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Dr. Sanjay  Reddy  Md image

Dr. Sanjay Reddy Md

623 Maitland Ave Ste 2200
Altamonte Springs FL 32701
407 308-8661
Medical School: University Of Miami School Of Medicine - 1998
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: ME90805
NPI: 1619954393
Taxonomy Codes:
207RG0100X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Sanjay Reddy is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:45385 Description:Lesion removal colonoscopy Average Price:$1,095.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$321.25
HCPCS Code:45380 Description:Colonoscopy and biopsy Average Price:$805.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$213.92
HCPCS Code:G0105 Description:Colorectal scrn; hi risk ind Average Price:$750.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$226.98
HCPCS Code:45378 Description:Diagnostic colonoscopy Average Price:$750.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$226.98
HCPCS Code:G0121 Description:Colon ca scrn not hi rsk ind Average Price:$750.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$227.08
HCPCS Code:43239 Description:Upper gi endoscopy biopsy Average Price:$625.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$157.65
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$270.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$197.11
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$205.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$161.11
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$125.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$103.41
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$120.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$100.43
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$80.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.94

HCPCS Code Definitions

43239
Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, flexible, transoral; with biopsy, single or multiple
G0121
Colorectal cancer screening; colonoscopy on individual not meeting criteria for high risk
G0105
Colorectal cancer screening; colonoscopy on individual at high risk
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
45385
Colonoscopy, flexible, proximal to splenic flexure; with removal of tumor(s), polyp(s), or other lesion(s) by snare technique
45380
Colonoscopy, flexible, proximal to splenic flexure; with biopsy, single or multiple
45378
Colonoscopy, flexible, proximal to splenic flexure; diagnostic, with or without collection of specimen(s) by brushing or washing, with or without colon decompression (separate procedure)
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1134123078
Internal Medicine
586
1568459006
Hematology/Oncology
273
1770576845
Nephrology
225
1528082468
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
193
1053361808
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
145
1245250174
Family Practice
141
1306807052
Internal Medicine
123
1134127830
Diagnostic Radiology
121
1326074188
Diagnostic Radiology
118
1124097266
Infectious Disease
89
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Reddy has made to other doctors

Publications

Promoting endochondral bone repair using human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. - Tissue engineering. Part A
Current tissue engineering strategies to heal critical-size bone defects through direct bone formation are limited by incomplete integration of grafts with host bone and incomplete graft vascularization. An alternative strategy for bone regeneration is the use of cartilage grafts that form bone through endochondral ossification. Endochondral cartilages stimulate angiogenesis and are remodeled into bone, but are found in very small quantities in growth plates and healing fractures. We sought to develop engineered endochondral cartilage grafts using osteoarthritic (OA) articular chondrocytes as a cell source. Such chondrocytes often undergo hypertrophy, which is a characteristic of endochondral cartilages.We compared the ability of unmodified human OA cartilage and cartilage grafts formed in vitro from human OA chondrocytes to undergo endochondral ossification in mice. Scaffold-free engineered cartilage grafts were generated by pelleting chondrocytes, followed by culture with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenetic protein 4. Samples derived from either primary or passaged chondrocytes were implanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. Grafts derived from passaged chondrocytes from three patients were implanted into critical-size tibial defects in mice. Bone formation was assessed with histology after four weeks of implantation. The composition of tibial repair tissue was quantified with histomorphometry.Engineered cartilage grafts generated from passaged OA chondrocytes underwent endochondral ossification after implantation either subcutaneously or in bone. Cartilage grafts integrated with host bone at 15 out of 16 junctions. Grafts variably remodeled into woven bone, with the proportion of bony repair tissue in tibial defects ranging from 22% to 85% (average 48%). Bony repair tissue bridged the tibial defects in half of the animals. In contrast, unmodified OA cartilage and engineered grafts formed from primary chondrocytes did not undergo endochondral ossification in vivo.Human OA chondrocytes can adopt an endochondral phenotype after passaging and TGF-β superfamily treatment. Engineered endochondral cartilage grafts can integrate with host bone, undergo ossification, and heal critical-size long-bone defects in a mouse model. However, additional methods to further enhance ossification of these grafts are required prior to the clinical translation of this approach.
Improving Patient-Centered Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Prior Use and Interest in Complementary and Integrative Health Approaches Among Hospitalized Oncology Patients. - Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.)
To describe cancer inpatients' prior-year use of complementary and integrative health (CIH) therapies and interest in receiving CIH therapies while in the hospital.Observational, cross-sectional survey of prior-year use of 12 different CIH approaches and interest in receiving any of 7 CIH services in the hospital.Surgical oncology ward of an academic medical center.166 hospitalized oncology patients, with an average age of 54 years.The most commonly used CIH approach was vitamins/nutritional supplements (67%), followed by use of a special diet (42%) and manual therapies (39%). More than 40% of patients expressed interest in each of the therapies if it was offered during their hospital stay, and 95% of patients were interested in at least one. More than 75% expressed interest in nutritional counseling and in massage. CIH use and interest varied somewhat by demographic and clinical characteristics.Rates of CIH use among patients with cancer were high, as were their preferences to have these services available in the inpatient setting. Hospitals have the opportunity to provide patient-centered care by developing capacity to provide inpatient CIH services.
A randomized placebo-controlled trial of the efficacy of denosumab in Indian postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. - Indian journal of endocrinology and metabolism
Osteoporosis is a serious condition affecting up to 50% of Indian postmenopausal women. Denosumab reduces bone resorption by targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of denosumab in Indian postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.In this double-blind, multicenter, phase 3 study, 250 Indian postmenopausal women aged 55 to 75 years (T-score <-2.5 and >-4.0 at the lumbar spine or total hip; serum 25(OH) D levels ≥20 ng/mL) were randomized to receive one subcutaneous dose of denosumab 60 mg or placebo. All subjects received oral calcium ≥1000 mg and vitamin D3 ≥ 400 IU daily. The primary end point was mean percent change in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine from baseline to Month 6. Secondary end points included mean percent change from baseline in BMD at total hip, femoral neck, and trochanter at Month 6 and median percent change from baseline in bone turnover markers at Months 1, 3, and 6.Total 225 subjects (denosumab = 111, placebo = 114) completed the six-month study. Baseline demographics were similar between groups. A 3.1% (95% confidence interval, 1.9%, 4.2%) increase favoring denosumab versus placebo was seen for the primary end point (P < 0.0001). Denosumab demonstrated a significant treatment benefit over placebo for the secondary end points. There were no fractures or withdrawals due to adverse events.Consistent with results from studies conducted in other parts of the world, denosumab was well tolerated and effective in increasing BMD and decreasing bone turnover markers over a six-month period in Indian postmenopausal women.
Identification and in vitro characterization of a Marek's disease virus-encoded Ribonucleotide reductase. - Avian diseases
Marek's disease virus (MDV) encodes a ribonucleotide reductase (RR), a key regulatory enzyme in the DNA synthesis pathway. The gene coding for the RR of MDV is located in the unique long (UL) region of the genome. The large subunit is encoded by UL39 (RR1) and is predicted to comprise 860 amino acids whereas the small subunit encoded by UL40 (RR2) is predicted to be 343 amino acids long. Immunoprecipitation analysis of MDV-1 (GA strain)-infected cells with T81, a monoclonal antibody specific for RR of MDV, identified two major proteins of 90,000 and 40,000 daltons, corresponding to RR1 and RR2, respectively. In addition, RR was abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of cells infected with 51 strains of MDV belonging to MDV serotypes 1, 2, and 3 as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. Northern blot analysis of RNA extracted from MDV-infected cells showed a major band of around 4.4 kb in size corresponding to the RR1 and RR2 transcripts. In vivo, RR was abundantly expressed in lymphoid organs and feather follicle epithelium of MDV-infected chickens during early cytolytic infection, as determined by immunohistochemistry. There was, however, no expression of RR in MDV-induced tumors in lymphoid organs. The abundant expression of RR in MDV-infected chicken may suggest an important role of RR in the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides for MDV DNA synthesis.
Forecasting neutron star temperatures: predictability and variability. - Physical review letters
It is now possible to model thermal relaxation of neutron stars after bouts of accretion during which the star is heated out of equilibrium by nuclear reactions in its crust. Major uncertainties in these models can be encapsulated in modest variations of a handful of control parameters that change the fiducial crustal thermal conductivity, specific heat, and heating rates. Observations of thermal relaxation constrain these parameters and allow us to predict longer term variability in terms of the neutron star core temperature. We demonstrate this explicitly by modeling ongoing thermal relaxation in the neutron star XTE J1701-462. Its future cooling, over the next 5 to 30 years, is strongly constrained and depends mostly on its core temperature, uncertainties in crust physics having essentially been pinned down by fitting to the first three years of observations.
Properties of a meq-deleted rmd5 Marek's disease vaccine: protection against virulent MDV challenge and induction of lymphoid organ atrophy are simultaneously attenuated by serial passage in vitro. - Avian diseases
We have previously shown that deletion of the meq gene from the genome of Cosmid-cloned rMd5 strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV-1) resulted in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of the virus. The rMd5deltaMeq (Meq null) virus has been shown to be an excellent vaccine in maternal antibody positive (MAb+) chickens challenged with a very virulent plus (vv+) strain of MDV, 648A. The only drawback was that it retained its ability to induce bursa and thymus atrophy (BTA) like that of the parental rMd5 in maternal antibody negative (MAb-) chickens. We recently reported that the attenuated Meq null virus did not induce BTA at the 40th cell culture passage onward. Its protective ability against challenge with vv+ MDV, strain 686 was similar to the original virus at the 19th passage in MAb- chickens. In this study, we compared the same series of attenuated meq null viruses in commercial chickens. In commercial chickens with MAb, the attenuated viruses quickly lost protection with increasing cell culture attenuation. These data suggest that although attenuation of these meq null viruses eliminated BTA, it had no influence on their protective efficacy in MAb- chickens. However, in commercial chickens (MAb+), the best protection was provided by the original 19th passage; the attenuated 40th passage was as good as one of the currently commercial CVI988/Rispens vaccine, and it did not induce BTA. Therefore, protection against virulent MDV challenge and induction of lymphoid organ atrophy are simultaneously attenuated by serial passage in vitro.
Cloning of a very virulent plus, 686 strain of Marek's disease virus as a bacterial artificial chromosome. - Avian diseases
Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors were first developed to facilitate propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments. This technology was later used to clone full-length genomes of large DNA viruses to study viral gene function. Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly oncogenic herpesvirus that causes rapid induction of T-cell lymphomas in chickens. Based on the virus's ability to cause disease in vaccinated chickens, MDV strains are classified into pathotypes, with the most virulent strains belonging to the very virulent plus (vv+) pathotype. Here we report the construction of BAC clones of 686 (686-BAC), a vv+ strain of MDV. Transfection of DNA isolated from two independent clones into duck embryo fibroblasts resulted in recovery of infectious virus. Pathogenesis studies showed that the BAC-derived 686 viruses were more virulent than Md5, a vv strain of MDV. With the use of a two-step red-mediated mutagenesis process, both copies of viral interleukin 8 (vIL-8) were deleted from the MDV genome, showing that 686-BACs were amenable to mutagenesis techniques. The generation of BAC clones from a vv+ strain of MDV is a significant step toward understanding molecular basis of MDV pathogenesis.
Deletion of Marek's disease virus large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase impairs virus growth in vitro and in vivo. - Avian diseases
Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly cell-associated lymphotropic alphaherpesvirus, is the causative agent of a neoplastic disease in domestic chickens called Marek's disease (MD). In the unique long (UL) region of the MDV genome, open reading frames UL39 and UL40 encode the large and small subunits of the ribonucleotide reductase (RR) enzyme, named RR1 and RR2, respectively. MDV RR is distinguishable from that present in chicken and duck cells by monoclonal antibody T81. Using recombinant DNA technology we have generated a mutant MDV (Md5deltaRR1) in which RR1 was deleted. PCR amplification of the RR gene in Md5deltaRR1-infected duck embryo fibroblasts (DEF) confirmed the deletion of the 2.4 kb RR1 gene with a resultant amplicon of a 640-bp fragment. Restriction enzyme digests with SalI confirmed a UL39 deletion and the absence of gross rearrangement. The biologic characteristics of Md5deltaRR1 virus were studied in vitro and in vivo. The Md5deltaRR1 replicated in DEF, but significantly slower than parental Md5-BAC, suggesting that RR is important but not essential for replication in fibroblasts. In vivo studies, however, showed that the RR1 deletion virus was impaired for its ability to replicate in chickens. Inoculation of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens with Md5deltaRR1 showed the mutant virus is nonpathogenic and does not induce MD in birds. A revertant virus, Md5deltaRR1/R, was generated with the restored phenotype of the parental Md5-BAC in vivo, indicating that RR is essential for replication of the virus in chickens. Protection studies in SPF chickens indicated that the Md5deltaRR1 virus is not a candidate vaccine against MD.
Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into the genome of CVI988 strain of Marek's disease virus results in enhanced growth and protection. - Avian diseases
Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by serotype 1 MD virus (MDV). Vaccination of commercial poultry has drastically reduced losses from MD, and the poultry industry cannot be sustained without the use of vaccines. Retrovirus insertion into herpesvirus genomes is an efficient process that alters the biological properties of herpesviruses. RM1, a virus derived from the virulent JM strain of MDV, by insertion of the reticuloendotheliosis (REV) long terminal repeat (LTR), was attenuated for oncogenicity but retains properties of the parental virus, such as lymphoid organ atrophy. Here we show that insertion of the REV LTR into the genome of vaccine strain CVI988 resulted in a virus (CVRM) that replicated to higher levels than parental CVI988 in cell culture and that remained apathogenic for chickens. In addition, CVRM showed protection indices similar or superior to those afforded by CVI988 virus in laboratory and field protection trials, indicating that it could be developed as a safe and efficacious vaccine to protect against very virulent plus MDV.
Avian influenza virus surveillance in hunter-harvested waterfowl, Texas coast, September 2009-January 2010. - Avian diseases
Wild waterfowl are considered the natural reservoir of type A influenza viruses, and the migratory nature of many waterfowl species presents a possible vehicle for global dissemination of these infectious agents. In order to fully understand the ecology of influenza viruses, multiyear surveillance efforts are critical, particularly in understudied areas, such as waterfowl wintering areas. Herein we report results obtained during the fifth year ofa 5-yr avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance project conducted on waterfowl wintering grounds of the Texas Coast. During year 5, the 2009-2010 hunting season (September, November-January), 655 cloacal swabs were collected from hunter-harvested waterfowl and screened for AIV by real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) followed by virus isolation on all positive samples. Molecular methods were used for subtyping all AIV isolates. Sixty-five (9.5%) samples were positive for AIV by rRT-PCR, and 24 (3.7%) AIVs were isolated. Eight different hemagglutinin (H3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 11) and seven different neuraminidase (N1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 9) subtypes were identified. This was the first year H8 and H9 were isolated throughout the 5-yr survey. Our results support the fact that continued multiyear surveillance of natural reservoirs, particularly in understudied areas, is needed in order to better understand the ecology of AIVs in nature.

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623 Maitland Ave Ste 2200 Altamonte Springs, FL 32701
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