description:Cmptr ophth dx img ant segmt Average Price:$43.07 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$41.71
HCPCS Code:92134 Description:Cptr ophth dx img post segmt Average Price:$50.70 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$50.17

HCPCS Code Definitions

92225
Ophthalmoscopy, extended, with retinal drawing (eg, for retinal detachment, melanoma), with interpretation and report; initial
92004
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation with initiation of diagnostic and treatment program; comprehensive, new patient, 1 or more visits
92226
Ophthalmoscopy, extended, with retinal drawing (eg, for retinal detachment, melanoma), with interpretation and report; subsequent
92250
Fundus photography with interpretation and report
76519
Ophthalmic biometry by ultrasound echography, A-scan; with intraocular lens power calculation
68761
Closure of the lacrimal punctum; by plug, each
66984
Extracapsular cataract removal with insertion of intraocular lens prosthesis (1 stage procedure), manual or mechanical technique (eg, irrigation and aspiration or phacoemulsification)
66821
Discission of secondary membranous cataract (opacified posterior lens capsule and/or anterior hyaloid); laser surgery (eg, YAG laser) (1 or more stages)
65855
Trabeculoplasty by laser surgery, 1 or more sessions (defined treatment series)
65855
Trabeculoplasty by laser surgery, 1 or more sessions (defined treatment series)
66984
Extracapsular cataract removal with insertion of intraocular lens prosthesis (1 stage procedure), manual or mechanical technique (eg, irrigation and aspiration or phacoemulsification)
66982
Extracapsular cataract removal with insertion of intraocular lens prosthesis (1-stage procedure), manual or mechanical technique (eg, irrigation and aspiration or phacoemulsification), complex, requiring devices or techniques not generally used in routine cataract surgery (eg, iris expansion device, suture support for intraocular lens, or primary posterior capsulorrhexis) or performed on patients in the amblyogenic developmental stage
92012
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation, with initiation or continuation of diagnostic and treatment program; intermediate, established patient
92132
Scanning computerized ophthalmic diagnostic imaging, anterior segment, with interpretation and report, unilateral or bilateral
92134
Scanning computerized ophthalmic diagnostic imaging, posterior segment, with interpretation and report, unilateral or bilateral; retina
92133
Scanning computerized ophthalmic diagnostic imaging, posterior segment, with interpretation and report, unilateral or bilateral; optic nerve
92020
Gonioscopy (separate procedure)
92014
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation, with initiation or continuation of diagnostic and treatment program; comprehensive, established patient, 1 or more visits
92083
Visual field examination, unilateral or bilateral, with interpretation and report; extended examination (eg, Goldmann visual fields with at least 3 isopters plotted and static determination within the central 30°, or quantitative, automated threshold perimetry, Octopus program G-1, 32 or 42, Humphrey visual field analyzer full threshold programs 30-2, 24-2, or 30/60-2)
92025
Computerized corneal topography, unilateral or bilateral, with interpretation and report

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1154303295
Anesthesiology
1,960
1578546545
Optometry
1,571
1689656712
Optometry
529
1568442648
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
294
1215962618
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
245
1588605612
Family Practice
177
1871578724
Diagnostic Radiology
172
1235111584
Diagnostic Radiology
165
1881677664
Diagnostic Radiology
164
1639115850
Ophthalmology
148
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Cohen has made to other doctors

Publications

GnRH-antagonist programming versus GnRH agonist protocol: a randomized trial. - European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology
Testing the ability to program IVF GnRH-antagonist cycles to avoid weekend oocyte retrieval.Preliminary randomized clinical trial. Patients presenting an indication for IVF or IVF-ICSI were assigned into either the Treatment Group - GnRH antagonist protocol, programmed to start stimulatory agents on a Friday, with oral 2mg estradiol valerate twice a day from the 2nd day of cycle until the first Friday to follow, or to the Control Group - long luteal GnRH agonist protocol.The performance of 27 Treatment Group patients and 24 Control Group patients was analyzed. Cycle dynamics were not clinically or statistically different except for a significant difference in the number of follicles measuring ≥18 mm on hCG administration day. There were no differences in the number of aspirated ova, fertilization rates, embryo quality or number of embryos to be transferred. Pregnancy rate was 41.7% in the Treatment Group and 50% in the Control Group (P>0.5). Only one patient assigned to the Treatment Group had a weekend retrieval.Preliminary results demonstrate no compromise related to follicular estrogen programming in a GnRH antagonist protocol and provide reassurance regarding the ability to achieve programming goals.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in pediatric patients: our experience in the last ten years. - The Israel Medical Association journal : IMAJ
The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in children after cardiac surgery is well established. ECMO support is becoming an integral tool for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in specified centers.To review our use of ECMO over a 10 year period.All children supported with ECMO from 2000 to 2010 were reviewed. Most of these children suffered from cardiac anomalies. The patients were analyzed by age, weight, procedure, RACHS-1 when appropriate, length of support, and outcome.Sixty-two children were supported with ECMO; their median age was 3 months (range 0-216 months) and median weight 4.3 kg (range 1.9-51 kg). Thirty-four patients (52.3%) needed additional hemofiltration or dialysis due to renal failure. The children requiring ECMO support represented a wide spectrum of cardiac lesions; the most common procedure was arterial switch operation (27.4%, n=17). ECMO was required mainly for failure to separate from the heart-lung machine (n=55). The median duration of ECMO support was 4 days (range 1-14 days); 29 (46.7%) patients were weaned successfully from ECMO during this time period, and 5 of them died during hospitalization, yielding an overall hospital survival rate of 38.7%.ECMO support has significant survival benefit for patients with post-cardiotomy heart failure. Its early deployment should be considered in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
Massive pulmonary emboli in children: does fiber-optic-guided embolectomy have a role? Review of the literature and report of two cases. - Chest
Massive pulmonary emboli is a rare disease in children, with only 39 reported cases in the last 50 years. Almost 50% of the patients died suddenly without receiving medical treatment. Most of the patients who were managed medically (70% of the treated patients) underwent surgical pulmonary embolectomy with 80% survival. Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a blind procedure that can be improved by using intraoperative angioscopy. This technique was reported in adults with good results. In this article, we describe two pediatric patients who underwent fiber-optic-guided surgical pulmonary embolectomy. To our knowledge, this technique has never been reported in the pediatric population.
Embryo quality and implantation rates are not influenced by total motile count values in an ICSI programme: a novel point of view. - International journal of molecular epidemiology and genetics
Total motile count (TMC) is a useful tool for sperm evaluation, comprising both quantitative and motility parameters. Although frequently used, TMC has not yet been evaluated as a contributory variable for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles. In this study we evaluate the possible role of TMC as a prognostic parameter in cycles designated for ICSI. We also test the existence of a possible TMC-threshold value that might be predictive for ICSI cycle outcome in the everyday practice. This is a retrospective cohort study in which the research question is addressed by a locally weighted regression (LOESS) analysis. Primary outcome measures are fertilization rate, good quality embryos rate and implantation rate. A total of 666 patients were included, contributing 1456 cycles. The effect of TMC over the fertilization rate was significant, depicting an inverted U-shaped curve: with up to approximately 10 million motile sperm, fertilization rates increased as TMC increased, but from this point on decreased. A slight increment in the rate of good embryo formation with increasing value of TMC was noted, but this did not reach a statistical significance. TMC values demonstrated no effect in the case of implantation rates. ICSI may offer an advantage related to fertilization rates for the sub-fertile male population, with a motile sperm count up to 10 million.
Right ventricular outflow tract strategies for repair of tetralogy of Fallot: effect of monocusp valve reconstruction. - European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery
The absence of a pulmonary valve (PV) after tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair has been shown to impact postoperative right ventricular (RV) function. The purposes of this study were to (i) compare early outcomes after PV-sparing vs transannular patching (TAP) with monocusp valve reconstruction or TAP alone and (b) assess the mid-term results after polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane monocusp reconstruction.From 2003 to 2009, 163 patients underwent TOF repair. Sixty-nine patients (42.3%) underwent a PV-sparing procedure (Group A), 74 (45.4%) underwent PTFE membrane monocusp valve reconstruction (Group B) and 20 (12.3%) underwent TAP only (Group C). Early outcomes were evaluated by the right-to-left ventricular pressure ratio, RV outflow tract gradient, tricuspid and PV function, intensive care unit (ICU) parameters and need for reintervention. Group B patients were also evaluated at intermediate term for clinical and echocardiographic parameters, including tricuspid and monocusp valve function and mobility.The median age, weight and PV Z-value of Group B patients were significantly lower; 20.5 months, 9.3 kg and -4, respectively. Postoperatively, the right-to-left ventricular pressure ratio was <0.5 in all groups. Mechanical ventilation time, fluid drainage duration and total ICU stay showed no significant difference between Groups A and B, while Group C was significantly longer (P < 0.01). There were five (3%) early deaths: three from Group A and two from Group B. The incidences of moderate or severe pulmonary insufficiency (PI) on discharge were 8.2% in Group A, 9% in Group B and 50% in Group C (P < 0.001). Among Group B patients, 85% of the evaluated patients had less than moderate PI in the intermediate-term follow-up, QRS duration <140 ms in 83.3% and right-to-left ventricular diameter ratio of 0.6 ± 0.2. Two (2.6%) patients underwent reoperation for monocusp replacement. There were two (2.7%) mid-term deaths.The use of a PTFE membrane monocusp valve and a valve-sparing strategy prevents immediate PI and improves short-term clinical outcomes. PTFE membrane monocusp appears advantageous in preventing severe intermediate-term PI and facilitates the preservation of RV function.
Efficacy of laser in situ keratomileusis in correcting anterior and non-anterior corneal astigmatism: comparative study. - Journal of cataract and refractive surgery
To compare the efficacy of conventional laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in treating corneal astigmatism and in treating noncorneal ocular residual astigmatism.Private practice, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.Retrospective case series.The records of dominant eyes of consecutive patients who had LASIK were retrospectively analyzed to compare the efficacy of LASIK in eyes with predominantly anterior corneal astigmatism with the efficacy in eyes with predominantly ocular residual astigmatism (ORA). The ORA was determined by vector analysis using refractive cylinder and topographic astigmatism. Preoperatively, the ratio of ORA to preoperative refractive cylinder (R) was used to divide the patients into 2 groups; that is, eyes with predominantly anterior corneal astigmatism (ORA/R ratio <1.0) and eyes with predominantly ORA (ORA/R ratio ≥1.0). Efficacy was determined by examining the magnitude of the remaining uncorrected astigmatism and comparing the index of success (proportion of preoperative refractive astigmatism that remained uncorrected by LASIK) between the 2 groups.The study evaluated 61 eyes of 61 patients. Conventional LASIK was twice as efficacious in the low-ORA group as in the high-ORA group. The index of success was 0.24 and 0.50, respectively, and the difference between groups was statistically significant (P = .036).The efficacy of astigmatic correction by LASIK was significantly higher in eyes in which the preoperative refractive astigmatism was located mainly on the anterior corneal surface than in eyes in which it was mainly located posterior to the anterior corneal surface.Copyright © 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Neurologic involvement in a child with systemic capillary leak syndrome. - Pediatrics
Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) is a rare and life-threatening disorder of unknown pathology. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of shock resulting from leakage of plasma, which is reflected by accompanying hemoconcentration, hypoalbuminemia, and edema. Since its first description (Clarkson B, Thompson D, Horwith M, Luckey A. Am J Med. 1960;29:193-216), there have been only 3 descriptions of children with the disorder. Familial cases have not been reported. Brain involvement has only been described for adults and with minimal radiologic findings. We report here an unusual case of an 8-year-old boy with multiple episodes of SCLS since the age of 5 months and an exceptional presentation characterized by substantial neurologic involvement with cerebellar edema and autonomic dysfunction. The patient's family history was remarkable for 8 more relatives with the disorder, including his sister who died during a similar episode in infancy and a first-degree cousin of his father who was diagnosed as suffering from recurrent episodes of SCLS. Our patient is, to our knowledge, the first patient with SCLS with a family history of the disorder. Additional genetic studies in the extended family might shed light on the pathogenesis of this rare disorder.
Long-term follow-up of postmenopausal breast cancer patients following discontinuation of tamoxifen therapy. - Maturitas
There is a need to evaluate the extent of endometrial pathologies that might develop in postmenopausal breast cancer patients following discontinuation of tamoxifen (TAM) therapy.The medical records of 153 postmenopausal breast cancer patients who remained untreated following discontinuation of tamoxifen therapy were evaluated for various clinical features, for endometrial thickness measurements, as detected by transvaginal ultrasonography, and for various endometrial pathologies detected. The last endometrial thickness measurement performed before discontinuation of tamoxifen was compared with endometrial thickness measured following discontinuation of tamoxifen.Patients were followed for 37.5+/-31.3 months. There was a gradual and significant decrement of endometrial thickness measured at the last ultrasonographic study performed before cessation of tamoxifen, compared to that observed in all four ultrasonographic studies performed following discontinuation of tamoxifen (P=0.001). Endometrial thickness gradually and significantly decreased in correlation with the time intervals of the four ultrasonographic studies performed following discontinuation of tamoxifen (P=0.001). Overall, 40 hysteroscopies were performed in 38 (24.8%) patients. No tissue was obtained in 18 (11.8%) patients. Overall endometrial pathologies were diagnosed in 22 (14.4%) patients. Benign endometrial polyps were the most frequent endometrial pathology recovered: 17 (11.1%) patients. No endometrial malignancy was diagnosed. The rate of endometrial pathologies considerably decreased with the extension of time following discontinuation of tamoxifen therapy.Long-term follow-up of postmenopausal breast cancer patients who remained untreated following discontinuation of TAM therapy did not reveal any malignant endometrial pathology. Only few benign endometrial pathologies were diagnosed, which became fewer in time.
Aromatase inhibitors and the endometrium. - Maturitas
To investigate the potential impact of aromatase inhibitors, given after stopping tamoxifen treatment, on the endometrium of postmenopausal breast cancer patients.Review of all available literature of studies on aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients previously treated with tamoxifen.(1) Endometrial thickness was found to be significantly lower in patients switched from tamoxifen treatment to aromatase inhibitor therapy, compared to those who continued tamoxifen treatment. This significant difference between the 2 groups was maintained throughout the entire treatment. (2) Vaginal bleeding was significantly more common in patients who continued tamoxifen therapy as compared to those who switched to aromatase inhibitors. (3) Replacement of tamoxifen treatment by aromatase inhibitors in postmenopausal breast cancer patients resulted in the appearance of only few, benign endometrial pathologies. The different endometrial pathologies were more common in patients who continued tamoxifen therapy, compared to patients who switched to aromatase inhibitors. (4) Endometrial cancer was recovered in significantly more patients who continued tamoxifen therapy as compared to those switched to aromatase inhibitors. However, some studies showed no significant statistical differences in the frequency of endometrial cancer diagnosed in the tamoxifen group as compared to the aromatase inhibitor group.These findings may hint on the possibility that aromatase inhibitors may provide a potential protective effect on the endometrium in patients previously treated with tamoxifen.
Mode of ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass does not affect immediate postbypass oxygenation in pediatric cardiac patients. - Journal of clinical anesthesia
To investigate the impact of different modes of ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on immediate postbypass oxygenation in pediatric cardiac surgery.Prospective, randomized clinical trial.University hospital.50 pediatric patients (18 girls, 32 boys), aged 4 months to 15 years, undergoing elective repair of congenital heart disease.Patients were randomized to receive one of 5 modes of ventilation during bypass. Groups 1 and 2 received high-frequency/low-volume ventilation with 100% (group 1) or 21% oxygen (group 2). Groups 3 and 4 received continuous positive airway pressure of 5 cm H(2)O with 100% (group 3) or 21% oxygen (group 4); and in group 5, each patient's airway was disconnected from the ventilator (passive deflation).Blood gas analysis and spirometry data were recorded 5 minutes before chest opening, 5 minutes before inducing bypass, 5 minutes after weaning from bypass, and 5 minutes after chest closure.There were no differences in Pao(2) values among the 5 groups studied and at the different time points. Lung compliance was higher 5 minutes before bypass in group 1 versus group 5 (34 +/- 13 mL/cm H(2)O vs 20 +/- 9 mL/cm H(2)O; P = 0.048).Mode of ventilation during CPB did not affect immediate postbypass oxygenation.

Map & Directions

28 Throckmorton Lane Old Bridge, NJ 08857
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