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Dr. Thomas  Strobel  Md image

Dr. Thomas Strobel Md

1221 Highland Ave
Clarkston WA 99403
208 995-5522
Medical School: Mayo Medical School - 1987
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1578581740
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Thomas Strobel is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$357.52 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$184.34
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$261.38 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$126.95
HCPCS Code:99221 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$186.57 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$94.43
HCPCS Code:99217 Description:Observation care discharge Average Price:$146.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.51
HCPCS Code:99219 Description:Initial observation care Average Price:$200.78 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$123.63
HCPCS Code:99239 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$167.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.66
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$132.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.92
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$130.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.31
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$80.23 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$36.46

HCPCS Code Definitions

99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99239
Hospital discharge day management; more than 30 minutes
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99221
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99217
Observation care discharge day management (This code is to be utilized to report all services provided to a patient on discharge from "observation status" if the discharge is on other than the initial date of "observation status." To report services to a patient designated as "observation status" or "inpatient status" and discharged on the same date, use the codes for Observation or Inpatient Care Services [including Admission and Discharge Services, 99234-99236 as appropriate.])
99219
Initial observation care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission to "observation status" are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1750465514
Diagnostic Radiology
1,973
1649228446
Diagnostic Radiology
1,652
1356312524
Diagnostic Radiology
1,172
1700983137
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,101
1063445385
Internal Medicine
834
1124023361
Internal Medicine
782
1497846091
Internal Medicine
669
1942232285
Internal Medicine
597
1376517268
Internal Medicine
491
1164536728
Internal Medicine
489
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Strobel has made to other doctors

Publications

A genome wide association study links glutamate receptor pathway to sporadic creutzfeldt-jakob disease risk. - PloS one
We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9) a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP); and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8) tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8). Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967). The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8) and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5) remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis.
Atypical sporadic CJD-MM phenotype with white matter kuru plaques associated with intranuclear inclusion body and argyrophilic grain disease. - Neuropathology : official journal of the Japanese Society of Neuropathology
We describe an atypical neuropathological phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 76-year-old man. The clinical symptoms were characterized by progressive dementia, gait ataxia, rigidity and urinary incontinence. The disease duration was 6 weeks. MRI did not show prominent atrophy or hyperintensities in cortical areas, striatum or thalamus. Biomarker examination of the cerebrospinal fluid deviated from that seen in pure Alzheimer's disease. Triphasic waves in the EEG were detected only later in the disease course, while 14-3-3 assay was positive. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity (MM) at codon 129. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes corresponding to the MM type 1 cases. However, a striking feature was the presence of abundant kuru-type plaques in the white matter. This rare morphology was associated with neuropathological signs of intranuclear inclusion body disease and advanced stage of argyrophilic grain disease. These alterations did not show correlation with each other, thus seemed to develop independently. This case further highlights the complexity of neuropathological alterations in the ageing brain.© 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.
I716F AβPP mutation associates with the deposition of oligomeric pyroglutamate amyloid-β and α-synucleinopathy with Lewy bodies. - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD
Autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with mutations in the AβPP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 genes. The clinical phenotype associated with AβPP mutations is mainly characterized by dementia or by strokes related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). We present a comprehensive clinical, neuropathological, genetic, and biochemical study on a patient affected by familial AD associated with the I716F mutation in the AβPP gene. The clinical phenotype was characterized by early age of onset of 47 years, and rapidly progressive cerebellar ataxia, myoclonic jerks, rigidity, and dementia reminiscent of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), followed by a prolonged persistent vegetative state. Neuropathological evaluation of the proband revealed AD-related pathology but also α-synucleinopathy compatible with dementia with Lewy bodies neocortical stage or Parkinson's disease corresponding to Braak stage 6. Tau-pathology in the form of neurofibrillary degeneration corresponded to stage VI according to the Braak classification. The severe Aβ pathology included CAA, numerous plaques, and deposition of N-truncated pyroglutamate-modified Aβ peptides. Remarkably, pyroglutamate Aβ oligomers were also present intracellularly in Purkinje cells corresponding to the ataxic phenotype. The detection of a CJD-like phenotype expands the spectrum of clinical presentations associated with familial AD. Our study supports the concept that the neuropathology of familial AD expands beyond the classical AD-related pathology as defined by plaques and tangles. Finally, we provide evidence for the first time that oligomeric pyroglutamate Aβ is present in a specific pattern correlating with the clinical symptoms of a patient with AβPP I716F mutation.
Rare mutations in SQSTM1 modify susceptibility to frontotemporal lobar degeneration. - Acta neuropathologica
Mutations in the gene coding for Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) have been genetically associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Paget disease of bone. In the present study, we analyzed the SQSTM1 coding sequence for mutations in an extended cohort of 1,808 patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), ascertained within the European Early-Onset Dementia consortium. As control dataset, we sequenced 1,625 European control individuals and analyzed whole-exome sequence data of 2,274 German individuals (total n = 3,899). Association of rare SQSTM1 mutations was calculated in a meta-analysis of 4,332 FTLD and 10,240 control alleles. We identified 25 coding variants in FTLD patients of which 10 have not been described. Fifteen mutations were absent in the control individuals (carrier frequency <0.00026) whilst the others were rare in both patients and control individuals. When pooling all variants with a minor allele frequency <0.01, an overall frequency of 3.2 % was calculated in patients. Rare variant association analysis between patients and controls showed no difference over the whole protein, but suggested that rare mutations clustering in the UBA domain of SQSTM1 may influence disease susceptibility by doubling the risk for FTLD (RR = 2.18 [95 % CI 1.24-3.85]; corrected p value = 0.042). Detailed histopathology demonstrated that mutations in SQSTM1 associate with widespread neuronal and glial phospho-TDP-43 pathology. With this study, we provide further evidence for a putative role of rare mutations in SQSTM1 in the genetic etiology of FTLD and showed that, comparable to other FTLD/ALS genes, SQSTM1 mutations are associated with TDP-43 pathology.
Rapidly progressive dementia with thalamic degeneration and peculiar cortical prion protein immunoreactivity, but absence of proteinase K resistant PrP: a new disease entity? - Acta neuropathologica communications
Human prion diseases are a group of rare fatal neurodegenerative conditions with well-developed clinical and neuropathological diagnostic criteria. Recent observations have expanded the spectrum of prion diseases beyond the classically recognized forms.In the present study we report six patients with a novel, apparently sporadic disease characterised by thalamic degeneration and rapidly progressive dementia (duration of illness 2-12 months; age at death: 55-81 years). Light and electron microscopic immunostaining for the prion protein (PrP) revealed a peculiar intraneuritic distribution in neocortical regions. Proteinase K resistant PrP (PrPres) was undetectable by Western blotting in frontal cortex from the three cases with frozen tissue, even after enrichment for PrPres by centrifugation or by phosphotungstic acid precipitation. Conformation-dependent immunoassay analysis using a range of PK digestion conditions (and no PK digestion) produced only very limited evidence of meaningful D-N (denatured/native) values, indicative of the presence of disease-associated PrP (PrPSc) in these cases, when the results were compared with appropriate negative control groups.Our observation expands the spectrum of conditions associated with rapidly progressive dementia and may have implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of prion diseases.
Essential role for mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease Ape1/Ref-1 in telomere maintenance. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease Ape1 is a multifunctional protein operating in protection of cells from oxidative stress via its DNA repair, redox, and transcription regulatory activities. The importance of Ape1 has been marked by previous work demonstrating its requirement for viability in mammalian cells. However, beyond a requirement for Ape1-dependent DNA repair activity, deeper molecular mechanisms of the fundamental role of Ape1 in cell survival have not been defined. Here, we report that Ape1 is an essential factor stabilizing telomeric DNA, and its deficiency is associated with telomere dysfunction and segregation defects in immortalized cells maintaining telomeres by either the alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway (U2OS) or telomerase expression (BJ-hTERT), or in normal human fibroblasts (IMR90). Through the expression of Ape1 derivatives with site-specific changes, we found that the DNA repair and N-terminal acetylation domains are required for the Ape1 function at telomeres. Ape1 associates with telomere proteins in U2OS cells, and Ape1 depletion causes dissociation of TRF2 protein from telomeres. Consistent with this effect, we also observed that Ape1 depletion caused telomere shortening in both BJ-hTERT and in HeLa cells. Thus, our study describes a unique and unpredicted role for Ape1 in telomere protection, providing a direct link between base excision DNA repair activities and telomere metabolism.
Cerebellar dysfunction in a family harboring the PSEN1 mutation co-segregating with a cathepsin D variant p.A58V. - Journal of the neurological sciences
Presenile dementia may be caused by a variety of different genetic conditions such as familial Alzheimer's disease, prion disease as well as several hereditary metabolic disorders including adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. We report a multigenerational family with autosomal dominant presenile dementia harboring a cerebellar phenotype. Longitudinal clinical work-up in affected family members revealed ataxia accompanied by progressive cognitive decline, rapid loss of global cognition, memory, visuospatial and frontal-executive functions accompanied by progressive motor deterioration and early death. Linkage analysis and exome sequencing identified the p.S170F mutation of Presenilin 1 in all affected individuals, which is known to be associated with very early onset Alzheimer's disease. Additional search for potentially modifying variants revealed in all affected individuals of the third generation a paternally inherited variant p.A58V (rs17571) of Cathepsin D which is considered an independent risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Involvement of cerebellar and brainstem structures leading to functional decortication in addition to rapid progressive presenile dementia in this PSEN1 family may therefore indicate an epistatic effect of the p.A58V Cathepsin D variant on the deleterious course of this disease.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Interlaboratory comparison of IDH mutation detection. - Journal of neuro-oncology
Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutational testing is becoming increasingly important. For this, robust and reliable assays are needed. We tested the variation of results between six laboratories of testing for IDH mutations. Each laboratory received five unstained slides from 31 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) glioma samples, and followed its own standard IDH diagnostic routine. All laboratories used immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an antibody against the most frequent IDH1 mutation (R132H) as a first step. Three laboratories then sequenced only IHC negative cases while the others sequenced all cases. Based on the overall analysis, 13 samples from 11 tumors had an R132H mutation and one tumor showed an R132G mutation. Results of IHC for IDH1 R132H mutations in all six laboratories were completely in agreement, and identified all R132H mutations. Upon sequencing the results of two laboratories deviated from those of the others. After a review of the entire diagnostic process, on repeat (blinded) testing one laboratory was completely in agreement with the overall result. A change in technique did only partially improve the results in the other laboratory. IHC for the IDH1 R132H mutation is very reliable and consistent across laboratories. IDH sequencing procedures yielded inconsistent results in 2 out of 6 laboratories. Quality assurance is pivotal before IDH testing is made part of clinical management of patients.
miR-1289 and "Zipcode"-like Sequence Enrich mRNAs in Microvesicles. - Molecular therapy. Nucleic acids
Despite intensive studies, the molecular mechanisms by which the genetic materials are uploaded into microvesicles (MVs) are still unknown. This is the first study describing a zipcode-like 25 nucleotide (nt) sequence in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of mRNAs, with variants of this sequence present in many mRNAs enriched in MVs, as compared to their glioblastoma cells of origin. When this sequence was incorporated into the 3'UTR of a reporter message and expressed in a different cell type, it led to enrichment of the reporter mRNA in MVs. Critical features of this sequence are both a CUGCC core presented on a stem-loop structure and a miRNA-binding site, with increased levels of the corresponding miRNA in cells further increasing levels of mRNAs in MVs.
A pan-European study of the C9orf72 repeat associated with FTLD: geographic prevalence, genomic instability, and intermediate repeats. - Human mutation
We assessed the geographical distribution of C9orf72 G(4) C(2) expansions in a pan-European frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) cohort (n = 1,205), ascertained by the European Early-Onset Dementia (EOD) consortium. Next, we performed a meta-analysis of our data and that of other European studies, together 2,668 patients from 15 Western European countries. The frequency of the C9orf72 expansions in Western Europe was 9.98% in overall FTLD, with 18.52% in familial, and 6.26% in sporadic FTLD patients. Outliers were Finland and Sweden with overall frequencies of respectively 29.33% and 20.73%, but also Spain with 25.49%. In contrast, prevalence in Germany was limited to 4.82%. In addition, we studied the role of intermediate repeats (7-24 repeat units), which are strongly correlated with the risk haplotype, on disease and C9orf72 expression. In vitro reporter gene expression studies demonstrated significantly decreased transcriptional activity of C9orf72 with increasing number of normal repeat units, indicating that intermediate repeats might act as predisposing alleles and in favor of the loss-of-function disease mechanism. Further, we observed a significantly increased frequency of short indels in the GC-rich low complexity sequence adjacent to the G(4) C(2) repeat in C9orf72 expansion carriers (P < 0.001) with the most common indel creating one long contiguous imperfect G(4) C(2) repeat, which is likely more prone to replication slippage and pathological expansion.© 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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