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Dr. Jonathan  Schiff  Md image

Dr. Jonathan Schiff Md

1120 Park Ave
New York NY 10128
212 966-6660
Medical School: Mount Sinai School Of Medicine Of City University Of New York - 1999
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 218104
NPI: 1588694723
Taxonomy Codes:
208800000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Jonathan Schiff is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:52224 Description:Cystoscopy and treatment Average Price:$3,500.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$771.72
HCPCS Code:51702 Description:Insert temp bladder cath Average Price:$450.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$81.81
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$575.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$212.81
HCPCS Code:53661 Description:Dilation of urethra Average Price:$405.11 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$79.67
HCPCS Code:51741 Description:Electro-uroflowmetry first Average Price:$350.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$27.40
HCPCS Code:76872 Description:Us transrectal Average Price:$450.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$149.44
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$370.31 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$75.88
HCPCS Code:51700 Description:Irrigation of bladder Average Price:$385.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$94.83
HCPCS Code:51720 Description:Treatment of bladder lesion Average Price:$400.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$123.50
HCPCS Code:76856 Description:Us exam pelvic complete Average Price:$400.89 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$137.88
HCPCS Code:76870 Description:Us exam scrotum Average Price:$400.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$144.07
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$390.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$177.48
HCPCS Code:51798 Description:Us urine capacity measure Average Price:$225.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$22.35
HCPCS Code:76770 Description:Us exam abdo back wall comp Average Price:$350.23 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$151.52
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$256.02 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$78.05
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$280.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$115.13
HCPCS Code:76857 Description:Us exam pelvic limited Average Price:$225.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$92.81
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$50.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00
HCPCS Code:J1080 Description:Testosterone cypionat 200 MG Average Price:$45.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$6.38
HCPCS Code:81000 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/scope Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.48

HCPCS Code Definitions

76770
Ultrasound, retroperitoneal (eg, renal, aorta, nodes), real time with image documentation; complete
53661
Dilation of female urethra including suppository and/or instillation; subsequent
52224
Cystourethroscopy, with fulguration (including cryosurgery or laser surgery) or treatment of MINOR (less than 0.5 cm) lesion(s) with or without biopsy
51702
Insertion of temporary indwelling bladder catheter; simple (eg, Foley)
51798
Measurement of post-voiding residual urine and/or bladder capacity by ultrasound, non-imaging
51700
Bladder irrigation, simple, lavage and/or instillation
51720
Bladder instillation of anticarcinogenic agent (including retention time)
51741
Complex uroflowmetry (eg, calibrated electronic equipment)
76872
Ultrasound, transrectal
76870
Ultrasound, scrotum and contents
76856
Ultrasound, pelvic (nonobstetric), real time with image documentation; complete
76857
Ultrasound, pelvic (nonobstetric), real time with image documentation; limited or follow-up (eg, for follicles)
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
J1080
Injection, testosterone cypionate, 1 cc, 200 mg
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1487648176
Endocrinology
1,413
1548288392
Internal Medicine
664
1497726970
Radiation Oncology
601
1396711776
Geriatric Medicine
592
1811919277
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
578
1821126590
Diagnostic Radiology
555
1083766729
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
529
1497853063
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
495
1780655522
Diagnostic Radiology
408
1811968613
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
402
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Schiff has made to other doctors

Publications

Sex chromosome micromosaicism in infertile men with normal karyotypes. - Fertility and sterility
To define the prevalence of low-level sex chromosome mosaicism in a cohort of infertile men.Prospective cohort study of infertile men.Tertiary university infertility center.One hundred one consecutive men who presented with primary infertility for evaluation.Fluorescent in situ hybridization for X and Y was performed on 200 cells, and if an aberrant sex chromosome complement was noted, 400 cells were counted. For this study, any abnormality in sex chromosome complement was defined as micromosaicism.Low-level sex chromosome mosaicism.Sixty-seven of these men (67%) had no mosaicism, and 34 men (34%) had micromosaicism. The median percentage of abnormal chromosomes in these men was 2%. The mean age of the men without micromosaicism was lower than for men with micromosaicism (31.1 years vs. 35.2 years). A trend toward higher FSH levels in men with low-level mosaicism was seen. Median sperm density and percent motility were higher in normal men. Percent normal morphology was identical between groups.We found low-level sex chromosome mosaicism in 34% of infertile men who presented for evaluation. Men with low-level mosaicism were significantly older. Low-level mosaicism may emerge with advancing age and may therefore help to explain the decline in fertility potential seen in older men.Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
The morphology of extracted testicular sperm correlates with fertilization but not pregnancy rates. - BJU international
To investigate sperm morphology on the day of fresh testicular sperm extraction (TESE) with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and its effect on fertilization and pregnancy rates, as TESE in conjunction with ICSI results in high fertilization and pregnancy rates in most patients, but to our knowledge only one small study has assessed the morphology of retrieved sperm and found no correlation with the success of fertilization.In a retrospective database analysis in a large academic centre, 68 men had 75 cycles of TESE combined with ICSI from January 2004 until April 2006. Sperm obtained by TESE was morphologically analysed at high (x 400-600) magnification and used for ICSI on the day of tissue retrieval. Sperm were classified as being either normal, having an amorphous head, having a mid-piece defect or having multiple defects. The calculated percentage of abnormal sperm injected was compared with the normal fertilization rate using Pearson's correlation coefficient, and pregnancy rates between groups were compared using chi-square analysis.Fifteen cycles had all morphologically normal sperm; 21 cycles had 50-99% normal forms and 39 cycles had <50% normal sperm. There was a highly significant correlation between the percentage of normal sperm used for ICSI and fertilization rates (P = 0.007). Overall, 43 clinical pregnancies resulted in this series, i.e. three among the group with all normal sperm injected, 12 in the group with 50-99% normal sperm and 28 in the group with <50% normal forms. There were also 11 pregnancies in cycles that used no normal forms. Pregnancy rates did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.08).TESE with ICSI frequently results in successful pregnancy; normal morphology was highly and significantly associated with successful fertilization, but importantly there were still 10 clinical pregnancies in cycles where only abnormal sperm were used. Sperm morphology after TESE should be assessed at the time of the procedure, and whenever possible, morphologically normal sperm chosen for injection. However, it is reassuring that acceptable fertilization and pregnancy rates are still achievable in cases with no morphologically normal sperm available.
Medical and surgical management male infertility. - Endocrinology and metabolism clinics of North America
Male infertility is the result of a variety of highly treatable conditions. The critical step in treating male infertility is to evaluate properly every male partner of an infertile couple and to generate the proper treatment strategy. There are many medical and surgical options that can help most couples overcome male factor infertility. Male infertility can most easily be broken down into problems of sperm production (testicular dysfunction) and problems of sperm transport (obstruction). When applicable, medical therapies are used as an initial strategy to improve sperm production or as a preliminary therapy to boost production transiently in anticipation of a surgical sperm retrieval attempt. A range of surgical options is available to correct varicoceles, reconstruct the obstructed system, or retrieve sperm for assisted reproduction.
Innovative single-armed suture technique for microsurgical vasoepididymostomy. - Urology
Vasoepididymostomy outcomes are heavily dependent on the surgeon's microsurgical experience and skill. To avoid back-walling the tubular lumen, the needles are generally placed inside-out through the vasal lumen using double-armed microsutures. These double-armed sutures for infertility microsurgery are very expensive and may be difficult to obtain. We describe a randomized trial that used a novel single-armed suture placement pattern for vasoepididymostomy.Male adult Wistar rats underwent vasectomy. Two weeks later, vasoepididymostomies were performed using either a single-armed longitudinal intussusception vasoepididymostomy (n = 6) or a standard double-armed longitudinal intussusception vasoepididymostomy (n = 6) technique. After 9 weeks, patency was assessed functionally by evaluating for motile sperm distal to the anastomosis. If no motile sperm were visible, the mechanical patency of the anastomoses was tested by the ability of methylene blue to pass through the surgical anastomosis.The patency rate for the double-armed vasoepididymostomy group was 100% (6 of 6) compared with 83.3% (5 of 6) for the single-armed vasoepididymostomy group. This difference was not significant (P = 0.50). Sperm granulomas were found in three (50%) of six anastomoses in the double-armed group and five (83%) of six anastomoses in the single-armed vasoepididymostomy group (P = 0.27). The mean operative times for the double and single-armed longitudinal intussusception vasoepididymostomy techniques were similar (35 minutes versus 43 minutes; P = 0.39).The results of our study have shown that the single-armed suture technique to perform vasoepididymostomy is almost as effective as the double-armed technique. Although we still prefer to use double-armed sutures, we believe that this is a practical and effective alternative when specialized double-armed microsurgical sutures are not available.
Renal artery thrombosis following secondary cytoreduction in a patient with ovarian cancer. - Gynecologic oncology
In order to successfully perform aggressive cytoreductive surgery for patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, resection of retroperitoneal disease in close proximity to major vessels is often required.We describe a case of a 44-year-old female patient with a history of Stage IV carcinoma of the ovary, who underwent a successful secondary debulking procedure. To remove the left para-aortic tumor implant she required complete mobilization of the left kidney, with skeletonization of the left renal artery and vein. Postoperatively, the patient developed left renal artery thrombosis necessitating a unilateral nephrectomy.This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of renal artery thrombosis following a debulking procedure. Gynecologic oncologists should be aware of this possibility and be familiar with the diagnosis and management of this condition.
Early use of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor after brachytherapy restores and preserves erectile function. - BJU international
To investigate whether the early use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDEIs) after brachytherapy (BT) is associated with better erectile function, as of men potent before BT 38-70% have erectile dysfunction afterward.We evaluated a prospectively created database of 2500 patients who had had BT at our institution since 1992. We measured baseline age, cancer stage, Gleason grade, prostate specific antigen (PSA) level at diagnosis, implant type, use of neoadjuvant and adjuvant hormonal suppression therapy, use of external beam radiotherapy in conjunction with interstitial therapy, and follow-up PSA levels. Men were stratified by their use of PDEIs at <1 year (early group) or >1 year after implantation (late group). We excluded all men who did not have baseline Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) scores and at least one follow-up SHIM score; the latter were obtained at 6-month intervals after BT. Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test.In all, 210 men met the inclusion criteria; 85 began using PDEIs within a year of BT, and 125 started after a year. The mean time to PDEI use was 191 days in the early and 595 days in the late group. The median age was 62 years in the early and 63 years in the late group (P = 0.02). Baseline Gleason scores did not differ, nor did PSA levels between the groups. Of men in the early group, 48% received neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant hormonal suppression therapy, vs half of men in the late group. Baseline SHIM scores were not significantly different, nor were scores at the first two follow-up assessments, but the scores at 18-36 months after BT were significantly different.The early use of PDEIs after BT is associated with a significant improvement in and maintenance of erectile function compared with late use. Men undergoing BT should be encouraged to use PDEIs early after implantation, to preserve erectile function.
Correlation of ultrasound-measured venous size and reversal of flow with Valsalva with improvement in semen-analysis parameters after varicocelectomy. - Fertility and sterility
We studied 68 men with varicoceles to determine preoperative parameters that are associated with improvements in semen analysis after varicocelectomy. Ultrasound-measured venous diameter and reversal of flow were found to correlate with successful outcome.
An analysis of the natural history of Peyronie's disease. - The Journal of urology
Little information exists on the natural history of PD. We defined the course of PD in a group of men with this condition who received no treatment.The study population comprised patients with PD who presented within 6 months of disease onset, had no medical treatment and were followed until at least 12 months after disease onset. At baseline and followup penile abnormality was determined following intracavernous injection and by measurement at maximum penile rigidity.A total of 246 patients met inclusion criteria. At presentation mean age +/- SD was 52 +/- 22 years and the duration of PD was 3.5 +/- 1.5 months. At baseline in men with documented curvature 72% had dorsal, 17% had ventral and 11% had lateral curvature. Mean curvature at baseline was 42 +/- 22 degrees. Mean stretched flaccid penile length was 12.2 cm. The mean duration of PD at the followup assessment was 18 +/- 7 months. At followup stretched flaccid length had decreased to 11.4 cm (p = 0.035). Of the patients 32% complained of some degree of erectile dysfunction at baseline. All patients who reported penile pain had improvement and 89% reported complete resolution at followup. Of men with curvature 12% had improved, 40% remained stable and 48% had worsened at followup. In those in whom curvature improved the mean change was 15 degrees, while in those in whom curvature worsened the mean change was 22 degrees.To our knowledge this is the largest study to explore the natural history of PD. A minority of men experienced improvement in penile abnormality, while penile length decreased during the 1-year followup. This information will permit clinicians to provide patients with realistic expectations at presentation for the evaluation of PD.
Ion channel gene therapy for smooth muscle disorders: relaxing smooth muscles to treat erectile dysfunction. - Assay and drug development technologies
The promise of gene therapy to treat diseases remains largely unfulfilled. Past setbacks and the complexity of the delivery systems used, in terms of both targeting the appropriate cells and inducing expression of products at therapeutic levels, thus far have prevented significant success for gene therapy. Smooth muscle disorders represent a unique target for gene therapy. In many cases, smooth muscle is readily accessible and, to induce a therapeutic effect, will not require very high levels of gene product expression. This allows a lower efficiency of gene transfer to be successful. With these important features in mind, we believe that naked DNA transfer of potassium ion channels represents a novel and successful way to treat smooth muscle disorders. Herein, we present a rationale for treating erectile dysfunction, a smooth muscle disorder of the cavernosal bodies of the penis, with naked DNA gene transfer therapy. By inserting the hSlo gene, which codes for Maxipotassium channels, into smooth muscle cells, we can improve smooth muscle relaxation in the corporal bodies and thus improve erectile function. This method of gene transfer has proven to be safe and effective for erectile dysfunction, and human trials are ongoing.
Laparoscopic vs open partial nephrectomy in consecutive patients: the Cornell experience. - BJU international
To compare a contemporary series of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) and open partial nephrectomy (OPN) at one institution, to evaluate the size and types of tumour in each group and the early outcome after each procedure, as LPN is replacing open radical nephrectomy as the standard of care for uncomplicated renal tumours but partial nephrectomy remains significantly more difficult laparoscopically, especially if the goal is to duplicate the open surgical technique.We retrospectively analysed the records of all patients who underwent partial nephrectomy at our institution from January 2000 to April 2004, identifying 66 who had LPN and compared them with 59 who had OPN (mean age at LPN and OPN, 62.1 and 64.2 years, respectively; 70% men in each group). Variables analysed included operative time, blood loss, creatinine levels before and after partial nephrectomy, time to resuming clear liquids and regular diet, length of stay, tumour size, tumour pathological type and complications. Groups were compared using Student's t-test, with P < 0.05 taken to indicate significance.Of those having LPN, 59% had right-sided tumours, vs 53% in the OPN group; the respective mean tumour size was 2.2 and 3.4 cm, the mean operative duration 144 and 239 min (both P < 0.001), and the mean estimated blood loss 236 and 363 mL (P = 0.09). Seven patients in the OPN group had obligatory partial nephrectomy for either a solitary kidney (two) or azotaemia (five). No patient in the LPN group required an obligatory partial nephrectomy. Serum creatinine levels were measured before and 1 and 2 days after surgery, and were 88, 88 and 97 micromol/L for the LPN group, and 97, 106 and 106 micromol/L for the OPN group. Clear fluids were started a mean of 41 h after surgery, a regular diet resumed 76 h after and discharge was 129 h after surgery in the OPN group; the respective values for the LPN group were 24 h (P = 0.01), 49 h (P = 0.2) and 82 h (P < 0.001). Complications were similar in both groups but the pathological subtypes differed.LPN offers early functional advantages over OPN in terms of earlier resumption of diet and slightly earlier discharge. However, the two groups of patients were clearly not evenly matched for size nor pathological subtypes, with larger, malignant subtypes more predominant in the OPN group. These results suggest that while LPN is a safe, effective treatment for small renal tumours, obligatory partial nephrectomy or large tumours continue to be performed using open techniques with good results.

Map & Directions

1120 Park Ave New York, NY 10128
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