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Dr. Jakub  Svoboda  Md image

Dr. Jakub Svoboda Md

3400 Civic Center Boulevard Suite 2 West
Philadelphia PA 19104
215 155-5858
Medical School: Yale University School Of Medicine - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: MD422164
NPI: 1578580460
Taxonomy Codes:
207RH0003X 207RX0202X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Jakub Svoboda is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:38221 Description:Bone marrow biopsy Average Price:$305.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$77.60
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$307.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$204.50
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$72.55
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$248.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$170.91
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$176.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.17
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$167.89 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$111.87
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$119.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$79.60
HCPCS Code:G0364 Description:Bone marrow aspirate &biopsy Average Price:$29.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.23

HCPCS Code Definitions

99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
38221
Bone marrow; biopsy, needle or trocar
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
G0364
Bone marrow aspiration performed with bone marrow biopsy through the same incision on the same date of service

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1134157621
Pathology
1,098
1720144512
Radiation Oncology
826
1023053576
Pathology
750
1417983123
Cardiac Electrophysiology
740
1336180108
Hematology/Oncology
730
1336185180
Pathology
613
1255329959
Cardiac Electrophysiology
599
1588694632
Cardiac Electrophysiology
593
1376551770
Diagnostic Radiology
555
1639231509
Hematology/Oncology
512
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Svoboda has made to other doctors

Publications

Implementation of an Advanced Practice Provider Service on an Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Unit: Impact on Patient Outcomes. - Biology of blood and marrow transplantation : journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a complex medical procedure for some patients with hematologic malignancies. Most ASCTs occur at academic centers where either medical residents (house staff [HS]) or advanced practice providers (APPs) provide daily care. As a result of increasing work-hour regulations, APPs have assumed greater responsibilities, including those traditionally held by HS. In this study we evaluate ASCT patient outcomes by inpatient provider service. A retrospective, single-center chart review of ASCT patients was performed. ASCT patients admitted to an HS service from May 2011 to May 2012 (N = 86) were compared with ASCT patients admitted to a newly formed APP service from October 2012 to October 2013 (N = 81). As part of a secondary sensitivity analysis, we compared ASCT patients on the APP service to a subset of ASCT patients admitted to the HS service also from October 2012 to October 2013 (n = 27). Our primary outcomes were 100-day survival and relapse-free survival rates. Additional outcomes included length of stay (LOS), inpatient complications, and ordering behavior. Our primary pre- and post-analyses found no differences in 100-day overall survival and 100-day relapse-free survival rate between the services. The rate of pneumonia was lower on the APP service (15% versus 28%, P = .04), with no significant differences in other infectious complications. HS ordered more blood cultures (6.7 versus 4.2, P = .03) per patient than the APP service. There was no difference in LOS, readmission rates, or inpatient mortality. With regards to our secondary sensitivity analysis, no differences were found in 100-day overall survival and 100-day relapse-free survival rates between the services. There was a decreased LOS on the APP service (29.4 versus 37.2 days, P = .01). HS ordered more blood cultures (9.3 versus 4.2, P < .01) and more radiological films (8.1 versus 5.2, P = .05) per patient than the APP service. This increased ordering and LOS was associated with an increase in mean hospital charges on the HS service (P = .04). ASCT patients on an APP service had similar 100-day outcomes as those on the HS service. In the setting of limited resources, APPs are potential alternative providers for complex transplant inpatients.Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.
Front-line, dose-escalated immunochemotherapy is associated with a significant progression-free survival advantage in patients with double-hit lymphomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis. - British journal of haematology
'Double-hit lymphomas' (DHL), defined by concurrent MYC and BCL2 (or, alternatively, BCL6) rearrangements, have a very poor outcome compared to standard-risk, diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Consequently, dose-intensive (DI) therapies and/or consolidation with high-dose therapy and transplant have been explored in DHL, although benefit has been debated. This meta-analysis compared survival outcomes in DHL patients receiving dose-escalated regimens [DI: R-Hyper-CVAD (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone) or R-CODOX-M/IVAC (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, methotrexate/ifosfamide, etoposide, high dose cytarabine); or intermediate-dose: R-EPOCH (rituximab, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone)] versus standard-dose regimens (R-CHOP; rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) in the first-line setting. Data were synthesized to estimate hazard ratios of dose-escalated treatments versus R-CHOP using a Weibull proportional hazards model within a Bayesian meta-analysis framework. Eleven studies examining 394 patients were included. Patients were treated with either front-line R-CHOP (n = 180), R-EPOCH (n = 91), or R-Hyper-CVAD/rituximab, methotrexate, cytarabine (R-M/C), R-CODOX-M/R-IVAC (DI) (n = 123). Our meta-analysis revealed that median progression-free survival (n = 350) for the R-CHOP, R-EPOCH and DI groups was 12·1, 22·2, and 18·9 months, respectively. First-line treatment with R-EPOCH significantly reduced the risk of a progression compared with R-CHOP (relative risk reduction of 34%; P = 0·032); however, overall survival (n = 374) was not significantly different across treatment approaches. A subset of patients might benefit from intensive induction with/without transplant. Further investigation into the role of transplant and novel therapy combinations is necessary.© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Cost-effectiveness analysis of routine surveillance imaging of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in first remission. - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Surveillance imaging of asymptomatic patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in first remission remains controversial. A decision-analytic Markov model was developed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of follow-up strategies following first-line immunochemotherapy.Three strategies were compared in 55-year-old patient cohorts: routine clinical follow-up without serial imaging, routine follow-up with biannual computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 years, or routine follow-up with biannual [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) for 2 years. The baseline model favored imaging-based strategies by associating asymptomatic imaging-detected relapses with improved clinical outcomes. Lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated for each surveillance strategy.Surveillance strategies utilizing 2 years of routine CT or PET/CT scans were associated with minimal survival benefit when compared with clinical follow-up without routine imaging (life-years gained: CT, 0.03 years; PET/CT, 0.04 years). The benefit of imaging-based follow-up remained small after quality-of-life adjustments (CT, 0.020 QALYs; PET/CT, 0.025 QALYs). Costs associated with imaging-based surveillance strategies are considerable; ICERs for imaging strategies compared with clinical follow-up were $164,960/QALY (95% CI, $116,510 to $766,930/QALY) and $168,750/QALY (95% CI, $117,440 to 853,550/QALY) for CT and PET/CT, respectively. Model conclusions were robust and remained stable on one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses.Our cost-effectiveness analysis suggests surveillance imaging of asymptomatic DLBCL patients in remission offers little clinical benefit at substantial economic costs.© 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
Reduced-dose fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR-Lite) plus lenalidomide, followed by lenalidomide consolidation/maintenance, in previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia. - American journal of hematology
Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) remains the standard of care for fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients requiring first therapy. However, side effects can be significant, and patients with poor risk features have inferior outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate reduced-dose FCR (FCR-Lite) plus lenalidomide (FCR(2) ) followed by lenalidomide maintenance as a strategy to shorten immunochemotherapy in untreated CLL. Patients received four to six cycles of FCR(2) . Patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD) negative in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) initiated 12 months of lenalidomide maintenance after either four or six cycles (based on MRD status). The primary study endpoint was the complete response (CR) rate after four cycles of FCR(2) . Twenty patients were evaluable. After four cycles of FCR(2) , response rates were: CR, 45.0%; CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi), 5.0%; partial response (PR), 45.0%; and stable disease (SD), 5.0%. BM and PB samples from 27.8% and 52.9% of patients, respectively, were MRD negative. After six cycles, response rates were: CR, 58.3%; CRi, 16.7%; and PR, 25.0%. BM and PB samples from 50.0% and 72.7% of patients, respectively, were MRD negative. Overall, 75% of evaluable patients achieved a CR or CRi following FCR(2) . After 17.4 months of median follow-up, one progression and one death occurred. Our findings suggest that FCR(2) combines encouraging clinical activity with acceptable toxicity in previously untreated CLL. Lenalidomide can be safely added to FCR and may reduce chemotherapy exposure without compromising outcomes.© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Combination of Lenalidomide and Rituximab Overcomes Rituximab Resistance in Patients with Indolent B-cell and Mantle Cell Lymphomas. - Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory agent that enhances antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, has the potential to synergize with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb. We hypothesized that the addition of lenalidomide to rituximab would improve clinical outcomes in patients with B-cell lymphomas who were previously rituximab resistant, defined as no response to or progression of lymphoma within 6 months of rituximab-based therapy.We conducted a single-center, phase II trial in patients with indolent B-cell or mantle cell lymphomas who were previously rituximab resistant. Patients received 10 mg lenalidomide daily for 8 weeks, and then received four weekly doses of 375 mg/m(2) rituximab; lenalidomide continued during and after rituximab. Response to therapy was assessed after 8 weeks of lenalidomide and 12 weeks after first dose of rituximab. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) after lenalidomide and rituximab.Fifty patients were enrolled and 43 patients completed both response assessments. ORR after 8 weeks of lenalidomide was 30.2%; 12 weeks after the addition of rituximab to lenalidomide, ORR increased to 62.8% (N = 43). For all patients (N = 50), median progression-free survival (PFS) is 22.2 months (median follow-up, 39.2 months). PFS after lenalidomide-rituximab was significantly longer than the PFS for the antecedent regimen used to define rituximab resistance (22.2 vs. 9.13 months, P = 0.0004).This trial is the first to show that the combination of lenalidomide and rituximab overcomes prior rituximab resistance in patients with indolent B-cell and mantle cell lymphomas.©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
Utility of interim and end-of-treatment [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in frontline therapy of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. - Leukemia & lymphoma
[(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is part of standard pretreatment staging and post-treatment assessment in patients undergoing first-line therapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). While many providers obtain interim PET/CT (I-PET) for DLBCL, the clinical utility of these scans is unclear. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with DLBCL undergoing I-PET during first-line therapy (n = 94). The majority (61%) of patients had at least one negative I-PET and all patients with negative I-PET remained in remission at the end of treatment. I-PET was strongly associated with progression-free survival and remained independent on multivariable modeling (non-complete remission [CR]:CR I-PET, hazard ratio 2.7, p = 0.01). All patients with negative I-PET were in remission at the end of frontline therapy, and end-of-treatment PET/CT offered little clinical utility in this subset. Therefore, I-PET may offer an approach of early clinical predication and obviate the need for end-of-treatment imaging in the majority of patients with DLBCL.
The role of FDG-PET imaging as a prognostic marker of outcome in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. - Cancer medicine
Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that arises in the mediastinum from B-cells of thymic origin. Optimal management of patients with PMBL remains controversial. The present study evaluates outcomes of 27 PMBL patients treated with R-CHOP with or without radiation therapy (RT). It investigates the role of both interim and posttreatment fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) as prognostic markers of outcome. Additionally, it assesses postprogression therapies in the six patients who had progressive disease. At a median follow-up of 41.5 months (range: 6.1-147.2 months), OS was 95.5% (95% CI = 71.9-99.4) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 70.4% (95% CI = 49.4-83.9) for the entire cohort. The negative predictive values of interim and posttreatment FDG-PET scans were both 100%. Patients who failed initial therapy and were treated with salvage regimens and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) all achieved and maintained CR. PMBL patients can achieve excellent outcomes with minimal toxicities when treated with R-CHOP with or without RT. Negative interim and negative posttreatment FDG-PET results identified PMBL patients who achieve long-term remission. However, the significance of both positive interim and positive posttreatment FDG-PET results needs to be better defined. Those who failed initial therapy were successfully treated with salvage regimens and ASCT.© 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
R-CHOP or R-HyperCVAD with or without autologous stem cell transplantation for older patients with mantle cell lymphoma. - Clinical lymphoma, myeloma & leukemia
Although intensive induction and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) prolong survival in younger patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), benefit in older patients remains uncertain because data supporting these approaches come almost exclusively from younger cohorts.We reviewed outcomes for 38 patients with MCL aged ≥ 60 years who received R-CHOP (rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) (n = 19) or R-HyperCVAD (rituximab plus hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone alternating with high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine) (n = 19) with or without ASCT.Median progression-free survival (PFS) of R-CHOP + ASCT (3.2 years) and R-HyperCVAD alone (4.0 years) was longer than that for R-CHOP alone (1.6 years; P = .013 and P = .009, respectively). R-CHOP + ASCT and R-HyperCVAD resulted in similar PFS (P = .66). R-HyperCVAD induction led to a higher incidence of toxicity, including therapy discontinuation and need for transfusions, compared with R-CHOP, although rates of adverse events were similar for R-HyperCVAD alone and R-CHOP + ASCT.R-CHOP alone is less effective therapy for fit older patients with MCL. Intensifying therapy with R-HyperCVAD induction or ASCT consolidation after R-CHOP is associated with prolonged PFS and similar rates of toxicity. Consideration should be given to individual preferences regarding the differing method of administration and relative timing of toxicity with each regimen.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
'Double-Hit' cytogenetic status may not be predicted by baseline clinicopathological characteristics and is highly associated with overall survival in B cell lymphoma patients. - British journal of haematology
'Double-Hit' (DH) B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas are characterized by the presence of a MYC rearrangement and additional rearrangement(s) most commonly involving BCL2 and/or BCL6. Patients with DH lymphomas are unlikely to achieve long-term survival when treated with standard immunochemotherapy alone. DH gene rearrangements can be identified through metaphase karyotyping or more sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), although the latter is not routinely performed. We report 53 cases of B cell lymphoma that underwent diagnostic metaphase karyotying or FISH for MYC rearrangements. DH lymphoma was detected in 17 cases. No baseline factor, including age, serum lactate dehydrogenase, stage, International Prognostic Index or histology predicted for DH status. The median overall survival was significantly shorter for DH compared to non-DH lymphoma patients (8·2 vs. 56·8 months, P < 0·001). DH status retained the most statistically significant association with overall survival on multivariate Cox regression analysis. DH status could not be inferred by baseline disease- or patient-related characteristics and was most predictive of overall survival in this cohort of B cell lymphoma patients. These findings support the practice of routine performance of FISH for DH gene rearrangements on B cell lymphoma specimens in order to effectively identify DH patients who may benefit from risk-adapted therapy.© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Combined lenalidomide, low-dose dexamethasone, and rituximab achieves durable responses in rituximab-resistant indolent and mantle cell lymphomas. - Cancer
Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug with effects on the immune system that may enhance antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and reverse tumor-induced immune suppression. Furthermore, single-agent lenalidomide has therapeutic activity in relapsed/refractory B-cell lymphomas. These immunologic effects potentially may enhance the action of rituximab.To test the efficacy of lenalidomide combined with rituximab, the authors conducted a phase 2 trial of lenalidomide, low-dose dexamethasone, and rituximab in patients who had rituximab-resistant, relapsed/refractory, indolent B-cell or mantle cell lymphomas. Patients received two 28-day treatment cycles of lenalidomide 10 mg daily and dexamethasone 8 mg once weekly (part I). During cycle 3, 4 weekly doses of rituximab 375 mg/m2 were administered with lenalidomide-dexamethasone (part II). After the part II response assessment, stable or responding patients continued to receive lenalidomide-dexamethasone.Twenty-seven patients with follicular (n=18), mantle cell (n=5), small lymphocytic (n=3), and marginal zone (n=1) lymphomas started therapy; 3 of 27 patients discontinued therapy because of adverse events and were not evaluable for response. For 24 patients, the overall response rate after part I was 29% (4 patients had a complete response [CR] or CR unconfirmed, and 3 patients had a partial response), and the overall response rate after part II was 58% (8 patients had a CR, and 6 patients had a partial response). For 27 patients, at a median follow-up of 12.2 months, the median progression-free survival was 23.7 months.The combination of lenalidomide, low-dose dexamethasone, and rituximab achieved high response rates with durable responses in patients with rituximab-resistant, indolent B-cell and mantle cell lymphomas. Overall response rate increased from 29% after two 28-day cycles of lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone to 58% after the addition of rituximab, suggesting that lenalidomide can overcome resistance to rituximab.© 2013 American Cancer Society.

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3400 Civic Center Boulevard Suite 2 West Philadelphia, PA 19104
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