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Dr. Barney  Beaver  Do image

Dr. Barney Beaver Do

4630 Hwy 17 Bypass
Murrells Inlet SC 29576
843 571-1299
Medical School: Kirksville College Of Osteopathic Medicine - 1979
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #:
NPI: 1609870450
Taxonomy Codes:
207RC0000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Barney Beaver is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:93458 Description:L hrt artery/ventricle angio Average Price:$761.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$232.39
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$52.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$17.17
HCPCS Code:93282 Description:Icd device prog eval 1 sngl Average Price:$89.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$58.57
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$173.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$147.99
HCPCS Code:93280 Description:Pm device progr eval dual Average Price:$79.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$54.65
HCPCS Code:93296 Description:Pm/icd remote tech serv Average Price:$43.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.86
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$110.36 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$96.30
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$77.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$64.93
HCPCS Code:93010 Description:Electrocardiogram report Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.04
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$77.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$65.94

HCPCS Code Definitions

93280
Programming device evaluation (in person) with iterative adjustment of the implantable device to test the function of the device and select optimal permanent programmed values with analysis, review and report by a physician or other qualified health care professional; dual lead pacemaker system
93282
Programming device evaluation (in person) with iterative adjustment of the implantable device to test the function of the device and select optimal permanent programmed values with analysis, review and report by a physician or other qualified health care professional; single lead implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
93296
Interrogation device evaluation(s) (remote), up to 90 days; single, dual, or multiple lead pacemaker system or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system, remote data acquisition(s), receipt of transmissions and technician review, technical support and distribution of results
93010
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; interpretation and report only
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
93458
Catheter placement in coronary artery(s) for coronary angiography, including intraprocedural injection(s) for coronary angiography, imaging supervision and interpretation; with left heart catheterization including intraprocedural injection(s) for left ventriculography, when performed
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1740277508
Family Practice
1,766
1568429223
Pulmonary Disease
690
1831103845
Diagnostic Radiology
669
1790787406
Emergency Medicine
497
1891770178
Infectious Disease
483
1114985983
Internal Medicine
450
1760425532
Internal Medicine
450
1265423453
Urology
410
1295765402
Urology
357
1083675060
Internal Medicine
347
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Beaver has made to other doctors

Publications

Modeling human retinal development with patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells reveals multiple roles for visual system homeobox 2. - Stem cells (Dayton, Ohio)
Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been shown to differentiate along the retinal lineage in a manner that mimics normal mammalian development. Under certain culture conditions, hiPSCs form optic vesicle-like structures (OVs), which contain proliferating progenitors capable of yielding all neural retina (NR) cell types over time. Such observations imply conserved roles for regulators of retinogenesis in hiPSC-derived cultures and the developing embryo. However, whether and to what extent this assumption holds true has remained largely uninvestigated. We examined the role of a key NR transcription factor, visual system homeobox 2 (VSX2), using hiPSCs derived from a patient with microphthalmia caused by an R200Q mutation in the VSX2 homeodomain region. No differences were noted between (R200Q)VSX2 and sibling control hiPSCs prior to OV generation. Thereafter, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs displayed a significant growth deficit compared to control hiPSC-OVs, as well as increased production of retinal pigmented epithelium at the expense of NR cell derivatives. Furthermore, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs failed to produce bipolar cells, a distinctive feature previously observed in Vsx2 mutant mice. (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs also demonstrated delayed photoreceptor maturation, which could be overcome via exogenous expression of wild-type VSX2 at early stages of retinal differentiation. Finally, RNAseq analysis on isolated hiPSC-OVs implicated key transcription factors and extracellular signaling pathways as potential downstream effectors of VSX2-mediated gene regulation. Our results establish hiPSC-OVs as versatile model systems to study retinal development at stages not previously accessible in humans and support the bona fide nature of hiPSC-OV-derived retinal progeny.© 2014 AlphaMed Press.
Aquaporin-2 levels in vitro and in vivo are regulated by VACM-1, a cul 5 gene. - Cellular physiology and biochemistry : international journal of experimental cellular physiology, biochemistry, and pharmacology
In the renal collecting duct, vasopressin regulates water permeability by a process that involves stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, cAMP production and subsequent translocation of water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) into the apical plasma membrane. We have previously shown that in cos 1 cells in vitro, both adenylyl cyclase activity and cAMP production can be regulated by VACM-1, a cul 5 gene that forms complexes involved in protein ubiquitination and subsequent degradation.To extend these observations further, the effects of changes in hydration state on the expression of VACM-1 at the mRNA and the protein level were examined in rats deprived of water (WD) for 24 hrs.In the kidney of WD rats Western blot analyses of kidney tissue showed that the decrease in VACM-1 protein concentration was correlated with the increase in the AQP2 protein level. The immunostaining data suggested that VACM-1/cul5 may be decreased in renal collecting duct but increases in the vasculature of the inner medullary region in response to WD. To determine the possible consequences of the WD dependent decrease in VACM-1/cul5, we next examined the effects of VACM-1 expression on AQP2 protein in vitro. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot analyses data indicate that VACM-1/cul5 expression in MDCK line stably expressing AQP2 gene and in cos 1 cells co-transfected with the AQP2 and VACM-1/cul5 cDNAs decreased AQP2 protein concentration when compared to the vector transfected control groups.In summary, our data demonstrate that VACM-1 is involved in the regulation of AQP2 protein concentration and may play a role in regulating water balance.Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Maintenance of acinar cell organization is critical to preventing Kras-induced acinar-ductal metaplasia. - Oncogene
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers owing to a number of characteristics including difficulty in establishing early diagnosis and the absence of effective therapeutic regimens. A large number of genetic alterations have been ascribed to PDAC with mutations in the KRAS2 proto-oncogene thought to be an early event in the progression of disease. Recent lineage-tracing studies have shown that acinar cells expressing mutant Kras(G12D) are induced to transdifferentiate, generating duct-like cells through a process known as acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM). ADM lesions then convert to precancerous pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) that progresses to PDAC over time. Thus, understanding the earliest events involved in ADM/PanIN formation would provide much needed information on the molecular pathways that are instrumental in initiating this disease. As studying the transition of acinar cells to metaplastic ductal cells in vivo is complicated by analysis of the entire organ, an in vitro three dimensional (3D) culture system was used to model ADM outside the animal. Kras(G12D)-expressing acinar cells rapidly underwent ADM in 3D culture, forming ductal cysts that silenced acinar genes and activated duct genes, characteristics associated with in vivo ADM/PanIN lesions. Analysis of downstream KRAS signaling events established a critical importance for the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in ADM induction. In addition, forced expression of the acinar-restricted transcription factor Mist1, which is critical to acinar cell organization, significantly attenuated Kras(G12D)-induced ADM/PanIN formation. These results suggest that maintaining MIST1 activity in Kras(G12D)-expressing acinar cells can partially mitigate the transformation activity of oncogenic KRAS. Future therapeutics that target both the MAPK pathway and Mist1 transcriptional networks may show promising efficacy in combating this deadly disease.
VACM-1/cul5 expression in vascular tissue in vivo is induced by water deprivation and its expression in vitro regulates aquaporin-1 concentrations. - Cell and tissue research
VACM-1, a cul5 gene product, when overexpressed in vitro, has an antiproliferative effect. In vivo, VACM-1/cul5 is present in tissues involved in the regulation of water balance. Neither proteins targeted for VACM-1/cul5-specific degradation nor factors that may regulate its expression in those tissues have been studied. To identify genes that may be misregulated by VACM-1 cDNA, we performed microarray analysis. Our results indicate that in cos-1 cells transfected with VACM-1 cDNA, mRNA levels for several genes, including AQP1, were decreased when compared to the control group. Our results also indicate that in cos-1 cells transfected with VACM-1 cDNA, endogenous AQP1 protein was decreased about 6-fold when compared to the controls. To test the hypothesis that VACM-1/cul5 may be regulated by conditions that compromise water homeostasis in vivo, we determined if 24 h of water deprivation affects VACM-1/cul5 levels or the effect of VACM-1/cul5 on AQP1. VACM-1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in rat mesenteric arteries, skeletal muscle and the heart ventricle but not in the heart atrium from 24-h water-deprived rats when compared to the controls. Interestingly, 24 h of water deprivation increased modification of VACM-1 by an ubiquitin-like protein, Nedd8, essential for cullin-dependent E3 ligase activity. Although water deprivation did not significantly change AQP1 levels in the mesenteric arteries, AQP1 protein concentrations were inversely correlated with the ratio of the VACM-1 to Nedd8-modified VACM-1. These results suggest that VACM-1/cul5 may regulate endothelial AQP1 concentration both in vivo and in vitro.
Colitis-associated cancer is dependent on the interplay between the hemostatic and inflammatory systems and supported by integrin alpha(M)beta(2) engagement of fibrinogen. - Cancer research
A link between colitis and colon cancer is well established, but the mechanisms regulating inflammation in this context are not fully defined. Given substantial evidence that hemostatic system components are powerful modulators of both inflammation and tumor progression, we used gene-targeted mice to directly test the hypothesis that the coagulation factor fibrinogen contributes to colitis-associated colon cancer in mice. This fundamental provisional matrix protein was found to be an important determinant of colon cancer. Fibrinogen deficiency resulted in a dramatic diminution in the number of colonic adenomas formed following azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate challenge. More detailed analyses in mice expressing a mutant form of fibrinogen that retains clotting function, but lacks the leukocyte integrin receptor alpha(M)beta(2) binding motif (Fibgamma(390-396A)), revealed that alpha(M)beta(2)-mediated engagement of fibrin(ogen) is mechanistically coupled to local inflammatory processes (e.g., interleukin-6 elaboration) and epithelial alterations that contribute to adenoma formation. Consistent with these findings, the majority of Fibgamma(390-396A) mice developed no discernable adenomas, whereas penetrance was 100% in controls. Furthermore, the adenomas harvested from Fibgamma(390-396A) mice were significantly smaller than those from control mice and less proliferative based on quantitative analyses of mitotic indices, suggesting an additional role for fibrin(ogen) in the growth of established adenomas. These studies show, for the first time, a unique link between fibrin(ogen) and the development of inflammation-driven malignancy. Given the importance of antecedent inflammation in the progression of numerous cancers, these studies suggest that therapies targeting fibrin(ogen)-alpha(M)beta(2) interactions may be useful in preventing and/or treating this important subset of malignancies.
Computational and functional analysis of growth hormone (GH)-regulated genes identifies the transcriptional repressor B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bc16) as a participant in GH-regulated transcription. - Endocrinology
For insight into transcriptional mechanisms mediating physiological responses to GH, data mining was performed on a profile of GH-regulated genes induced or inhibited at different times in highly responsive 3T3-F442A adipocytes. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that GH-regulated genes are enriched in pathways including phosphoinositide and insulin signaling and suggested that suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) and phosphoinositide 3' kinase regulatory subunit p85alpha (Pik3r1) are important targets. Model-based Chinese restaurant clustering identified a group of genes highly regulated by GH at times consistent with its key physiological actions. This cluster included IGF-I, phosphoinositide 3' kinase p85alpha, SOCS2, and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein. It also contains the most strongly repressed gene in the profile, B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6), a transcriptional repressor. Quantitative real-time PCR verified the strong decrease in Bcl6 mRNA after GH treatment and induction of the other genes in the cluster. Transcriptional network analysis of the genes implicated signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 5 as hub regulating the most responsive genes, Igf1, Socs2, Cish, and Bcl6. Transcriptional activation analysis demonstrated that Bcl6 inhibits SOCS2-luciferase and blunts its stimulation by GH. Occupancy of endogenous Bcl6 on SOCS2 DNA decreased after GH treatment, whereas occupancy of Stat5 increased concomitantly. Thus, GH-mediated inhibition of Bcl6 expression may reverse the repression of SOCS2 and facilitate SOCS2 activation by GH. Together these analyses identify Bcl6 as a participant in GH-regulated gene expression and suggest an interplay between the repressor Bcl6 and the activator Stat5 in regulating genes, which contribute to GH responses.
Factor XIII transglutaminase supports hematogenous tumor cell metastasis through a mechanism dependent on natural killer cell function. - Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH
Multiple studies suggest that the hemostatic and innate immune systems functionally cooperate in establishing the fraction of tumor cells that successfully form metastases. In particular, platelets and fibrinogen have been shown to support metastatic potential through a mechanism coupled to natural killer (NK) cell function. As the transglutaminase that ultimately stabilizes platelet/fibrin thrombi through the covalent crosslinking of fibrin, factor (F) XIII is another thrombin substrate that is likely to support hematogenous metastasis.Directly define the role of FXIII in tumor growth, tumor stroma formation, and metastasis.Tumor growth and metastatic potential were quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated in wild-type mice and gene-targeted mice lacking the catalytic FXIII-A subunit.Loss of FXIIIa function significantly diminished hematogenous metastatic potential in both experimental and spontaneous metastasis assays in immunocompetent mice. However, FXIII was not required for the growth of established tumors or tumor stroma formation. Rather, detailed analyses of the early fate of circulating tumor cells revealed that FXIII supports the early survival of micrometastases by a mechanism linked to NK cell function.Factor XIII is a significant determinant of metastatic potential and supports metastasis by impeding NK cell-mediated clearance of tumor cells. Given that these findings parallel previous observations in fibrinogen-deficient mice, an attractive hypothesis is that FXIII-mediated stabilization of fibrin/platelet thrombi associated with newly formed micrometastases increases the fraction of tumor cells capable of evading NK cell-mediated lysis.
Tumor cell-associated tissue factor and circulating hemostatic factors cooperate to increase metastatic potential through natural killer cell-dependent and-independent mechanisms. - Blood
Tumor cell-associated tissue factor (TF) is a powerful determinant of metastatic potential. TF may increase metastasis by supporting thrombin-mediated proteolysis, through intracellular signaling events mediated by the TF cytoplasmic domain, through TF/fVIIa/fXa-mediated activation of protease-activated receptors, or through a combination of these processes. To better define the relationship between tumor cell-associated TF and circulating hemostatic factors in malignancy, we generated a set of C57Bl/6-derived tumor lines genetically lacking TF, expressing wild-type murine TF, or expressing a mutant TF lacking the cytoplasmic domain. Comparison of the metastatic potential of these cells in immunocompetent mice with genetic deficits in prothrombin, platelet function, or fibrinogen revealed that TF supports metastasis through mechanisms independent of the cytoplasmic domain, but dependent on each of these distal hemostatic factors. TF was neither required for primary tumor growth nor necessary for initial localization of embolized tumor cells within the lungs. Rather, tumor cell fate studies indicated TF supports metastasis by increasing the survival of micrometastases. One mechanism linking TF to metastasis is through a fibrin(ogen)-dependent and platelet-dependent restriction in natural killer cell-mediated clearance of micrometastases. However, TF also supported the early success of micrometastases through an additional mechanism independent of natural killer cells, but coupled to circulating prothrombin.
Effect of experimental genital mycoplasmosis on production of matrix metalloproteinases in membranes and amniotic fluid of Sprague-Dawley rats. - American journal of reproductive immunology (New York, N.Y. : 1989)
Preterm, premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is a dire pregnancy outcome that is frequently associated with infection by the genital mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum, and U. urealyticum. One potential mechanism by which these microorganisms may cause PPROM is by increasing the concentration of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the membranes and amniotic fluid. We tested this hypothesis in a well-defined model system of genital infection with M. pulmonis, a natural reproductive pathogen of rats.Timed-pregnant, specific pathogen-free, Sprague-Dawley rats were infected with 10(7) CFU M. pulmonis at gestation day (gd) 14. Controls received an equivalent volume (100 microL) of sterile medium. At gd 18, rats were euthanized, and membranes and amniotic fluids were harvested and stored at -70 degrees C until analysis. Proteinase activity of amniotic fluid and membranes was resolved on discontinuous 7.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gelatin zymography gels. Band intensity was determined using a digital gel documentation system and the manufacturer's software (Kodak).Gelatinolytic activity associated with a band similar in molecular weight to ProMMP-9 (92 kDa, the inactive precursor of MMP-9) was significantly increased in amniotic fluids and membranes harvested from M. pulmonis-treated pups at gd 18 when compared with tissues harvested from control pups. Both ProMMP-9 and ProMMP-2 (72 kDa, the inactive precursor of MMP-2) were increased in infected animals at gd 21.Our study suggests that the genital mycoplasmas can increase MMP-9 production in vivo.
Cardiac glycosides provide neuroprotection against ischemic stroke: discovery by a brain slice-based compound screening platform. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
We report here the results of a chemical genetic screen using small molecules with known pharmacologies coupled with a cortical brain slice-based model for ischemic stroke. We identified a small-molecule compound not previously appreciated to have neuroprotective action in ischemic stroke, the cardiac glycoside neriifolin, and demonstrated that its properties in the brain slice assay included delayed therapeutic potential exceeding 6 h. Neriifolin is structurally related to the digitalis class of cardiac glycosides, and its putative target is the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Other cardiac glycoside compounds tested also showed neuroprotective activity, although with lower apparent potencies. In subsequent whole-animal studies, we found that neriifolin provided significant neuroprotection in a neonatal model of hypoxia/ischemia and in a middle cerebral artery occlusion model of transient focal ischemia. The neuroprotective potential of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is of particular interest because of its known "druggability"; indeed, Food and Drug Administration-approved, small-molecule compounds such as digitoxin and digoxin have been in clinical usage for congestive heart failure and arrhythmias for several decades. Thus, an existing cardiac glycoside or closely related compound could provide an accelerated path toward clinical trial testing for ischemic stroke. Our findings underscore the important role that hypothesis-neutral, high-content, tissue-based screens can play in the identification of new candidate drugs and drug targets for the treatment of diseases for which validated therapeutic pathways are not currently available.

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4630 Hwy 17 Bypass Murrells Inlet, SC 29576
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