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Dr. Gavin  Little  Do image

Dr. Gavin Little Do

46 Toll Rd Suite C
Salisbury MA 01952
978 623-3433
Medical School: Other - 1986
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 157794
NPI: 1598792004
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X 2084N0400X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Gavin Little is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$438.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$198.37
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$362.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$164.44
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$299.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$134.95
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$236.02 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$107.19
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$168.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$72.56
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$89.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.77
HCPCS Code:99211 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$80.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.57
HCPCS Code:85610 Description:Prothrombin time Average Price:$48.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$5.56
HCPCS Code:Q2036 Description:Flulaval vacc, 3 yrs & >, im Average Price:$48.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.70
HCPCS Code:82962 Description:Glucose blood test Average Price:$32.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.32
HCPCS Code:G0008 Description:Admin influenza virus vac Average Price:$48.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.29
HCPCS Code:G0434 Description:Drug screen multi drug class Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$16.55

HCPCS Code Definitions

99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99211
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, that may not require the presence of a physician or other qualified health care professional. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are minimal. Typically, 5 minutes are spent performing or supervising these services.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
G0008
Administration of influenza virus vaccine
G0434
Drug screen, other than chromatographic; any number of drug classes, by clia waived test or moderate complexity test, per patient encounter
Q2036
Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (flulaval)

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1417956418
Pain Management
6,088
1467446120
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
2,896
1881699668
Internal Medicine
2,675
1801887997
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,761
1881626190
Diagnostic Radiology
1,246
1003843590
Internal Medicine
1,162
1831121144
Diagnostic Radiology
979
1912901604
Internal Medicine
971
1073574042
Otolaryngology
946
1952360547
Diagnostic Radiology
874
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Little has made to other doctors

Publications

Colorectal Cancer Risk Following Adenoma Removal: A Large Prospective Population-Based Cohort Study. - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated significant reductions in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality associated with polypectomy. However, little is known about whether polypectomy is effective at reducing colorectal cancer risk in routine clinical practice. The aim of this investigation was to quantify colorectal cancer risk following polypectomy in a large prospective population-based cohort study.Patients with incident colorectal polyps between 2000 and 2005 in Northern Ireland were identified via electronic pathology reports received to the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry. Patients were matched to the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry to detect colorectal cancer and deaths up to December 31, 2010. Colorectal cancer standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated and Cox proportional hazards modeling applied to determine colorectal cancer risk.During 44,724 person-years of follow-up, 193 colorectal cancer cases were diagnosed among 6,972 adenoma patients, representing an annual progression rate of 0.43%. Colorectal cancer risk was significantly elevated in patients who had an adenoma removed (SIR, 2.85; 95% CI, 2.61-3.25) compared with the general population. Male sex, older age, rectal site, and villous architecture were associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk in adenoma patients. Further analysis suggested that not having a full colonoscopy performed at, or following, incident polypectomy contributed to the excess colorectal cancer risk.Colorectal cancer risk was elevated in individuals following polypectomy for adenoma, outside of screening programs.This finding emphasizes the need for full colonoscopy and adenoma clearance, and appropriate surveillance, after endoscopic diagnosis of adenoma.©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
Western spruce budworm outbreaks did not increase fire risk over the last three centuries: a dendrochronological analysis of inter-disturbance synergism. - PloS one
Insect outbreaks are often assumed to increase the severity or probability of fire occurrence through increased fuel availability, while fires may in turn alter susceptibility of forests to subsequent insect outbreaks through changes in the spatial distribution of suitable host trees. However, little is actually known about the potential synergisms between these natural disturbances. Assessing inter-disturbance synergism is challenging due to the short length of historical records and the confounding influences of land use and climate changes on natural disturbance dynamics. We used dendrochronological methods to reconstruct defoliator outbreaks and fire occurrence at ten sites along a longitudinal transect running from central Oregon to western Montana. We assessed synergism between disturbance types, analyzed long-term changes in disturbance dynamics, and compared these disturbance histories with dendroclimatological moisture availability records to quantify the influence of moisture availability on disturbances. After approximately 1890, fires were largely absent and defoliator outbreaks became longer-lasting, more frequent, and more synchronous at our sites. Fires were more likely to occur during warm-dry years, while outbreaks were most likely to begin near the end of warm-dry periods. Our results show no discernible impact of defoliation events on subsequent fire risk. Any effect from the addition of fuels during defoliation events appears to be too small to detect given the overriding influence of climatic variability. We therefore propose that if there is any relationship between the two disturbances, it is a subtle synergistic relationship wherein climate determines the probability of occurrence of each disturbance type, and each disturbance type damps the severity, but does not alter the probability of occurrence, of the other disturbance type over long time scales. Although both disturbance types may increase in frequency or extent in response to future warming, our records show no precedent that western spruce budworm outbreaks will increase future fire risk.
Impact of diet-induced obesity on intestinal stem cells: hyperproliferation but impaired intrinsic function that requires insulin/IGF1. - Endocrinology
Nutrient intake regulates intestinal epithelial mass and crypt proliferation. Recent findings in model organisms and rodents indicate nutrient restriction impacts intestinal stem cells (ISC). Little is known about the impact of diet-induced obesity (DIO), a model of excess nutrient intake on ISC. We used a Sox9-EGFP reporter mouse to test the hypothesis that an adaptive response to DIO or associated hyperinsulinemia involves expansion and hyperproliferation of ISC. The Sox9-EGFP reporter mouse allows study and isolation of ISC, progenitors, and differentiated lineages based on different Sox9-EGFP expression levels. Sox9-EGFP mice were fed a high-fat diet for 20 weeks to induce DIO and compared with littermates fed low-fat rodent chow. Histology, fluorescence activated cell sorting, and mRNA analyses measured impact of DIO on jejunal crypt-villus morphometry, numbers, and proliferation of different Sox9-EGFP cell populations and gene expression. An in vitro culture assay directly assessed functional capacity of isolated ISC. DIO mice exhibited significant increases in body weight, plasma glucose, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) levels and intestinal Igf1 mRNA. DIO mice had increased villus height and crypt density but decreased intestinal length and decreased numbers of Paneth and goblet cells. In vivo, DIO resulted in a selective expansion of Sox9-EGFP(Low) ISC and percentage of ISC in S-phase. ISC expansion significantly correlated with plasma insulin levels. In vitro, isolated ISC from DIO mice formed fewer enteroids in standard 3D Matrigel culture compared to controls, indicating impaired ISC function. This decreased enteroid formation in isolated ISC from DIO mice was rescued by exogenous insulin, IGF1, or both. We conclude that DIO induces specific increases in ISC and ISC hyperproliferation in vivo. However, isolated ISC from DIO mice have impaired intrinsic survival and growth in vitro that can be rescued by exogenous insulin or IGF1.
Oesophageal adenocarcinoma and prior diagnosis of Barrett's oesophagus: a population-based study. - Gut
Endoscopic surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus (BO) provides an opportunity to detect early stage oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). We sought to determine the proportion of OAC patients with a prior diagnosis of BO on a population basis and to evaluate the influence of a prior diagnosis of BO on survival, taking into account lead and length time biases.A retrospective population-based study of all OAC patients in Northern Ireland between 2003 and 2008. A prior BO diagnosis was determined by linkage to the Northern Ireland BO register. Stage distribution at diagnosis and histological grade were compared between patients with and without a prior BO diagnosis. Overall survival, using Cox models, was compared between patients with and without a prior BO diagnosis. The effect of adjusting the survival differences for histological grade and estimates of lead and length time bias was assessed.There were 716 OAC cases, 52 (7.3%) of whom had a prior BO diagnosis. Patients with a prior BO diagnosis had significantly lower tumour stage (44.2% vs. 11.1% had stage 1 or 2 disease; p<0.001), a higher rate of surgical resection (50.0% vs. 25.5%; p<0.001) and had a higher proportion of low/intermediate grade tumours (46.2% vs. 26.5%; p=0.011). A prior BO diagnosis was associated with significantly better survival (HR for death 0.39; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.58), which was minimally influenced by adjustment for age, sex and tumour grade (adjusted HR 0.44; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64). Correction for lead time bias attenuated but did not abolish the survival benefit (HR 0.65; 95% CI 0.45 to 0.95) and further adjustment for length time bias had little effect.The proportion of OAC patients with a prior diagnosis of BO is low; however, prior identification of BO is associated with an improvement in survival in OAC patients.Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
The Impact of Adjustment for Socioeconomic Status on Comparisons of Cancer Incidence between Two European Countries. - Journal of cancer epidemiology
Background. Cancer incidence rates vary considerably between countries and by socioeconomic status (SES). We investigate the impact of SES upon the relative cancer risk in two neighbouring countries. Methods. Data on 229,824 cases for 16 cancers diagnosed in 1995-2007 were extracted from the cancer registries in Northern Ireland (NI) and Republic of Ireland (RoI). Cancers in the two countries were compared using incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age and age plus area-based SES. Results. Adjusting for SES in addition to age had a considerable impact on NI/RoI comparisons for cancers strongly related to SES. Before SES adjustment, lung cancer incidence rates were 11% higher for males and 7% higher for females in NI, while after adjustment, the IRR was not statistically significant. Cervical cancer rates were lower in NI than in RoI after adjustment for age (IRR: 0.90 (0.84-0.97)), with this difference increasing after adjustment for SES (IRR: 0.85 (0.79-0.92)). For cancers with a weak or nonexistent relationship to SES, adjustment for SES made little difference to the IRR. Conclusion. Socioeconomic factors explain some international variations but also obscure other crucial differences; thus, adjustment for these factors should not become part of international comparisons.
The critical importance of defined media conditions in Daphnia magna nanotoxicity studies. - Toxicology letters
Due to the widespread use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), the likelihood of them entering the environment has increased and they are known to be potentially toxic. Currently, there is little information on the dynamic changes of AgNPs in ecotoxicity exposure media and how this may affect toxicity. Here, the colloidal stability of three different sizes of citrate-stabilized AgNPs was assessed in standard strength OECD ISO exposure media, and in 2-fold (media2) and 10-fold (media10) dilutions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and these characteristics were related to their toxicity towards Daphnia magna. Aggregation in undiluted media (media1) was rapid, and after diluting the medium by a factor of 2 or 10, aggregation was reduced, with minimal aggregation over 24h occurring in media10. Acute toxicity measurements were performed using 7nm diameter particles in media1 and media10. In media10 the EC50 of the 7nm particles for D. magna neonates was calculated to be 7.46μgL(-1) with upper and lower 95% confidence intervals of 6.84μgL(-1) and 8.13μgL(-1) respectively. For media1, an EC50 could not be calculated, the lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC) of 11.25μgL(-1) indicating a significant reduction in toxicity compared to that in media10. The data suggest the increased dispersion of nanoparticles leads to enhanced toxicity, emphasising the importance of appropriate media composition to fully assess nanoparticle toxicity in aquatic ecotoxicity tests.Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.
Insights into thermoregulation: a clinico-radiological description of Shapiro syndrome. - Journal of the neurological sciences
Shapiro syndrome is a rare entity, comprising a triad of recurrent hypothermia, hyperhidrosis and congenital agenesis of the corpus callosum. Fewer than 50 cases have been described, almost invariably in patients presenting in childhood or early adulthood. We present a case of an 80 year old woman presenting with recurrent bouts of shivering, sweating and profound malaise, who sought medical attention because the frequency and severity of attacks worsened in her later years. MRI Brain demonstrated agenesis of the corpus callosum; a rigorous work-up excluded other causes for her symptomatology. The intricate interplay of neuronal networks involved in thermoregulation remains to be fully elucidated and as such, little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the clinical manifestations of Shapiro syndrome. We present novel data from FDG-PET imaging of our patient, demonstrating hypermetabolism in a number of brainstem and cerebellar regions during the symptomatic phase. These findings imply that aberrant thermoregulation in Shapiro syndrome involves a number of structures remote from the callosal region. We also present neuropsychometric findings in our patient, of which there have been no reports to date. We postulate that the ageing brain may be more susceptible to the paroxysmal neurochemical fluxes implicated in the syndrome.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Description and predictors of hospital costs of oesophageal cancer during the first year following diagnosis in Northern Ireland. - European journal of cancer care
The cost-effectiveness of novel interventions in the treatment of cancer is well researched; however, relatively little attention is paid to the cost of many aspects of routine care. Oesophageal cancer is the ninth most common cancer in the UK and sixth most common cause of cancer death. It usually presents late and has a poor prognosis. The hospital costs incurred by oesophageal cancer patients diagnosed in Northern Ireland in 2005 (n = 198) were determined by review of medical records. The average cost of hospital care per patient in the 12 months from presentation was £7847. Variations in total hospital costs by age at diagnosis, gender, cancer stage, histological type, mortality at 1 year, co-morbidity count and socio-economic status were analysed using multiple regression analyses. Higher costs were associated with earlier stages of cancer and cancer stage remained a significant predictor of costs after controlling for cancer type, patient age and mortality at 1 year. Thus, although early detection of cancer usually improves survival, this would mean increased costs in the first year. Deprivation achieved borderline significance with those from more deprived areas having lower resource consumption relative to the more affluent.© 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Long-term perspective on wildfires in the western USA. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Understanding the causes and consequences of wildfires in forests of the western United States requires integrated information about fire, climate changes, and human activity on multiple temporal scales. We use sedimentary charcoal accumulation rates to construct long-term variations in fire during the past 3,000 y in the American West and compare this record to independent fire-history data from historical records and fire scars. There has been a slight decline in burning over the past 3,000 y, with the lowest levels attained during the 20th century and during the Little Ice Age (LIA, ca. 1400-1700 CE [Common Era]). Prominent peaks in forest fires occurred during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (ca. 950-1250 CE) and during the 1800s. Analysis of climate reconstructions beginning from 500 CE and population data show that temperature and drought predict changes in biomass burning up to the late 1800s CE. Since the late 1800s , human activities and the ecological effects of recent high fire activity caused a large, abrupt decline in burning similar to the LIA fire decline. Consequently, there is now a forest "fire deficit" in the western United States attributable to the combined effects of human activities, ecological, and climate changes. Large fires in the late 20th and 21st century fires have begun to address the fire deficit, but it is continuing to grow.
Mediators of adverse birth outcomes among socially disadvantaged women. - Journal of women's health (2002)
Numerous studies find that socially disadvantaged women are more likely than socially advantaged women to deliver infants that weigh less than normal and/or are born weeks prior to their due date. However, little is known about the pathways that link maternal social disadvantage to birth outcomes. Using data from a prospective cohort study, we examined whether antenatal psychosocial stress, substance use, and maternal health conditions in pregnancy mediated the pathway between maternal social disadvantage and birth outcomes.Analyses used structural equation modeling to examine data from a community clinic-based sample (n=2168) of pregnant women who completed questionnaires assessing psychosocial functioning and health behaviors as well as sociodemographic characteristics, which were matched with subsequent birth outcome data.Analyses revealed maternal social disadvantage predicted poorer birth outcomes through a mediated pathway including maternal health conditions in pregnancy.The findings demonstrate that maternal social disadvantage is associated with poor health status in pregnancy, which in turn adversely affects birth outcomes. Results argue for more systematic attention to the roles of social disadvantage, including life course perspectives that trace social disadvantage prior to and through pregnancy.

Map & Directions

46 Toll Rd Suite C Salisbury, MA 01952
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141 Bridge Rd Suite 101
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