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Dr. Joyce  Martin  Pa image

Dr. Joyce Martin Pa

127 Mcclanahan Street Suite 300
Roanoke VA 24014
540 828-8204
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 0110001995
NPI: 1578653713
Taxonomy Codes:
207RC0000X

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Publications

Births: Final Data for 2014. - National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System
This report presents 2014 data on U.S. births according to a wide variety of characteristics. Data are presented for maternal age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, attendant at birth, method of delivery, period of gestation, birthweight, and plurality. Birth and fertility rates are presented by age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, and marital status. Selected data by mother's state of residence and birth rates by age and race of father also are shown. Trends in fertility patterns and maternal and infant characteristics are described and interpreted.All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
Births in the United States, 2014. - NCHS data brief
For the first year since 2007, childbearing rose in the United States in 2014, albeit slightly. Trends differed by race and Hispanic origin, with the GFR up among non-Hispanic white and API women but down or unchanged among other groups for 2013–2014. Historical lows in teen childbearing were seen in the U.S. overall in 2014, and for each of the race and Hispanic origin groups. Following years of steady increases that totaled nearly 60% (3), the U.S. cesarean delivery rate declined for the second straight year. Cesarean delivery rates had been on the decline for several years for non-Hispanic white and API women, but 2014 marks the first year of decline in cesarean deliveries among non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women. Preterm birth rates continued to trend downward in 2014 (2), overall and among most race and Hispanic origin groups, but large differences among groups in the risk of preterm birth were observed. The forthcoming report, "Births: Final data for 2014" (4), will present more information on the topics addressed in this report and selected others.All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
Births: Preliminary Data for 2014. - National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System
Objectives-This report presents preliminary 2014 data on U.S. births. Births are shown by age, live-birth order, race, and Hispanic origin of mother. Data on marital status, cesarean delivery, preterm births, and low birthweight are also presented.All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
Measuring Gestational Age in Vital Statistics Data: Transitioning to the Obstetric Estimate. - National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System
Beginning with the 2014 data year, the National Center for Health Statistics is transitioning to a new standard for estimating the gestational age of a newborn. The new measure, the obstetric estimate of gestation at delivery (OE), replaces the measure based on the date of the last normal menses (LMP). This transition is being made because of increasing evidence of the greater validity of the OE compared with the LMP-based measure. This report describes the relationship between the two measures. Agreement between the two measures is shown for 2013. Comparisons between the two measures for single gestational weeks and selected gestational age categories for 2013, and trends in the two measures for 2007-2013 by gestational category, focusing on preterm births, are shown for the United States and by race and Hispanic origin and state.All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
Births: final data for 2013. - National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System
This report presents 2013 data on U.S. births according to a wide variety of characteristics. Data are presented for maternal age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, attendant at birth, method of delivery, period of gestation, birthweight, and plurality. Birth and fertility rates are presented by age, live-birth order, race and Hispanic origin, and marital status. Selected data by mother's state of residence and birth rates by age and race of father also are shown. Trends in fertility patterns and maternal and infant characteristics are described and interpreted.Descriptive tabulations of data reported on the birth certificates of the 3.93 million U.S. births that occurred in 2013 are presented.A total of 3,932,181 births were registered in the United States in 2013, down less than 1% from 2012. The general fertility rate declined to 62.5 per 1,000 women aged 15-44. The teen birth rate fell 10%, to 26.5 per 1,000 women aged 15-19. Birth rates declined for women in their 20s and increased for most age groups of women aged 30 and over. The total fertility rate (estimated number of births over a woman's lifetime) declined 1% to 1,857.5 per 1,000 women. Measures of unmarried childbearing were down in 2013 from 2012. The cesarean delivery rate declined to 32.7%. The preterm birth rate declined for the seventh straight year to 11.39%, but the low birthweight rate was essentially unchanged at 8.02%. The twin birth rate rose 2% to 33.7 per 1,000 births; the triplet and higher-order multiple birth rate dropped 4% to 119.5 per 100,000 total births.All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
Births resulting from assisted reproductive technology: comparing birth certificate and National ART Surveillance System Data, 2011. - National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System
This report compares data on births resulting from assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures from 2011 birth certificates with data from the 2011 National ART Surveillance System (NASS) among the subset of jurisdictions that adopted the 2003 revised birth certificate as of January 1, 2011, with information on ART.Birth certificate data are based on 100% of births registered in 27 states and the District of Columbia. NASS data included all ART cycles initiated in 2010 or 2011 for which a live birth in 2011 was reported. The same reporting area was used for both data sources and represents 67% of all births in the United States in 2011. A ratio was computed by dividing the percentage of births resulting from ART procedures for NASS data by the percentage for birth certificate data. A ratio of 1.0 represents equivalent levels of reporting. Because this reporting area is not a random sample of births, the results are not generalizable to the United States as a whole.Overall, the percentage of births resulting from ART procedures was 2.06 times higher for NASS data (1.44%) compared with birth certificate data (0.70%). The ratio for each jurisdiction varied from 1.04 for Utah and Wisconsin to 7.50 for Florida. Higher-risk groups had more consistent reporting. between data sources [e.g., triplet or higher-order multiples (1.36) compared with singletons (2.11)].Births resulting from ART procedures appear to be underreported on the birth certificate; however, the magnitude of underreporting varied by jurisdiction and maternal-infant health characteristics.
Births in the United States, 2013. - NCHS data brief
Childbearing is on the decline in the United States overall and among women under age 30 and women in each of the largest race and Hispanic origin groups. Childbearing continues to rise among older women, however, with rates for women aged 35 and over at the highest levels seen in approximately 50 years. After more than a decade of steady rises, cesarean delivery rates are trending slightly downward; a recent report revealed larger declines for 2009-2013 among women at low risk for cesarean delivery than for all women with cesareans. Following several years of relative stability, twinning rates were up for 2013; a recent report based on 2012 data revealed that triplet and higher-order multiple births have been trending sharply downward. Declines in the incidence of preterm deliveries, especially in conjunction with reductions in low birthweight (albeit modest) and in perinatal mortality, suggest some recent progress in improving pregnancy outcome in the United States. The forthcoming report "Births: Final Data for 2013" will present more information on the topics addressed in this report and selected others.All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
Trends in fetal and perinatal mortality in the United States, 2006-2012. - NCHS data brief
Total, early, and late fetal mortality rates were generally flat in the United States from 2006 through 2012. Over this same period, fetal mortality rates were also essentially unchanged among each of the three largest race and Hispanic origin groups: non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic women. The perinatal mortality rate declined 4% from 2006 through 2011, a result of a decrease in early neonatal mortality. The perinatal mortality rate fell 8% for non- Hispanic black women; declines among non-Hispanic white and Hispanic women were not statistically significant. The continued decline in the perinatal mortality rate is noteworthy. The rate is down 10% since 2000 (4), and the pace of decline for the most current period, 2006–2011, is consistent with that for 2000–2005. The U.S. fetal mortality rate, however, did not improve during 2006–2012.All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
Trends in low-risk cesarean delivery in the United States, 1990-2013. - National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System
This report describes trends in low-risk cesarean delivery rates in the United States from 1990 through 2013. Trends in low-risk cesarean delivery by state of residence, gestational age, age of mother, and race and Hispanic origin of mother are examined.Low-risk cesarean delivery is defined as a cesarean delivery among term (37 or more completed weeks), singleton, vertex (head first) births to women giving birth for the first time. Data for 1990-2012 are based on 100% of low-risk births to residents of all states and the District of Columbia. Data for 2013 are preliminary, and are based on nearly 100% of low-risk births in the United States.The low-risk cesarean delivery rate reached a low of 18.4% in 1997 and then rose steadily to a high of 28.1% in 2009. The rate decreased from 2009 through 2013, reaching 26.9%. Declines were widespread during this time. Low-risk cesarean delivery rates were down for more than one-half of states. Rates declined for all term gestational ages (37 or more completed weeks); the largest decline was at 38 weeks, down 9%. Rates for all maternal age groups and race and Hispanic origin groups were also down. The largest declines were for women under 40 (6%-8%) and for non-Hispanic white women (6%); rates for these groups decreased at all term gestational ages.All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.
Assessing the quality of medical and health data from the 2003 birth certificate revision: results from two states. - National vital statistics reports : from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System
A primary goal of the 2003 revision of the U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth was to improve data quality, in part by improving data sources, definitions, and instructions. This report evaluates the quality of selected medical and health data from the 2003 revision of the birth certificate by comparing birth certificate data with information abstracted from hospital medical records.A random sample of records for 600 births that occurred in 2010-2011 in State A, and a convenience sample of 495 births that occurred in State B in 2009 were reviewed. Birth certificate and hospital medical record data were compared for these categories: pregnancy history, prenatal care, gestational age, birthweight, pregnancy risk factors, obstetric procedures, onset of labor, source of payment, characteristics of labor and delivery, fetal presentation, method of delivery, abnormal conditions of the newborn, infant living, and infant breastfed. Levels of missing data, exact agreement, kappa scores, sensitivity, and false discovery rates are presented, where applicable.Exact agreement or sensitivity, was high for a number of items for both states (e.g., number of cesarean deliveries, cephalic presentation, cesarean delivery, and birthweight within 500 grams), but exact agreement or sensitivity was low or extremely low for both states for several items (e.g., total number of prenatal visits, previous preterm birth, meconium staining, and fetal intolerance of labor) (Figure 1). Levels of agreement or sensitivity for most items (e.g., prenatal care beginning in first trimester and source of payment-private insurance) were substantial or moderate. Data quality varied by state, and often, varied widely by hospital.

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127 Mcclanahan Street Suite 300 Roanoke, VA 24014
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