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Dr. Simrit  Parmar  Md image

Dr. Simrit Parmar Md

1515 Holcombe Blvd
Houston TX 77030
713 926-6161
Medical School: Other - 1998
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: M2002
NPI: 1629047113
Taxonomy Codes:
207RH0003X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Simrit Parmar is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$441.02 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$107.56
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$283.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$100.42
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$214.67 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$76.49

HCPCS Code Definitions

99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1710149752
Hematology
1,977
1023118015
Hematology/Oncology
1,206
1952483380
Internal Medicine
684
1245243948
Internal Medicine
602
1912930231
Pathology
539
1649364886
Hematology/Oncology
522
1740236934
Infectious Disease
502
1639224918
Pathology
479
1184653875
Pathology
407
1013910108
Pathology
403
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Parmar has made to other doctors

Publications

Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Dialysis-Dependent Myeloma Patients. - Clinical lymphoma, myeloma & leukemia
We retrospectively analyzed our transplant database from July 2000 to June 2012 to identify myeloma patients who received autologous stem cell transplantation while dialysis-dependent.2091 patients underwent autologous high-dose therapy during this period. Twenty-four patients were dialysis-dependent.The 100-day and the 6, and 12-month treatment-related mortality was 0%. Overall response rate was 92%. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 1.9 years and 3.8 years, respectively. A multivariate analysis was not performed because of the small sample size. Only 3 patients became dialysis-independent after transplantation. Cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, infectious, neurologic, and pulmonary "all grade" toxicities were all higher in the melphalan 200 group versus < 200 group, however, none of them were statistically significant.Because of a lack of clear survival benefit with higher-dose melphalan and potential higher toxicity in this group, it is reasonable to use lower-dose melphalan in dialysis-dependent myeloma patients.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Outcome of Patients with Immunoglobulin Light-Chain Amyloidosis with Lung, Liver, Gastrointestinal, Neurologic, and Soft Tissue Involvement after Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. - Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
There is limited information on the outcome when organs other than heart or kidneys are involved by immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis (AL). We report the outcome of 53 patients with AL with gastrointestinal (GI), peripheral nerve (PN), liver, lung, or soft-tissue involvement, who underwent high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT) at our institution between 1997 and 2013. The median age at auto-HCT was 56 years (range, 35 to 74). One, 2, 3, or 4 organs were involved in 43%, 22%, 28%, and 4% of patients, respectively. Concurrent cardiac, renal, or both were involved in 24 (45%) patients. Forty-six patients received induction therapy before auto-HCT. The 100-day and 1-year treatment-related mortality (TRM) were 3.8% (n = 2) and 7.5% (n = 4), respectively. Forty-one (80%) patients achieved a hematologic response. Organ response at 1 year after auto-HCT was seen in 23 (57%) of the 40 evaluable patients. With a median follow-up of 24 months, the median progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) were 36 and 73 months, respectively. Auto-HCT was associated with a low TRM, durable organ responses, and a median OS of > 6 years in selected patients with AL and GI, PN, liver, lung, or soft-tissue involvement.Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Enforced fucosylation of cord blood hematopoietic cells accelerates neutrophil and platelet engraftment after transplantation. - Blood
Delayed engraftment is a major limitation of cord blood transplantation (CBT), due in part to a defect in the cord blood (CB) cells' ability to home to the bone marrow. Because this defect appears related to low levels of fucosylation of cell surface molecules that are responsible for binding to P- and E-selectins constitutively expressed by the marrow microvasculature, and thus for marrow homing, we conducted a first-in-humans clinical trial to correct this deficiency. Patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies received myeloablative therapy followed by transplantation with 2 CB units, one of which was treated ex vivo for 30 minutes with the enzyme fucosyltransferase-VI and guanosine diphosphate fucose to enhance the interaction of CD34(+) stem and early progenitor cells with microvessels. The results of enforced fucosylation for 22 patients enrolled in the trial were then compared with those for 31 historical controls who had undergone double unmanipulated CBT. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was 17 days (range, 12-34 days) compared with 26 days (range, 11-48 days) for controls (P = .0023). Platelet engraftment was also improved: median was 35 days (range, 18-100 days) compared with 45 days (range, 27-120 days) for controls (P = .0520). These findings support ex vivo fucosylation of multipotent CD34(+) CB cells as a clinically feasible means to improve engraftment efficiency in the double CBT setting. The trial is registered to www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01471067.© 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.
General and Virus-Specific Immune Cell Reconstitution after Double Cord Blood Transplantation. - Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Cord blood transplantation (CBT) is curative for many patients with hematologic malignancies but is associated with delayed immune recovery and an increased risk of viral infections compared with HLA-matched bone marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation. In this study we evaluated the significance of lymphocyte recovery in 125 consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent double-unit CBT (DUCBT) with an antithymocyte globulin-containing regimen at our institution. A subset of 65 patients was prospectively evaluated for recovery of T, natural killer (NK), and B cells, and in 46 patients we also examined viral-specific T cell recovery against adenovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, BK virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza antigen. Our results indicate that in recipients of DUCBT, the day 30 absolute lymphocyte count is highly predictive of nonrelapse mortality and overall survival. Immune recovery post-DUCBT was characterized by prolonged CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphopenia associated with preferential expansion of B and NK cells. We also observed profound delays in quantitative and functional recovery of viral-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses for the first year post-CBT. Taken together, our data support efforts aimed at optimizing viral-specific T cell recovery to improve outcomes post-CBT.Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Ex vivo fucosylation of third-party human regulatory T cells enhances anti-graft-versus-host disease potency in vivo. - Blood
Adoptive therapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) would benefit from a strategy to improve homing to the sites of inflammation. We hypothesized that adding fucose to human Tregs, forming the Sialyl Lewis X moiety on P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, would improve their trafficking pattern. The selectin pathway recruiter, α-1,3-fucosyltransferase-VI enzyme, significantly increased Treg surface fucosylation (66% vs 8%). In a xenogenic GVHD mouse model, fucosylated Tregs showed prolonged periods of in vivo persistence. When given at a lower dose compared with the untreated Tregs, the murine recipients of fucosylated Tregs maintained weight, had ameliorated clinical GVHD, and improved survival (70% vs 30%; P < .0001). These preclinical data indicate that fucosylated human Tregs is an effective strategy for prevention of GVHD and, as such, warrants consideration for future clinical trials.© 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.
Regulatory B cells are enriched within the IgM memory and transitional subsets in healthy donors but are deficient in chronic GVHD. - Blood
A subset of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in mice negatively regulate T-cell immune responses through the secretion of regulatory cytokines such as IL-10 and direct cell-cell contact and have been linked to experimental models of autoimmunity, inflammation, and cancer. However, the regulatory function of Bregs in human disease is much less clear. Here we demonstrate that B cells with immunoregulatory properties are enriched within both the CD19(+)IgM(+)CD27(+) memory and CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) transitional B-cell subsets in healthy human donors. Both subsets suppressed the proliferation and interferon-γ production of CD3/CD28-stimulated autologous CD4(+) T cells in a dose-dependent manner, and both relied on IL-10 secretion as well as cell-cell contact, likely mediated through CD80 and CD86, to support their full suppressive function. Moreover, after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, Bregs from patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) were less frequent and less likely to produce IL-10 than were Bregs from healthy donors and patients without cGVHD. These findings suggest that Bregs may be involved in the pathogenesis of cGVHD and support future investigation of regulatory B cell-based therapy in the treatment of this disease.© 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.
Allogeneic transplantation as anticancer immunotherapy. - Current opinion in immunology
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloSCT) utilizes HLA-matched donor bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell grafts to reconstitute haematopoiesis and immunity in patients with bone marrow failure or hematological malignancies. It is now clear that much of the anti-cancer effect of AlloSCT is due to the ability of engrafting donor derived lymphocyte populations to eradicate residual malignant clones, through a phenomenon known as the graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. Recognition of the importance of GVT in the long-term control of cancer has allowed substantial reductions in the pre-transplant conditioning intensity, leading to the development of reduced-intensity or even non-myeloablative transplant regimens in some patient groups. These reduced intensity regimens still allow donor cell engraftment and GVT, whilst reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with traditional myeloablative conditioning. Through clinical observations and experimental models of AlloSCT substantial insights have been provided into the mechanisms of immunological control of malignancy even outside the setting of AlloSCT, providing an opportunity to duplicate these anti-cancer mechanisms via non-allogeneic immunotherapies.Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Third-party umbilical cord blood-derived regulatory T cells prevent xenogenic graft-versus-host disease. - Cytotherapy
Naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg) are emerging as a promising approach for prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), which remains an obstacle to the successful outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, Treg only constitute 1-5% of total nucleated cells in cord blood (CB) (<3 × 10⁶ cells), and therefore novel methods of Treg expansion to generate clinically relevant numbers are needed.Several methodologies are currently being used for ex vivo Treg expansion. We report a new approach to expand Treg from CB and demonstrate their efficacy in vitro by blunting allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions and in vivo by preventing GvHD through the use of a xenogenic GvHD mouse model.With the use of magnetic cell sorting, naturally occurring Treg were isolated from CB by the positive selection of CD25⁺ cells. These were expanded to clinically relevant numbers by use of CD3/28 co-expressing Dynabeads and interleukin (IL)-2. Ex vivo-expanded Treg were CD4⁺25⁺ FOXP3⁺127(lo) and expressed a polyclonal T-cell receptor, Vβ repertoire. When compared with conventional T-lymphocytes (CD4⁺25⁻ cells), Treg consistently showed demethylation of the FOXP3 TSDR promoter region and suppression of allogeneic proliferation responses in vitro.In our NOD-SCID IL-2Rγ(null) xenogeneic model of GvHD, prophylactic injection of third-party, CB-derived, ex vivo-expanded Treg led to the prevention of GvHD that translated into improved GvHD score, decreased circulating inflammatory cytokines and significantly superior overall survival. This model of xenogenic GvHD can be used to study the mechanism of action of CB Treg as well as other therapeutic interventions.Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Antigen presenting cell-mediated expansion of human umbilical cord blood yields log-scale expansion of natural killer cells with anti-myeloma activity. - PloS one
Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of anti-tumor immunity and are active against several hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Umbilical cord blood (CB) is a promising source of allogeneic NK cells but large scale ex vivo expansion is required for generation of clinically relevant CB-derived NK (CB-NK) cell doses. Here we describe a novel strategy for expanding NK cells from cryopreserved CB units using artificial antigen presenting feeder cells (aAPC) in a gas permeable culture system. After 14 days, mean fold expansion of CB-NK cells was 1848-fold from fresh and 2389-fold from cryopreserved CB with >95% purity for NK cells (CD56(+)/CD3(-)) and less than 1% CD3(+) cells. Though surface expression of some cytotoxicity receptors was decreased, aAPC-expanded CB-NK cells exhibited a phenotype similar to CB-NK cells expanded with IL-2 alone with respect to various inhibitory receptors, NKG2C and CD94 and maintained strong expression of transcription factors Eomesodermin and T-bet. Furthermore, CB-NK cells formed functional immune synapses with and demonstrated cytotoxicity against various MM targets. Finally, aAPC-expanded CB-NK cells showed significant in vivo activity against MM in a xenogenic mouse model. Our findings introduce a clinically applicable strategy for the generation of highly functional CB-NK cells which can be used to eradicate MM.
Fucosylation with fucosyltransferase VI or fucosyltransferase VII improves cord blood engraftment. - Cytotherapy
Advantages associated with the use of cord blood (CB) transplantation include the availability of cryopreserved units, ethnic diversity and lower incidence of graft-versus-host disease compared with bone marrow or mobilized peripheral blood. However, poor engraftment remains a major obstacle. We and others have found that ex vivo fucosylation can enhance engraftment in murine models, and now ex vivo treatment of CB with fucosyltransferase (FT) VI before transplantation is under clinical evaluation (NCT01471067). However, FTVII appears to be more relevant to hematopoietic cells and may alter acceptor substrate diversity. The present study compared the ability of FTVI and FTVII to improve the rapidity, magnitude, multi-lineage and multi-tissue engraftment of human CB hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in vivo.CD34-selected CB HSPCs were treated with recombinant FTVI, FTVII or mock control and then injected into immunodeficient mice and monitored for multi-lineage and multi-tissue engraftment.Both FTVI and FTVII fucosylated CB CD34⁺ cells in vitro, and both led to enhanced rates and magnitudes of engraftment compared with untreated CB CD34⁺ cells in vivo. Engraftment after treatment with either FT was robust at multiple time points and in multiple tissues with similar multi-lineage potential. In contrast, only FTVII was able to fucosylate T and B lymphocytes.Although FTVI and FTVII were found to be similarly able to fucosylate and enhance the engraftment of CB CD34⁺ cells, differences in their ability to fucosylate lymphocytes may modulate graft-versus-tumor or graft-versus-host effects and may allow further optimization of CB transplantation.Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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1515 Holcombe Blvd Houston, TX 77030
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