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Dr. Peter  Ly  Md image

Dr. Peter Ly Md

8016 2Nd St
Downey CA 90241
562 627-7744
Medical School: New York Medical College - 1996
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: A65780
NPI: 1588684724
Taxonomy Codes:
207L00000X 208VP0014X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Peter Ly is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:62311 Description:Inject spine l/s (cd) Average Price:$1,368.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.09
HCPCS Code:64483 Description:Inj foramen epidural l/s Average Price:$1,393.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$117.13
HCPCS Code:64493 Description:Inj paravert f jnt l/s 1 lev Average Price:$1,245.92 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$108.59
HCPCS Code:64491 Description:Inj paravert f jnt c/t 2 lev Average Price:$1,194.44 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$74.37
HCPCS Code:64490 Description:Inj paravert f jnt c/t 1 lev Average Price:$1,235.33 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$128.19
HCPCS Code:64484 Description:Inj foramen epidural add-on Average Price:$829.03 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$55.52
HCPCS Code:64494 Description:Inj paravert f jnt l/s 2 lev Average Price:$728.33 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.08
HCPCS Code:64495 Description:Inj paravert f jnt l/s 3 lev Average Price:$722.40 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.79
HCPCS Code:01400 Description:Anesth knee joint surgery Average Price:$715.56 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$184.49
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$589.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$109.31
HCPCS Code:01992 Description:Anesth n block/inj prone Average Price:$610.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$154.37
HCPCS Code:00740 Description:Anesth upper gi visualize Average Price:$607.06 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$152.33
HCPCS Code:20610 Description:Drain/inject joint/bursa Average Price:$457.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.96
HCPCS Code:01810 Description:Anesth lower arm surgery Average Price:$566.67 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$143.35
HCPCS Code:72040 Description:X-ray exam of neck spine Average Price:$348.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.55
HCPCS Code:72291 Description:Perq verte/sacroplsty fluor Average Price:$388.31 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$71.31
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$470.53 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$164.99
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$250.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$73.70
HCPCS Code:72100 Description:X-ray exam of lower spine Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.54

HCPCS Code Definitions

99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
64483
Injection(s), anesthetic agent and/or steroid, transforaminal epidural, with imaging guidance (fluoroscopy or CT); lumbar or sacral, single level
20610
Arthrocentesis, aspiration and/or injection; major joint or bursa (eg, shoulder, hip, knee joint, subacromial bursa)
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
62311
Injection(s), of diagnostic or therapeutic substance(s) (including anesthetic, antispasmodic, opioid, steroid, other solution), not including neurolytic substances, including needle or catheter placement, includes contrast for localization when performed, epidural or subarachnoid; lumbar or sacral (caudal)
64493
Injection(s), diagnostic or therapeutic agent, paravertebral facet (zygapophyseal) joint (or nerves innervating that joint) with image guidance (fluoroscopy or CT), lumbar or sacral; single level
72100
Radiologic examination, spine, lumbosacral; 2 or 3 views
64491
Injection(s), diagnostic or therapeutic agent, paravertebral facet (zygapophyseal) joint (or nerves innervating that joint) with image guidance (fluoroscopy or CT), cervical or thoracic; second level (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
64484
Injection(s), anesthetic agent and/or steroid, transforaminal epidural, with imaging guidance (fluoroscopy or CT); lumbar or sacral, each additional level (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
64490
Injection(s), diagnostic or therapeutic agent, paravertebral facet (zygapophyseal) joint (or nerves innervating that joint) with image guidance (fluoroscopy or CT), cervical or thoracic; single level
72040
Radiologic examination, spine, cervical; 2 or 3 views
64495
Injection(s), diagnostic or therapeutic agent, paravertebral facet (zygapophyseal) joint (or nerves innervating that joint) with image guidance (fluoroscopy or CT), lumbar or sacral; third and any additional level(s) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
64494
Injection(s), diagnostic or therapeutic agent, paravertebral facet (zygapophyseal) joint (or nerves innervating that joint) with image guidance (fluoroscopy or CT), lumbar or sacral; second level (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1023124054
Internal Medicine
2,712
1275561284
Anesthesiology
1,472
1467440883
Pain Management
677
1366578049
Ophthalmology
574
1477564607
Pain Management
523
1720005259
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
512
1922049394
Diagnostic Radiology
429
1558458364
Ophthalmology
375
1518074731
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
229
1548217169
Diagnostic Radiology
193
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Ly has made to other doctors

Publications

MYC Is a Major Determinant of Mitotic Cell Fate. - Cancer cell
Taxol and other antimitotic agents are frontline chemotherapy agents but the mechanisms responsible for patient benefit remain unclear. Following a genome-wide siRNA screen, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor Myc as a taxol sensitizer. Using time-lapse imaging to correlate mitotic behavior with cell fate, we show that Myc sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers and agents that accelerate mitotic progression. Myc achieves this by upregulating a cluster of redundant pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins and suppressing pro-survival Bcl-xL. Gene expression analysis of breast cancers indicates that taxane responses correlate positively with Myc and negatively with Bcl-xL. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of Bcl-xL restores apoptosis in Myc-deficient cells. These results open up opportunities for biomarkers and combination therapies that could enhance traditional and second-generation antimitotic agents.Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
DNA Sequence-Specific Binding of CENP-B Enhances the Fidelity of Human Centromere Function. - Developmental cell
Human centromeres are specified by a stably inherited epigenetic mark that maintains centromere position and function through a two-step mechanism relying on self-templating centromeric chromatin assembled with the histone H3 variant CENP-A, followed by CENP-A-dependent nucleation of kinetochore assembly. Nevertheless, natural human centromeres are positioned within specific megabase chromosomal regions containing α-satellite DNA repeats, which contain binding sites for the DNA sequence-specific binding protein CENP-B. We now demonstrate that CENP-B directly binds both CENP-A's amino-terminal tail and CENP-C, a key nucleator of kinetochore assembly. DNA sequence-dependent binding of CENP-B within α-satellite repeats is required to stabilize optimal centromeric levels of CENP-C. Chromosomes bearing centromeres without bound CENP-B, including the human Y chromosome, are shown to mis-segregate in cells at rates several-fold higher than chromosomes with CENP-B-containing centromeres. These data demonstrate a DNA sequence-specific enhancement by CENP-B of the fidelity of epigenetically defined human centromere function.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Cavin-3 dictates the balance between ERK and Akt signaling. - eLife
Cavin-3 is a tumor suppressor protein of unknown function. Using both in vivo and in vitro approaches, we show that cavin-3 dictates the balance between ERK and Akt signaling. Loss of cavin-3 increases Akt signaling at the expense of ERK, while gain of cavin-3 increases ERK signaling at the expense Akt. Cavin-3 facilitates signal transduction to ERK by anchoring caveolae to the membrane skeleton of the plasma membrane via myosin-1c. Caveolae are lipid raft specializations that contain an ERK activation module and loss of the cavin-3 linkage reduces the abundance of caveolae, thereby separating this ERK activation module from signaling receptors. Loss of cavin-3 promotes Akt signaling through suppression of EGR1 and PTEN. The in vitro consequences of the loss of cavin-3 include induction of Warburg metabolism (aerobic glycolysis), accelerated cell proliferation, and resistance to apoptosis. The in vivo consequences of cavin-3 knockout are increased lactate production and cachexia. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00905.001.
Mitigation of radiation-induced damage by targeting EGFR in noncancerous human epithelial cells. - Radiation research
Methyl-2-cyano-3,12 dioxoolean-1,9 diene-28-oate (CDDO-Me) is an antioxidative, anti-inflammatory modulator, which activates the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway. While CDDO-Me has radioprotective activity through Nrf2 activation in vitro and in vivo, its ability to mitigate radiation-induced damage when provided after irradiation has not been studied. Here we investigated whether CDDO-Me mitigates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA damage in immortalized normal human colonic epithelial cells (HCECs) and bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). DNA damage and clonogenic survival were assessed after treatment with CDDO-Me postirradiation. We observed that treatment with CDDO-Me within 30 min after irradiation improved both DNA damage repair and clonogenic survival independently of Nrf2. CDDO-Me activates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) related DNA repair responses. In the presence of CDDO-Me, EGFR is phosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus where it interacts with DNA-PKcs. CDDO-Me-mediated mitigation activity can be abrogated through depletion of EGFR, ectopic overexpression of mutant EGFR or inhibition of DNA-PKcs. While post-treatment of CDDO-Me protected noncancerous HCECs and HBECs against IR, cancer cells (HCT116 and MCF7) were not protected by CDDO-Me. These results suggest that targeting EGFR using CDDO-Me is a promising radiation mitigator with potential utility for first responders to nuclear accidents.
Targeting of Nrf2 induces DNA damage signaling and protects colonic epithelial cells from ionizing radiation. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcriptional regulator for antioxidant and anti-inflammation enzymes that binds to its endogenous inhibitor protein, Kelch-like ECH (erythroid cell-derived protein with CNC homology)-associated protein 1, in the cytoplasm under normal conditions. Various endogenous or environmental oxidative stresses, such as ionizing radiation (IR), can disrupt the Nrf2-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 complex. This allows Nrf2 to translocate from the cytoplasm into the nucleus to induce transcription of heme oxygenase-1 and other cytoprotective enzymes through binding to antioxidant responsive elements. However, how Nrf2 protects cells from IR-induced damage remains unclear. Here, we report that Nrf2 activation by the synthetic triterpenoids, bardoxolone methyl (BARD) and 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9 (11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide, protects colonic epithelial cells against IR-induced damage, in part, by enhancing signaling of the DNA damage response. Pretreatment with BARD reduced the frequency of both G1 and S/G2 chromosome aberrations and enhanced the disappearance of repairosomes (C-terminal binding protein interacting protein, Rad51, and p53 binding protein-1 foci) after IR. BARD protected cells from IR toxicity in a Nrf2-dependent manner. The p53 binding protein-1 promoter contains three antioxidant responsive elements in which Nrf2 directly binds following BARD treatment. In addition, 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9 (11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide provided before exposure to a lethal dose of whole-body irradiation protected WT mice from DNA damage and acute gastrointestinal toxicity, which resulted in improved overall survival. These results demonstrate that Nrf2 activation by synthetic triterpenoids is a promising candidate target to protect the gastrointestinal tract against acute IR in vitro and in vivo.
Functional parsing of driver mutations in the colorectal cancer genome reveals numerous suppressors of anchorage-independent growth. - Cancer research
Landmark cancer genome resequencing efforts are leading to the identification of mutated genes in many types of cancer. The extreme diversity of mutations being detected presents significant challenges to subdivide causal from coincidental mutations to elucidate how disrupted regulatory networks drive cancer processes. Given that a common early perturbation in solid tumor initiation is bypass of matrix-dependent proliferation restraints, we sought to functionally interrogate colorectal cancer candidate genes (CAN-genes) to identify driver tumor suppressors. We have employed an isogenic human colonic epithelial cell (HCEC) model to identify suppressors of anchorage-independent growth by conducting a soft agar-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen within the cohort of CAN-genes. Remarkably, depletion of 65 of the 151 CAN-genes tested collaborated with ectopic expression of K-RAS(V12) and/or TP53 knockdown to promote anchorage-independent proliferation of HCECs. In contrast, only 5 of 362 random shRNAs (1.4%) enhanced soft agar growth. We have identified additional members of an extensive gene network specifying matrix-dependent proliferation, by constructing an interaction map of these confirmed progression suppressors with approximately 700 mutated genes that were excluded from CAN-genes, and experimentally verifying soft agar growth enhancement in response to depletion of a subset of these genes. Collectively, this study revealed a profound diversity of nodes within a fundamental tumor suppressor network that are susceptible to perturbation leading to enhanced cell-autonomous anchorage-independent proliferative fitness. Tumor suppressor network fragility as a paradigm within this and other regulatory systems perturbed in cancer could, in large part, account for the heterogeneity of somatic mutations detected in tumors.©2011 AACR.
Characterization of aneuploid populations with trisomy 7 and 20 derived from diploid human colonic epithelial cells. - Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)
Chromosomal instability leading to aneuploidy occurs in most sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs) and is believed to be an early driving force in disease progression. Despite this observation, the cellular advantages conferred by these cytogenetic alterations are poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that serum-free passage of originally diploid, immortalized human colonic epithelial cells (HCECs) gave rise to the acquisition of trisomy 7 (+7), an aneuploidy detected in more than 40% of colorectal adenomas. These cells remain diploid under long-term growth in 2% serum conditions. Analysis by GTG banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization detected no rare preexisting +7 cell in the original population, suggesting a conversion of diploid cells to an aneuploid state. The acquisition of +7 also precedes loss or truncation of the adenomatosis polyposis coli gene as both diploid and +7 cells express full-length, functional protein. Coculturing of fluorescent-labeled cells demonstrate that +7 HCECs have a growth advantage over diploid cells in serum-free conditions. Defects in cell migration and aberrant regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, located on chromosome 7p, are also detected in +7 HCECs. Interestingly, knockdown of TP53 and expression of K-Ras(V12) in +7 HCECs resulted in the emergence of trisomy 20, another nonrandom aneuploidy observed in ∼85% of CRC. In summary, we describe isogenic colonic epithelial cells that represent cytogenetic changes occurring frequently in sporadic CRC. The emergence and characterization of trisomy 7 and 20 demonstrate that these HCECs may serve as unique human cell-based models to examine the effects of chromosomal instability in CRC progression.
The remission of post-transplant nephrotic syndrome clinicopathologic characterization. - American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
Among 67 renal transplant recipients with nephrotic syndrome (NS), nine episodes were reversible in eight patients. Biopsies showed minimal-change disease, focal segmental membranous glomerulonephritis and acute glomerulitis, IgA nephropathy and acute glomerulitis or thrombotic microangiopathy, and chronic transplant nephropathy with or without acute glomerulitis. NS developed 1-4 months post transplant in the four patients with minimal-change disease, but later (33-151 months) in the others. At onset, serum creatinine was normal or elevated. Treatment included calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, or both, together with routine antirejection therapy. Remission was achieved 4-12 months after onset, when renal function remained normal in four, improved in four, and worsened in one. At last follow-up, six patients still had remission and functional grafts. One lost graft to chronic transplant nephropathy while NS remained in remission. In the remaining patient, proteinuria, which was due to chronic transplant glomerulopathy unrelated to the initial minimal-change disease-associated NS, recurred 50 months post transplant. Remission of post-transplant NS is possible. It is often associated with minimal-change diseases and less frequently with other glomerular lesions, including acute glomerulitis. Reversible post-transplant NS does not have an adverse effect on the renal allografts.
De novo minimal change disease associated with reversible post-transplant nephrotic syndrome. A report of five cases and review of literature. - Clinical transplantation
Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is frequent in renal transplant recipients and may be related to a large variety of glomerular lesions. In some of these cases, the transplant biopsy showed no significant glomerular changes and the NS was reversible, but the primary renal disease was not minimal change disease (MCD), suggesting that MCD may develop de novo in renal transplant setting. Knowledge of this entity, however, is limited. Among 67 cases of post-transplant NS encountered in a 12-yr period, five were found to be associated with de novo MCD. A critical review of the literature revealed nine additional cases of de novo MCD. The data from these 14 cases show that patients with de novo MCD had a large variety of primary renal diseases but MCD or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was not among them. Eight of the 14 transplanted kidneys (60%) were from living related donors, suggesting this as a risk factor. Nephrotic range proteinuria (3-76 g/d) developed immediately or shortly after transplantation (within 4 months for all reported cases, except for one at 24 months). The serum creatinine when NS was first diagnosed was normal or mildly elevated, but acute renal failure occurred in three patients. On biopsy, the glomeruli were normal or, more frequently, displayed mild, focal segmental mesangial sclerosis, hypercellularity, deposition of IgM/C3, or accumulation of mononuclear inflammatory cells in some glomerular capillaries. The tubulointerstitial compartment was normal in cases with normal renal function; displayed mild acute and/or chronic rejection that correlated with a mildly elevated serum creatinine; or showed acute changes including acute rejection, acute tubular necrosis, or acute cyclosporin A toxicity, which accounted for both acute renal failure at presentation and its subsequent reversibility. Under various treatments, including increased steroids, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor blockers, sustained remission of NS was achieved in 13 cases, within a year (0.5-12 months) in 10 and later (24, 34 and 98 months, respectively) in three. In the remaining case, the patient died of septic shock 2 months after transplantation. After remission of the NS, the grafts functioned well without or with minimal proteinuria for several years. De novo MCD has characteristic clinical and pathologic features. It represents an important but hitherto underemphasized cause of post-transplant NS, which is potentially reversible and does not adversely affect the renal transplants.
CENP-A Is Dispensable for Mitotic Centromere Function after Initial Centromere/Kinetochore Assembly. - Cell reports
Human centromeres are defined by chromatin containing the histone H3 variant CENP-A assembled onto repetitive alphoid DNA sequences. By inducing rapid, complete degradation of endogenous CENP-A, we now demonstrate that once the first steps of centromere assembly have been completed in G1/S, continued CENP-A binding is not required for maintaining kinetochore attachment to centromeres or for centromere function in the next mitosis. Degradation of CENP-A prior to kinetochore assembly is found to block deposition of CENP-C and CENP-N, but not CENP-T, thereby producing defective kinetochores and failure of chromosome segregation. Without the continuing presence of CENP-A, CENP-B binding to alphoid DNA sequences becomes essential to preserve anchoring of CENP-C and the kinetochore to each centromere. Thus, there is a reciprocal interdependency of CENP-A chromatin and the underlying repetitive centromere DNA sequences bound by CENP-B in the maintenance of human chromosome segregation.Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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8016 2Nd St Downey, CA 90241
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