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Dr. Brian  Golden  Md image

Dr. Brian Golden Md

2 Crosfield Ave Ste 204
West Nyack NY 10994
845 586-6266
Medical School: Umdnj-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School - 1999
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 219393
NPI: 1558334102
Taxonomy Codes:
207RE0101X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Brian Golden is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:77082 Description:Dxa bone density vert fx Average Price:$250.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$33.79
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$350.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$147.05
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$400.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$215.46
HCPCS Code:77080 Description:Dxa bone density axial Average Price:$250.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$73.40
HCPCS Code:76536 Description:Us exam of head and neck Average Price:$250.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$145.07
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$76.71
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$250.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$181.20
HCPCS Code:96401 Description:Chemo anti-neopl sq/im Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$86.96
HCPCS Code:84270 Description:Assay of sex hormone globul Average Price:$90.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$30.78
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$100.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$41.96
HCPCS Code:84153 Description:Assay of psa total Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.06
HCPCS Code:83002 Description:Gonadotropin (LH) Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.23
HCPCS Code:83001 Description:Gonadotropin (FSH) Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.32
HCPCS Code:86376 Description:Microsomal antibody Average Price:$60.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.61
HCPCS Code:Q2038 Description:Fluzone vacc, 3 yrs & >, im Average Price:$50.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.35
HCPCS Code:80076 Description:Hepatic function panel Average Price:$45.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.95
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$117.50
HCPCS Code:84480 Description:Assay triiodothyronine (t3) Average Price:$50.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.08
HCPCS Code:80061 Description:Lipid panel Average Price:$40.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.43
HCPCS Code:84403 Description:Assay of total testosterone Average Price:$60.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$36.57
HCPCS Code:80053 Description:Comprehen metabolic panel Average Price:$35.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.88
HCPCS Code:84443 Description:Assay thyroid stim hormone Average Price:$45.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$23.80
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$100.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$79.75
HCPCS Code:J0897 Description:Denosumab injection Average Price:$33.33 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$14.38
HCPCS Code:80048 Description:Metabolic panel total ca Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$5.00
HCPCS Code:85025 Description:Complete cbc w/auto diff wbc Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.02
HCPCS Code:80069 Description:Renal function panel Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.35
HCPCS Code:84146 Description:Assay of prolactin Average Price:$40.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$27.45
HCPCS Code:82947 Description:Assay glucose blood quant Average Price:$15.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.40
HCPCS Code:83036 Description:Glycosylated hemoglobin test Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.75
HCPCS Code:84479 Description:Assay of thyroid (t3 or t4) Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.17
HCPCS Code:84436 Description:Assay of total thyroxine Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.73
HCPCS Code:82570 Description:Assay of urine creatinine Average Price:$15.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.33
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$10.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00
HCPCS Code:83540 Description:Assay of iron Average Price:$15.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.18
HCPCS Code:82044 Description:Microalbumin semiquant Average Price:$10.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.30
HCPCS Code:82948 Description:Reagent strip/blood glucose Average Price:$10.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.48
HCPCS Code:82746 Description:Blood folic acid serum Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.82
HCPCS Code:82607 Description:Vitamin B-12 Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$21.35
HCPCS Code:83550 Description:Iron binding test Average Price:$15.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.38
HCPCS Code:83970 Description:Assay of parathormone Average Price:$60.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$58.46
HCPCS Code:G0008 Description:Admin influenza virus vac Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.00

HCPCS Code Definitions

Q2038
Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (fluzone)
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
G0008
Administration of influenza virus vaccine
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
96401
Chemotherapy administration, subcutaneous or intramuscular; non-hormonal anti-neoplastic
J0897
Injection, denosumab, 1 mg
76536
Ultrasound, soft tissues of head and neck (eg, thyroid, parathyroid, parotid), real time with image documentation
77080
Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bone density study, 1 or more sites; axial skeleton (eg, hips, pelvis, spine)
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1528032521
Internal Medicine
1,466
1841201670
Nephrology
1,429
1639101595
Internal Medicine
1,377
1063482636
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,008
1649244476
Pulmonary Disease
951
1568543742
Hematology/Oncology
950
1699786251
Internal Medicine
925
1083604896
Diagnostic Radiology
908
1942223920
Ophthalmology
818
1871640334
Rheumatology
816
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Golden has made to other doctors

Publications

Evaluation of an emergency department lean process improvement program to reduce length of stay. - Annals of emergency medicine
In recent years, lean principles have been applied to improve wait times in the emergency department (ED). In 2009, an ED process improvement program based on lean methods was introduced in Ontario as part of a broad strategy to reduce ED length of stay and improve patient flow. This study seeks to determine the effect of this program on ED wait times and quality of care.We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all ED visits at program and control sites during 3 program waves from April 1, 2007, to June 30, 2011, in Ontario, Canada. Time series analyses of outcomes before and after the program and difference-in-differences analyses comparing changes in program sites with control sites were conducted.In before-after models among program sites alone, 90th percentile ED length of stay did not change in wave 1 (-14 minutes [95% confidence interval {CI} -47 to 20]) but decreased after wave 2 (-87 [95% CI -108 to -66]) and wave 3 (-33 [95% CI -50 to -17]); median ED length of stay decreased after wave 1 (-18 [95% CI -24 to -12]), wave 2 (-23 [95% CI -27 to -19]), and wave 3 (-15 [95% CI -18 to -12]). In all waves, decreases were observed in time to physician assessment, left-without-being-seen rates, and 72-hour ED revisit rates. In the difference-in-difference models, in which changes in program sites were compared with controls, the program was associated with no change in 90th percentile ED length of stay in wave 2 (17 [95% CI -0.2 to 33]) and increases in wave 1 (23 [95% CI 0.9 to 45]) and wave 3 (31 [95% CI 10 to 51]), modest reductions in median ED length of stay in waves 2 and 3 alone, and a decrease in time to physician assessment in wave 3 alone.Although the program reduced ED waiting times, it appeared that its benefits were diminished or disappeared when compared with that of control sites, which were exposed to system-wide initiatives such as public reporting and pay for performance. This study suggests that further evaluation of the effectiveness of lean methods in the ED is warranted before widespread implementation.Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Application of personalized medicine to chronic disease: a feasibility assessment. - Clinical and translational medicine
Personalized Medicine has the potential to improve health outcomes and reduce the cost of care; however its adoption has been slow in Canada. Bridgepoint Health is a complex continuous care provider striving to reduce the burden of polypharmacy in chronic patients. The main goal of the study was to explore the feasibility of utilizing personalized medicine in the treatment of chronic complex patients as a preliminary institutional health technology assessment. We analyzed stroke treatment optimization as a clinical indication that could serve as a "proof of concept" for the widespread implementation of pharmacogenetics. The objectives of the study were three-fold:1. Review current practice in medication administration for stroke treatment at Bridgepoint Health2. Critically analyze evidence that pharmacogenetic testing could (or could not) enhance drug selection and treatment efficacy for stroke patients;3. Assess the cost-benefit potential of a pharmacogenetic intervention for stroke.Review current practice in medication administration for stroke treatment at Bridgepoint HealthCritically analyze evidence that pharmacogenetic testing could (or could not) enhance drug selection and treatment efficacy for stroke patients;Assess the cost-benefit potential of a pharmacogenetic intervention for stroke.We conducted a review of stroke treatment practices at Bridgepoint Health, scanned the literature for drug-gene and drug-outcome interactions, and evaluated the potential consequences of pharmacogenetic testing using the ACCE model.There is a substantial body of evidence suggesting that pharmacogenetic stratification of stroke treatment can improve patient outcomes in the long-term, and provide substantial efficiencies for the healthcare system in the short-term. Specifically, pharmacogenetic stratification of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies for stroke patients may have a major impact on the risk of disease recurrence, and thus should be explored further for clinical application. Bridgepoint Health, and other healthcare institutions taking this path, should consider launching pilot projects to assess the practical impact of pharmacogenetics to optimize treatment for chronic continuous care.
Improving hospital efficiency: a process model of organizational change commitments. - Medical care research and review : MCRR
Improving hospital efficiency is a critical goal for managers and policy makers. We draw on participant observation of the perioperative coaching program in seven Ontario hospitals to develop knowledge of the process by which the content of change initiatives to increase hospital efficiency is defined. The coaching program was a change initiative involving the use of external facilitators with the goal of increasing perioperative efficiency. Focusing on the role of subjective understandings in shaping initiatives to improve efficiency, we show that physicians, nurses, administrators, and external facilitators all have differing frames of the problems that limit efficiency, and propose different changes that could enhance efficiency. Dynamics of strategic and contested framing ultimately shaped hospital change commitments. We build on work identifying factors that enhance the success of change efforts to improve hospital efficiency, highlighting the importance of subjective understandings and the politics of meaning-making in defining what hospitals change.
Theory of constraints for publicly funded health systems. - Health care management science
Originally developed in the context of publicly traded for-profit companies, theory of constraints (TOC) improves system performance through leveraging the constraint(s). While the theory seems to be a natural fit for resource-constrained publicly funded health systems, there is a lack of literature addressing the modifications required to adopt TOC and define the goal and performance measures. This paper develops a system dynamics representation of the classical TOC's system-wide goal and performance measures for publicly traded for-profit companies, which forms the basis for developing a similar model for publicly funded health systems. The model is then expanded to include some of the factors that affect system performance, providing a framework to apply TOC's process of ongoing improvement in publicly funded health systems. Future research is required to more accurately define the factors affecting system performance and populate the model with evidence-based estimates for various parameters in order to use the model to guide TOC's process of ongoing improvement.
Adrenal cortical carcinoma with late pulmonary metastases causing clinicical Cushing's syndrome: case report with immunohistochemical analysis of steriodogenic enzyme production. - Endocrine practice : official journal of the American College of Endocrinology and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists
To present a case of pulmonary metastases from adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC) that were secreting fully-functional cortisol resulting in clinical Cushing's syndrome and to compare the steroidogenic enzyme expression in the primary tumor and lung.We analyzed and summarized the patient's medical history, physical examination results, laboratory data, imaging studies, and histopathologic results. The original tumor and the pulmonary metastases were then immunohistochemically evaluated for steroidogenic enzymes.Initial endocrinological workup revealed hyperandrogenism and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) independent Cushing's due to a 4 cm left adrenal mass. The patient was initially diagnosed with an adrenal adenoma. Four years later, the patient developed recurrent Cushing's syndrome. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no adrenal masses; however, chest computed tomography (CT) showed multiple bilateral lung nodules and biopsy revealed metastases of adrenal origin. Upon immunohistochemical analysis, side chain cleavage, 17α hydroxylase, 3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and 21 hydroxylase immunoreactivity were detected in both the original and pulmonary metastatic lesions with patterns of disorganized steroidogenesis. Dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfotransferase (DHEA-ST) immunoreactivity was detected in the original tumor but not in the lung metastases.This case demonstrates some interesting features of ACC that pose challenges to its management, including the difficulties in establishing the pathologic diagnosis, the potential for fully functional steroidogenesis even in late metastases, and the plasticity of steroidogenic potential in tumor cells.
Improving the patient experience through design. - Healthcare quarterly (Toronto, Ont.)
Toronto's Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) received a major financial gift to redesign its chemotherapy daycare and transfusion facilities, which were over capacity and in need of improvement, both functionally and aesthetically. PMH's vision was to create a new space and experience that was truly patient centric and world class. Meanwhile, a research team at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management had also received a gift from a corporate donor with a patient-focused mandate to examine ways in which healthcare in Canada could be made more patient centric. The Rotman research team was invited to work with the hospital's staff, physicians, patients and families to explore a more patient-centered approach to care.
Measuring Integration of Cancer Services to Support Performance Improvement: The CSI Survey. - Healthcare policy = Politiques de santé
To develop a measure of cancer services integration (CSI) that can inform clinical and administrative decision-makers in their efforts to monitor and improve cancer system performance.We employed a systematic approach to measurement development, including review of existing cancer/health services integration measures, key-informant interviews and focus groups with cancer system leaders. The research team constructed a Web-based survey that was field- and pilot-tested, refined and then formally conducted on a sample of cancer care providers and administrators in Ontario, Canada. We then conducted exploratory factor analysis to identify key dimensions of CSI.A total of 1,769 physicians, other clinicians and administrators participated in the survey, responding to a 67-item questionnaire. The exploratory factor analysis identified 12 factors that were linked to three broader dimensions: clinical, functional and vertical system integration.The CSI Survey provides important insights on a range of typically unmeasured aspects of the coordination and integration of cancer services, representing a new tool to inform performance improvement efforts.
Leading Lean: a Canadian healthcare leader's guide. - Healthcare quarterly (Toronto, Ont.)
Canadian healthcare organizations are increasingly asked to do more with less, and too often this has resulted in demands on staff to simply work harder and longer. Lean methodologies, originating from Japanese industrial organizations and most notably Toyota, offer an alternative - tried and tested approaches to working smarter. Lean, with its systematic approaches to reducing waste, has found its way to Canadian healthcare organizations with promising results. This article reports on a study of five Canadian healthcare providers that have recently implemented Lean. We offer stories of success but also identify potential obstacles and ways by which they may be surmounted to provide better value for our healthcare investments.
Development of a minimization instrument for allocation of a hospital-level performance improvement intervention to reduce waiting times in Ontario emergency departments. - Implementation science : IS
Rigorous evaluation of an intervention requires that its allocation be unbiased with respect to confounders; this is especially difficult in complex, system-wide healthcare interventions. We developed a short survey instrument to identify factors for a minimization algorithm for the allocation of a hospital-level intervention to reduce emergency department (ED) waiting times in Ontario, Canada.Potential confounders influencing the intervention's success were identified by literature review, and grouped by healthcare setting specific change stages. An international multi-disciplinary (clinical, administrative, decision maker, management) panel evaluated these factors in a two-stage modified-delphi and nominal group process based on four domains: change readiness, evidence base, face validity, and clarity of definition.An original set of 33 factors were identified from the literature. The panel reduced the list to 12 in the first round survey. In the second survey, experts scored each factor according to the four domains; summary scores and consensus discussion resulted in the final selection and measurement of four hospital-level factors to be used in the minimization algorithm: improved patient flow as a hospital's leadership priority; physicians' receptiveness to organizational change; efficiency of bed management; and physician incentives supporting the change goal.We developed a simple tool designed to gather data from senior hospital administrators on factors likely to affect the success of a hospital patient flow improvement intervention. A minimization algorithm will ensure balanced allocation of the intervention with respect to these factors in study hospitals.
Autoimmune thyroiditis and diabetes: dissecting the joint genetic susceptibility in a large cohort of multiplex families. - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
Epidemiological data support a shared genetic susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Both diseases frequently occur within the same family and in the same individual. Patients developing both T1D and AITD are considered to have an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v).The goals of this study were to identify the joint susceptibility loci/genes for T1D and AITD.The study was conducted at an academic medical center.We used whole genome and candidate gene approaches in a data set of 88 families multiplex for T1D and AITD (448 individuals).We identified three loci, on chromosomes 2p, 6p, and Xp, showing linkage when individuals with either T1D or AITD were classified as affected. The 6p locus contained the human leukocyte antigen class II genes, and the Xp locus contained the FOXP3 gene. Three loci, on 2q, 6p (human leukocyte antigen class II), and Xp, showed evidence for linkage when only APS3v individuals (T1D+AITD) were classified as affected. Analysis of positional candidate genes strongly supported CTLA-4 as the gene on 2q associated with APS3v and FOXP3 as the gene on Xp associated with T1D or AITD and APS3v. In addition, the PTPN22 and insulin variable number tandem repeat genes showed significant associations with T1D or AITD in our families.Our results demonstrate a strong shared genetic susceptibility to T1D and AITD, with most shared genes involved in immune regulation, suggesting that immune dysregulation plays an important role in the joint susceptibility to T1D and AITD.

Map & Directions

2 Crosfield Ave Ste 204 West Nyack, NY 10994
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