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Dr. Rickey  Wilson  Md image

Dr. Rickey Wilson Md

1401 W Central Park Ave
Davenport IA 52804
563 211-1785
Medical School: University Of Iowa College Of Medicine - 1980
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1588694012
Taxonomy Codes:
2084P0800X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Rickey Wilson is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$428.08 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$124.86
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$256.46 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$65.79
HCPCS Code:99221 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$279.58 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$92.00
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$226.79 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.06
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$126.28 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$36.00

HCPCS Code Definitions

99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99221
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1225097843
Psychiatry
356
1912991944
Psychiatry
354
1912985532
Internal Medicine
138
1912991340
Psychiatry
132
1316926264
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
100
1679552517
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
60
1396705711
Diagnostic Radiology
58
1649276437
Psychiatry
58
1902801525
Internal Medicine
49
1619956547
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
40
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Wilson has made to other doctors

Publications

Comparison of flowrates and voided volumes during non-instrumented uroflowmetry and pressure-flow studies in women with stress incontinence. - Neurourology and urodynamics
The Blaivas-Groutz nomogram defines voiding obstruction in women using Qmax from the NIF and the maximum detrusor pressure (Pdetmax ) from the PFS. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between NIF and PFS maximum flow rates in women with stress incontinence.We analyzed the UDS of 597 women with stress-dominant urinary incontinence. Each subject underwent a NIF and then a PFS. Mixed model was used to test the hypothesis that the relationship between flow rates and voided volume (VV) were similar for NIF and PFS.There were 452 subjects with both NIF and PFS studies that met the inclusion criteria and had max flow rate (Qmax ) for both NIF and PFS. The mean age was 53. Overall, higher VV were observed during PFS compared to NIF and subjects had higher Qmax with NIF compared to PFS. The relationship between Qmax and VV was significantly different between NIF and PFS (P < 0.004). At 200 ml, NIF Qmax was 14% higher than PFS Qmax and this difference increased to 30% at 700 ml.The difference between PFS Qmax and NIF Qmax increases as VV increase. As a result, values from PFS and NIF cannot be used interchangeably as has been suggested in the Blaivas-Groutz nomogram for obstruction in women.© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Sexual activity and function in women more than 2 years after midurethral sling placement. - American journal of obstetrics and gynecology
The purpose of this study was to assess prospectively the effects of midurethral sling surgery on sexual function and activity.Sexual activity and function was assessed in 597 women with stress urinary incontinence who were enrolled in a randomized equivalence trial of retropubic compared with transobturator midurethral slings. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess changes in Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire scores over a 2-year period.Significant, similar improvements in sexual function were seen in both midurethral sling groups. Mean Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire scores increased from 32.8 at baseline to 37.6 at 6 months and 37.3 at 24 months (P < .0001). Dyspareunia, incontinence during sex, and fear of incontinence during sex each significantly improved after surgery. Preoperative urge incontinence was associated with abstinence after surgery (P = .02); postoperative urge incontinence negatively impacted sexual function (P = .047).Midurethral sling surgery for stress urinary incontinence significantly improves sexual function, although coexistent urge incontinence has a negative impact.Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
A randomized trial of urodynamic testing before stress-incontinence surgery. - The New England journal of medicine
Urodynamic studies are commonly performed in women before surgery for stress urinary incontinence, but there is no good evidence that they improve outcomes.We performed a multicenter, randomized, noninferiority trial involving women with uncomplicated, demonstrable stress urinary incontinence to compare outcomes after preoperative office evaluation and urodynamic tests or evaluation only. The primary outcome was treatment success at 12 months, defined as a reduction in the score on the Urogenital Distress Inventory of 70% or more and a response of "much better" or "very much better" on the Patient Global Impression of Improvement. The predetermined noninferiority margin was 11 percentage points.A total of 630 women were randomly assigned to undergo office evaluation with urodynamic tests or evaluation only (315 per group); the proportion in whom treatment was successful was 76.9% in the urodynamic-testing group versus 77.2% in the evaluation-only group (difference, -0.3 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, -7.5 to 6.9), which was consistent with noninferiority. There were no significant between-group differences in secondary measures of incontinence severity, quality of life, patient satisfaction, rates of positive provocative stress tests, voiding dysfunction, or adverse events. Women who underwent urodynamic tests were significantly less likely to receive a diagnosis of overactive bladder and more likely to receive a diagnosis of voiding-phase dysfunction, but these changes did not lead to significant between-group differences in treatment selection or outcomes.For women with uncomplicated, demonstrable stress urinary incontinence, preoperative office evaluation alone was not inferior to evaluation with urodynamic testing for outcomes at 1 year. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00803959.).
Perineal surface electromyography does not typically demonstrate expected relaxation during normal voiding. - Neurourology and urodynamics
To describe perineal surface patch electromyography (EMG) activity during urodynamics (UDS) and compare activity between filling and voiding phases and to assess for a relationship between preoperative EMG activity and postoperative voiding symptoms.655 women underwent standardized preoperative UDS that included perineal surface EMG prior to undergoing surgery for stress urinary incontinence. Pressure-flow studies were evaluated for abdominal straining and interrupted flow. Quantitative EMG values were extracted from 10 predetermined time-points and compared between fill and void. Qualitative EMG activity was assessed for the percent of time EMG was active during fill and void and for the average amplitude of EMG during fill compared to void. Postoperative voiding dysfunction was defined as surgical revision or catheterization more than 6 weeks after surgery. Fisher's exact test with a 5% two-sided significance level was used to assess differences in EMG activity and postoperative voiding dysfunction.321 UDS had interpretable EMG studies, of which 131 (41%) had EMG values at all 10 predetermined and annotated time-points. Quantitative and qualitative EMG signals during flow were usually greater than during fill. The prevalence of postoperative voiding dysfunction in subjects with higher preoperative EMG activity during void was not significantly different. Results were similar in the 42 subjects who had neither abdominal straining during void nor interrupted flow.Perineal surface patch EMG did not measure expected pelvic floor and urethral sphincter relaxation during voiding. Preoperative EMG did not predict patients at risk for postoperative voiding dysfunction.Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Preoperative voiding detrusor pressures do not predict stress incontinence surgery outcomes. - International urogynecology journal
The aim of this study was to determine whether preoperative voiding detrusor pressures were associated with postoperative outcomes after stress incontinence surgery.Opening detrusor pressure, detrusor pressure at maximum flow (p (det) Q(max)), and closing detrusor pressure were assessed from 280 valid preoperative urodynamic studies in subjects without advanced prolapse from a multicenter randomized trial comparing Burch and autologous fascia sling procedures. These pressures were compared between subjects with and without overall success, stress-specific success, postoperative detrusor overactivity, and postoperative urge incontinence using independent sample t tests.There were no clinically or statistically significant differences in mean preoperative voiding detrusor pressures in any comparison of postoperative outcomes.We found no evidence that preoperative voiding detrusor pressures predict outcomes in women with stress predominant urinary incontinence undergoing Burch or autologous fascial sling procedures.

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1401 W Central Park Ave Davenport, IA 52804
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