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Dr. Joel  Raichlen  Md image

Dr. Joel Raichlen Md

505 Hoffman Dr
Bryn Mawr PA 19010
610 255-5004
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: MD021790E
NPI: 1588842835
Taxonomy Codes:
207RC0000X

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Efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin therapy in children and adolescents with familial hypercholesterolemia: Results from the CHARON study. - Journal of clinical lipidology
Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) is an autosomal dominant disorder leading to premature atherosclerosis. Guidelines recommend initiating statins early to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Studies have evaluated rosuvastatin in children aged ≥10 years, but its efficacy and safety in younger children is unknown.Children with HeFH and fasting LDL-C >4.92 mmol/L (190 mg/dL) or >4.10 mmol/L (>158 mg/dL) with other cardiovascular risk factors received rosuvastatin 5 mg daily. Based on LDL-C targets (<2.85 mmol/L [<110 mg/dL]), rosuvastatin could be uptitrated to 10 mg (aged 6-9 years) or 20 mg (aged 10-17 years). Treatment lasted 2 years. Changes in lipid values, growth, sexual maturation, and adverse events (AEs) were assessed.The intention-to-treat analysis included 197 patients. At 24 months, LDL-C was reduced by 43, 45, and 35% vs baseline in patients aged 6-9, 10-13, and 14-17 years, respectively (P < .001 for all groups). Most AEs were mild. Intermittent myalgia was reported in 11 (6%) patients and did not lead to discontinuation of rosuvastatin treatment. Serious AEs were reported by 9 (5%) patients, all considered unrelated to treatment by the investigators. No clinically important changes in hepatic biochemistry were reported. Rosuvastatin treatment did not appear to adversely affect height, weight, or sexual maturation.In HeFH patients aged 6-17 years, rosuvastatin 5-20 mg over 2 years significantly reduced LDL-C compared with baseline. Treatment was well tolerated, with no adverse effects on growth or sexual maturation.Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Sex-related differences of coronary atherosclerosis regression following maximally intensive statin therapy: insights from SATURN. - JACC. Cardiovascular imaging
The study sought to explore sex-related differences in coronary atheroma regression following high-intensity statin therapy.Guidelines now recommend high-intensity statins in all individuals with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.SATURN (Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin) employed serial intravascular ultrasound measures of coronary atheroma volume in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. The treatment groups did not differ significantly in change from baseline of percent atheroma volume (PAV) or total atheroma volume (TAV) on intravascular ultrasound, nor in safety or clinical outcomes.Compared with men (n = 765), women (n = 274) were older (p < 0.001) and more likely to have hypertension (p < 0.001), diabetes (p = 0.002), and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p = 0.01), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.001), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.004) levels. At follow-up, women had higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.001) and CRP (p < 0.001), but similar LDL-C (p = 0.46) levels compared with men. Compared with men, women had lower baseline PAV (34.0 ± 8.0% vs. 37.2 ± 8.2%, p < 0.001) and TAV (122.4 ± 55 mm(3) vs. 151.9 ± 63 mm(3), p < 0.001), yet demonstrated greater PAV regression (-1.52 ± 0.18% vs. -1.07 ± 0.10%, p = 0.03) and TAV regression (-8.27 ± 0.9 mm(3) vs. -6.59 ± 0.50 mm(3), p = 0.11) following treatment. Greater PAV regression in women versus men occurred with rosuvastatin (p = 0.004), those with diabetes (p = 0.01), stable coronary disease (p = 0.01), higher baseline LDL-C (p = 0.02), and higher CRP (p = 0.04) levels. On multivariable analysis, female sex was independently associated with PAV regression (p = 0.01), and a sex-treatment interaction was found (p = 0.036). For participants with on-treatment LDL-C levels <70 mg/dl, women achieved greater PAV regression (-1.81 ± 0.22% vs. -1.12 ± 0.13%, p = 0.007) and TAV regression (-10.1 ± 1.1 mm(3) vs. -7.16 ± 0.65 mm(3), p = 0.023) than men, whereas PAV and TAV regression did not differ by sex, with LDL-C levels ≥70 mg/dl.Women with coronary disease demonstrate greater coronary atheroma regression than men when empirically prescribed guideline-driven potent statin therapy. This benefit appears in the setting of lower on-treatment LDL-C levels. (CRESTOR Athero Imaging Head to Head IVUS Study [SATURN]; NCT000620542).Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Antiatherosclerotic effects of long-term maximally intensive statin therapy after acute coronary syndrome: insights from Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin. - Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology
Patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) display diffuse coronary atheroma instability and heightened risk of early and late recurrent coronary events. We compared the long-term antiatherosclerotic efficacy of high-intensity statins in patients with ACS when compared with stable disease.Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin (SATURN) used serial intravascular ultrasound measures of coronary atheroma volume in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. The overall effect of high-intensity statins on the change in coronary percent atheroma volume and major adverse cardiovascular events (death/nonfatal myocardial infarction/coronary revascularization) were evaluated in this post hoc analysis. When compared with non-ACS patients (n=678), patients with ACS (n=361) were younger, actively smoking, and have had a previous myocardial infarction (all P<0.001). At baseline, patients with ACS exhibited lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (43.5±11 versus 45.8±11 mg/dL; P=0.002), a higher apolipoprotein B: apolipoprotein A-1 ratio (0.90±0.24 versus 0.83±0.24; P<0.001) and greater percent atheroma volume (37.3±8.5% versus 35.9±8.1%; P=0.01) when compared with non-ACS patients. Despite similar achieved levels of lipid and inflammatory markers after high-intensity statin therapy, patients with ACS demonstrated greater percent atheroma volume regression than non-ACS patients (-1.46±0.14 versus -0.89±0.13; P=0.003). After propensity-weighted multivariable adjustment, baseline percent atheroma volume (P<0.001) and an ACS clinical presentation (P=0.02) independently associated with plaque regression. The 24-month major adverse cardiovascular events-free survival was similar between patients with ACS and non-ACS (90.6 versus 92.9%; P=0.25).Long-term high-intensity statin therapy caused greater plaque regression and comparable major adverse cardiovascular events rates in ACS when compared with non-ACS patients. Despite a higher clinical risk profile, patients with ACS harbor a more modifiable disease substrate and seem to benefit the most from potent statin therapy.© 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.
High-intensity statin therapy alters the natural history of diabetic coronary atherosclerosis: insights from SATURN. - Diabetes care
Although statins can induce coronary atheroma regression, this benefit has yet to be demonstrated in diabetic individuals. We tested the hypothesis that high-intensity statin therapy may promote coronary atheroma regression in patients with diabetes.The Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin (SATURN) used serial intravascular ultrasound measures of coronary atheroma volume in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. This analysis compared changes in biochemistry and coronary percent atheroma volume (PAV) in patients with (n = 159) and without (n = 880) diabetes.At baseline, patients with diabetes had lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels but higher triglyceride and CRP levels compared with patients without diabetes. At follow-up, diabetic patients had lower levels of LDL-C (61.0 ± 20.5 vs. 66.4 ± 22.9 mg/dL, P = 0.01) and HDL-C (46.3 ± 10.6 vs. 49.9 ± 12.0 mg/dL, P < 0.001) but higher levels of triglycerides (127.6 [98.8, 163.0] vs. 113.0 mg/dL [87.6, 151.9], P = 0.001) and CRP (1.4 [0.7, 3.3] vs. 1.0 [0.5, 2.1] mg/L, P = 0.001). Both patients with and without diabetes demonstrated regression of coronary atheroma as measured by change in PAV (-0.83 ± 0.13 vs. -1.15 ± 0.13%, P = 0.08). PAV regression was less in diabetic compared with nondiabetic patients when on-treatment LDL-C levels were >70 mg/dL (-0.31 ± 0.23 vs. -1.01 ± 0.21%, P = 0.03) but similar when LDL-C levels were ≤70 mg/dL (-1.09 ± 0.16 vs. -1.24 ± 0.16%, P = 0.50).High-intensity statin therapy alters the progressive nature of diabetic coronary atherosclerosis, yielding regression of disease in diabetic and nondiabetic patients.© 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
Long-term effects of maximally intensive statin therapy on changes in coronary atheroma composition: insights from SATURN. - European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging
To evaluate the effect of long-term maximally intensive statin therapy on indices of coronary atheroma composition in a randomized trial, and how these changes relate to modifications of serum lipoproteins and systemic inflammation.The Study of coronary Atheroma by inTravascular Ultrasound: the effect of Rosuvastatin vs. atorvastatiN (SATURN) employed serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measures of coronary atheroma in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg daily for 24 months. Seventy-one patients underwent serial assessment of indices of plaque composition by spectral analysis of the radiofrequency IVUS signal. Changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C; -52 (-72, -33) mg/dL, P < 0.001], C-reactive protein [CRP -0.2 (-1, 0.1) mg/L, P = 0.01], and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C; +2.8 (-0.3, 7.8) mg/dL, P < 0.001] were associated with regression of percent atheroma volume (PAV: -1.6 ± 3.6%, P < 0.001). A reduction in estimated fibro-fatty tissue volume accompanied atheroma regression (P < 0.001), while dense calcium tissue volume increased (P = 0.002). There were no changes in fibrous or necrotic core tissue volumes. Volumetric changes in necrotic core tissue correlated with on-treatment HDL-C (r = -0.27, P = 0.03) and CRP (r = 0.25, P = 0.03) levels. A per-lesion analysis showed a reduction in the number of pathological intimal thickening lesions (defined by ≥3 consecutive IVUS frames containing PAV of ≥40%, predominantly fibro-fatty plaque, with <10% confluent necrotic core and <10% confluent dense calcium) at follow-up (67 vs. 38, P = 0.001). Fibroatheromas and fibrotic lesions remained static in number.Changes in indices of atheroma composition accompany regression of coronary atheroma with maximally intensive statin therapy, and associate with anti-inflammatory effects of statins.NCT000620542.
C-reactive protein, but not low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, associate with coronary atheroma regression and cardiovascular events after maximally intensive statin therapy. - Circulation
Baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) levels predict major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: death, myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, and hospitalization for unstable angina). The association between changes in CRP levels with plaque progression and MACE in the setting of maximally intensive statin therapy is unknown.The Study of Coronary Atheroma by Intravascular Ultrasound: Effect of Rosuvastatin Versus Atorvastatin (SATURN) used serial intravascular ultrasound measures of coronary atheroma volume in patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg for 24 months. The treatment groups did not differ significantly in the change from baseline of percent atheroma volume on intravascular ultrasound, CRP-modulating effects, or MACE rates, thus allowing for a (prespecified) post hoc analysis to test associations between the changes in CRP levels with coronary disease progression and MACE. Patients with nonincreasing CRP levels (n=621) had higher baseline (2.3 [1.1-4.7] versus 1.1 [0.5-1.8] mg/L; P<0.001) and lower follow-up CRP levels (0.8 [0.5-1.7] versus 1.6 [0.7-4.1] mg/L; P<0.001) versus those with increasing CRP levels (n=364). Multivariable analysis revealed a nonincreasing CRP level to independently associate with greater percent atheroma volume regression (P=0.01). Although the (log) change in CRP did not associate with MACE (hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-1.50; P=0.17), the (log) on-treatment CRP associated significantly with MACE (hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.56; P=0.02). On-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels did not correlate with MACE (hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-1.35; P=0.45).Following 24 months of potent statin therapy, on-treatment CRP levels associated with MACE. Inflammation may be an important driver of residual cardiovascular risk in patients with coronary artery disease despite aggressive statin therapy.http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT000620542.
Coronary atheroma volume and cardiovascular events during maximally intensive statin therapy. - European heart journal
The impact of baseline coronary plaque burden on the clinical outcome in patients receiving aggressive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering therapy to levels <70 mg/dL is unknown. We assessed the prognostic significance of baseline coronary plaque burden following high-intensity statin therapy.SATURN used serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) to measure coronary atheroma volume in 1039 patients before and after 24 months of treatment with rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg. This post hoc analysis compared the relationship between baseline percent atheroma volume (PAV) and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: death, myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, hospitalization for unstable angina) in patients with baseline PAV less than (n = 519) or greater than (n = 520) the median. Patients with a higher baseline PAV had a similar LDL-C compared with those with a lower baseline PAV at baseline (119.0 ± 29 vs. 121.0 ± 27 mg/dL, P = 0.09) and at follow-up (65.3 ± 23 vs. 65.8 ± 22 mg/dL, P = 0.47). In multivariable analysis, each standard deviation increase in baseline PAV was associated with a 28% increase in MACE [HR 1.28 (1.05, 1.57), P = 0.01]. Those with the highest quartile of baseline PAV (>41.8%) had a 2-year cumulative MACE rate of 12%, which was significantly higher (log-rank P = 0.001) than MACE rates of all lower PAV quartiles (MACE: quartile 3, 2, and 1 were 5.7, 7.9, and 5.1%, respectively). LDL-C levels at baseline [HR 0.96 (0.79, 1.18), P = 0.73] and on-treatment [HR 1.19 (0.83, 1.73), P = 0.35] were not associated with MACE.Following 2 years of high-intensity statin therapy, a baseline coronary atheroma volume predicted MACE, despite the achievement of very low on-treatment LDL-C levels.
Factors underlying regression of coronary atheroma with potent statin therapy. - European heart journal
Statins can inhibit the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to characterize clinical factors that associate with differing measures of coronary atheroma volume following potent statin therapy.SATURN employed serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) to monitor changes in measures of coronary atheroma burden [total atheroma volume (TAV) and per cent atheroma volume (PAV)] in 1039 patients with coronary artery disease, treated with rosuvastatin (40 mg) or atorvastatin (80 mg) daily for 24 months. Rosuvastatin-treated patients demonstrated greater reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, 47 vs. 40%, P < 0.001) and greater increases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, 13 vs. 10%, P = 0.02). These alterations in the lipid profile associated with greater TAV (-6.4 vs. -4.4 mm(3), P = 0.01), but not PAV (-1.22 vs. -0.99%, P = 0.17) regression. Greater TAV reductions with rosuvastatin vs. atorvastatin occurred in patients with diabetes (P = 0.01, treatment by diabetic status interaction P-value 0.05). Greater PAV reductions with rosuvastatin were evident in females (P = 0.01, treatment by sex interaction P-value 0.03) and in those with greater than or equal to median baseline LDL-C (P = 0.02, treatment by LDL-C group interaction P-value 0.03) or HDL-C levels (P = 0.02, treatment by HDL-C group interaction P-value 0.04). On multivariable analysis assessing change in TAV and PAV, both higher baseline TAV and PAV independently associated with TAV and PAV regression, respectively (standardized estimates: TAV -0.25, P < 0.001; PAV -0.23, P < 0.001).Higher-risk patients, particularly those with greater baseline coronary atheroma volume, are more likely to experience less disease progression with potent statin therapy.
Alteration of relation of atherogenic lipoprotein cholesterol to apolipoprotein B by intensive statin therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome (from the Limiting UNdertreatment of lipids in ACS With Rosuvastatin [LUNAR] Trial). - The American journal of cardiology
The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goal of <70 mg/dl, recommended for patients with acute coronary syndrome, typically requires intensive therapy with high-dose statins. The secondary goals of non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol <100 mg/dl and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) <80 mg/dl have been recommended to reduce excess cardiovascular risk not captured by LDL cholesterol. The present post hoc analysis from the Limiting UNdertreatment of lipids in Acute coronary syndrome with Rosuvastatin (LUNAR) study examined the relation of ApoB with LDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol at baseline and during treatment with intensive statin therapy. The LUNAR participants had acute coronary syndrome and received rosuvastatin 40 mg/day or 20 mg/day or atorvastatin 80 mg/day for 12 weeks. Linear regression analyses were used to compare ApoB, direct LDL cholesterol, and non-HDL cholesterol at baseline and during therapy. Of the 682 patients included in the analysis, 220 had triglycerides ≥200 mg/dl. Linear regression analysis showed that correlation of ApoB and non-HDL cholesterol was stronger than that of ApoB and LDL cholesterol and stronger with statin therapy than at baseline (R(2) = 0.93 for ApoB vs non-HDL cholesterol with statins). The target of ApoB of 80 mg/dl correlated with LDL cholesterol of 90 mg/dl and non-HDL cholesterol of 110 mg/dl at baseline and with LDL cholesterol of 74 mg/dl and non-HDL cholesterol of 92 mg/dl with statin therapy. For high-triglyceride patients, the corresponding on-treatment targets were LDL cholesterol of 68 mg/dl and non-HDL cholesterol of 92 mg/dl. In conclusion, non-HDL cholesterol is an adequate surrogate of ApoB during statin therapy, independent of triglyceride status. However, to match LDL cholesterol and ApoB treatment goals in the very-high-risk category, the current non-HDL cholesterol goal should be lowered by 8 to 10 mg/dl.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Cardiac imaging approaches to evaluate drug-induced myocardial dysfunction. - American heart journal
The ability to make informed benefit-risk assessments for potentially cardiotoxic new compounds is of considerable interest and importance at the public health, drug development, and individual patient levels. Cardiac imaging approaches in the evaluation of drug-induced myocardial dysfunction will likely play an increasing role. However, the optimal choice of myocardial imaging modality and the recommended frequency of monitoring are undefined. These decisions are complicated by the array of imaging techniques, which have varying sensitivities, specificities, availabilities, local expertise, safety, and costs, and by the variable time-course of tissue damage, functional myocardial depression, or recovery of function. This White Paper summarizes scientific discussions of members of the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium on the main factors to consider when selecting nonclinical and clinical cardiac function imaging techniques in drug development. We focus on 3 commonly used imaging modalities in the evaluation of cardiac function: echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radionuclide (nuclear) imaging and highlight areas for future research.Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

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