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Dr. R Scott  Wright  Md image

Dr. R Scott Wright Md

200 1St St Sw
Rochester MN 55905
507 842-2511
Medical School: University Of Kentucky College Of Medicine - 1989
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 33852
NPI: 1558333922
Taxonomy Codes:
207RC0000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. R Scott Wright is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$208.01 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$180.60
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$149.45 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$127.27
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$165.97 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$144.00
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$138.46 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$119.94
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$81.68 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$63.98
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$109.47 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$93.62
HCPCS Code:93224 Description:Ecg monit/reprt up to 48 hrs Average Price:$107.99 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$93.38
HCPCS Code:93010 Description:Electrocardiogram report Average Price:$21.82 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.92
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$73.99 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$64.01
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$74.23 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$64.28
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$24.69 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$17.60
HCPCS Code:93226 Description:Ecg monit/reprt up to 48 hrs Average Price:$47.22 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.92
HCPCS Code:93005 Description:Electrocardiogram tracing Average Price:$16.11 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.81
HCPCS Code:93010 Description:Electrocardiogram report Average Price:$12.61 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.80
HCPCS Code:93227 Description:Ecg monit/reprt up to 48 hrs Average Price:$28.67 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$24.84
HCPCS Code:Q3014 Description:Telehealth facility fee Average Price:$19.15 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.15

HCPCS Code Definitions

99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
93227
External electrocardiographic recording up to 48 hours by continuous rhythm recording and storage; review and interpretation by a physician or other qualified health care professional
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
Q3014
Telehealth originating site facility fee
99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
93010
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; interpretation and report only
93005
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; tracing only, without interpretation and report
93226
External electrocardiographic recording up to 48 hours by continuous rhythm recording and storage; scanning analysis with report
93010
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; interpretation and report only
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
93224
External electrocardiographic recording up to 48 hours by continuous rhythm recording and storage; includes recording, scanning analysis with report, review and interpretation by a physician or other qualified health care professional

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1215901301
Cardiac Electrophysiology
1,191
1992782437
Pathology
1,074
1104802347
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
729
1003896515
Cardiac Electrophysiology
542
1285608547
Internal Medicine
517
1730163460
Internal Medicine
433
1215911904
Family Practice
424
1912981200
Internal Medicine
409
1730151259
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
406
1255301511
Internal Medicine
348
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Wright has made to other doctors

Publications

Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome: Diagnostic Challenge and the Importance of Heightened Clinical Suspicion. - Texas Heart Institute journal / from the Texas Heart Institute of St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital, Texas Children's Hospital
Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome is an uncommon condition of positional dyspnea and hypoxemia; symptoms occur when the patient is upright and resolve with recumbency. Causes can be broadly categorized into 4 groups: intracardiac shunting, pulmonary shunting, ventilation-perfusion mismatch, or a combination of these. Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome should be suspected when normal arterial oxygen saturations are recorded while an individual is supine, followed by abrupt declines in those saturations when upright. Further investigations with use of imaging and cardiac catheterization aid in the evaluation. When platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome is due to intracardiac shunting without pulmonary hypertension, intracardiac shunt closure can be curative. In this article, we report a case of platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome in an 83-year-old woman who was successfully treated by means of percutaneous transcatheter closure of an atrial septal defect.
Incidence and 1-Year Outcomes of Perioperative Atrial Arrhythmia in Elderly Adults After Hip Fracture Surgery. - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
To determine the incidence and 1-year outcomes of an elderly population with perioperative atrial arrhythmia (PAA) within 7 days of hip fracture surgery.Retrospective cohort study.The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP).Elderly adults consecutive undergoing hip fracture repair from 1988 to 2002 in Olmsted County, Minnesota (N = 1,088, mean age 84.0 ± 7.4, 80.2% female).Baseline clinical variables were analyzed in relation to survival using Cox proportional hazards methods for comparison.Sixty-one participants (5.6%) developed PAA within the first 7 days. During 1 year of follow-up, 239 (22%) participants died. PAA was associated with greater mortality (45% vs 21%; hazard ratio (HR) = 2.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.9-4.2). Other mortality risk factors were male sex (HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5-2.6), congestive heart failure (HR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.7-2.8), chronic renal insufficiency (HR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5-2.8), dementia (HR = 2.9, 95% CI = 2.2-3.7), and American Society of Anesthesiologists risk Class III, IV, or V (HR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.9-5.9).Elderly adults undergoing hip fracture surgery who develop PAA within 7 days have significantly higher 1-year mortality than those who do not. Further studies are indicated to determine whether prevention of PAA will reduce mortality in this population.© 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.
Nonexercise activity thermogenesis in obesity management. - Mayo Clinic proceedings
Obesity is linked to cardiovascular disease. The global increase in sedentary lifestyle is an important factor contributing to the rising prevalence of the obesity epidemic. Traditionally, counseling has focused on moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise, with disappointing results. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) is an important component of daily energy expenditure. It represents the common daily activities, such as fidgeting, walking, and standing. These high-effect NEAT movements could result in up to an extra 2000 kcal of expenditure per day beyond the basal metabolic rate, depending on body weight and level of activity. Implementing NEAT during leisure-time and occupational activities could be essential to maintaining a negative energy balance. NEAT can be applied by being upright, ambulating, and redesigning workplace and leisure-time environments to promote NEAT. The benefits of NEAT include not only the extra calories expended but also the reduced occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality. We believe that to overcome the obesity epidemic and its adverse cardiovascular consequences, NEAT should be part of the current medical recommendations. The content of this review is based on a literature search of PubMed and the Google search engine between January 1, 1960, and October 1, 2014, using the search terms physical activity, obesity, energy expenditure, nonexercise activity thermogenesis, and NEAT.Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
A summary and critical assessment of the 2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults: filling the gaps. - Mayo Clinic proceedings
The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Task Force on Practice Guidelines has recently released the new cholesterol treatment guideline. This update was based on a systematic review of the evidence and replaces the previous guidelines from 2002 that were widely accepted and implemented in clinical practice. The new cholesterol treatment guideline emphasizes matching the intensity of statin treatment to the level of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk and replaces the old paradigm of pursuing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The new guideline also emphasizes the primacy of the evidence base for statin therapy for ASCVD risk reduction and lists several patient groups that will not benefit from statin treatment despite their high cardiovascular risk, such as those with heart failure (New York Heart Association class II-IV) and patients undergoing hemodialysis. The guideline has been received with mixed reviews and significant controversy. Because of the evidence-based nature of the guideline, there is room for several questions and uncertainties on when and how to use lipid-lowering therapy in clinical practice. The goal of the Mayo Clinic Task Force in the assessment, interpretation, and expansion of the ACC/AHA cholesterol treatment guideline is to address gaps in information and some of the controversial aspects of the newly released cholesterol management guideline using additional sources of evidence and expert opinion as needed to guide clinicians on key aspects of ASCVD risk reduction.Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Varespladib and cardiovascular events in patients with an acute coronary syndrome: the VISTA-16 randomized clinical trial. - JAMA
Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) generates bioactive phospholipid products implicated in atherosclerosis. The sPLA2 inhibitor varespladib has favorable effects on lipid and inflammatory markers; however, its effect on cardiovascular outcomes is unknown.To determine the effects of sPLA2 inhibition with varespladib on cardiovascular outcomes.A double-blind, randomized, multicenter trial at 362 academic and community hospitals in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, India, and North America of 5145 patients randomized within 96 hours of presentation of an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to either varespladib (n = 2572) or placebo (n = 2573) with enrollment between June 1, 2010, and March 7, 2012 (study termination on March 9, 2012).Participants were randomized to receive varespladib (500 mg) or placebo daily for 16 weeks, in addition to atorvastatin and other established therapies.The primary efficacy measure was a composite of cardiovascular mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), nonfatal stroke, or unstable angina with evidence of ischemia requiring hospitalization at 16 weeks. Six-month survival status was also evaluated.At a prespecified interim analysis, including 212 primary end point events, the independent data and safety monitoring board recommended termination of the trial for futility and possible harm. The primary end point occurred in 136 patients (6.1%) treated with varespladib compared with 109 patients (5.1%) treated with placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% CI, 0.97-1.61; log-rank P = .08). Varespladib was associated with a greater risk of MI (78 [3.4%] vs 47 [2.2%]; HR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.16-2.39; log-rank P = .005). The composite secondary end point of cardiovascular mortality, MI, and stroke was observed in 107 patients (4.6%) in the varespladib group and 79 patients (3.8%) in the placebo group (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.02-1.82; P = .04).In patients with recent ACS, varespladib did not reduce the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events and significantly increased the risk of MI. The sPLA2 inhibition with varespladib may be harmful and is not a useful strategy to reduce adverse cardiovascular outcomes after ACS.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01130246.
Questions and answers on proper peri-operative management of antiplatelet therapy after coronary stent implantation to prevent stent thrombosis. - The American journal of cardiology
Stent thrombosis (ST) is a rare but life-threatening complication of coronary artery stenting. Although dual-antiplatelet therapy is an effective management strategy in reducing the risk for ST, some patients may need to interrupt their regimens because of unforeseen circumstances, such as the requirement for surgery. In conclusion, this case presentation highlights some pertinent issues related to ST, including its risk factors, the perioperative management of antiplatelet agents, and treatment for ST.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Obstructive sleep apnea and the risk of sudden cardiac death: a longitudinal study of 10,701 adults. - Journal of the American College of Cardiology
This study sought to identify the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).Risk stratification for SCD, a major cause of mortality, is difficult. OSA is linked to cardiovascular disease and arrhythmias and has been shown to increase the risk of nocturnal SCD. It is unknown if OSA independently increases the risk of SCD.We included 10,701 consecutive adults undergoing their first diagnostic polysomnogram between July 1987 and July 2003. During follow-up up to 15 years, we assessed incident resuscitated or fatal SCD in relation to the presence of OSA, physiological data including the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and nocturnal oxygen saturation (O2sat) parameters, and relevant comorbidities.During an average follow-up of 5.3 years, 142 patients had resuscitated or fatal SCD (annual rate 0.27%). In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for SCD were age, hypertension, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy or heart failure, ventricular ectopy or nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, and lowest nocturnal O2sat (per 10% decrease, hazard ratio [HR]: 1.14; p = 0.029). SCD was best predicted by age >60 years (HR: 5.53), apnea-hypopnea index >20 (HR: 1.60), mean nocturnal O2sat <93% (HR: 2.93), and lowest nocturnal O2sat <78% (HR: 2.60; all p < 0.0001).In a population of 10,701 adults referred for polysomnography, OSA predicted incident SCD, and the magnitude of risk was predicted by multiple parameters characterizing OSA severity. Nocturnal hypoxemia, an important pathophysiological feature of OSA, strongly predicted SCD independently of well-established risk factors. These findings implicate OSA, a prevalent condition, as a novel risk factor for SCD.Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Recent clinical trials evaluating benefit of drug therapy for modification of HDL cholesterol. - Current opinion in cardiology
To highlight the recent data evaluating pharmacological manipulation of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and examine whether medication-induced changes were associated with improved clinical outcomes and reduced short-term and long-term cardiovascular risks. The review focuses on the studies with niacin and the new cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors torcetrapib, dalcetrapib, anacetrapib and evacetrapib.Several large randomized clinical trials have evaluated drug therapy on HDL-C and cardiovascular outcomes. Two studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes following HDL-C raising with niacin. Data from the Heart Protection 2 Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events and The Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health trials both demonstrated no clinical benefit from use of niacin therapy when added to background statin therapy with regard to short-term and long-term cardiovascular risk reduction. Both studies demonstrated excess side-effects from use of niacin. A number of clinical trials have evaluated HDL-C modification from use of a CETP inhibitor. All of the studies have demonstrated significant increases in HDL-C. To date, the outcome data are not favorable. Use of torcetrapib was associated with excess mortality. Use of dalcetrapib had no effect on short-term and long-term cardiovascular events. Two outcome studies with anacetrapib and evacetrapib are ongoing and will report out in a few years' time.Pharmacological manipulation of HDL-C has not improved the cardiovascular outcomes. Several agents have caused harm or unacceptable side-effects. Further studies are needed before one can recommend the use of additional lipid-modifying therapies beyond statins.
Modulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors for therapeutic benefit? Biology, clinical experience, and future prospects. - American heart journal
Clinical trials of cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus primarily have been directed at the modification of a single major risk factor; however, in trials that enroll patients with and without diabetes, the absolute risk in CVD events remains higher in patients with diabetes. Efforts to reduce the macrovascular and microvascular residual risk have been directed toward a multifactorial CVD risk-factor modification; nonetheless, long-term complications remain high. Dual-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α/γ agonists may offer opportunities to lower macrovascular and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus beyond the reductions achieved with conventional risk-factor modification. The information presented elucidates the differentiation of compound-specific vs class-effect properties of PPARs as the basis for future development of a new candidate molecule. Prior experience with thiazolidinediones, an approved class of PPARγ agonists, and glitazars, investigational class of dual-PPARα/γ agonists, also provides important lessons about the risks and benefits of targeting a nuclear receptor while revealing some of the future challenges for regulatory approval.Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Effects of dalcetrapib in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. - The New England journal of medicine
In observational analyses, higher levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol have been associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease events. However, whether raising HDL cholesterol levels therapeutically reduces cardiovascular risk remains uncertain. Inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) raises HDL cholesterol levels and might therefore improve cardiovascular outcomes.We randomly assigned 15,871 patients who had had a recent acute coronary syndrome to receive the CETP inhibitor dalcetrapib, at a dose of 600 mg daily, or placebo, in addition to the best available evidence-based care. The primary efficacy end point was a composite of death from coronary heart disease, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, unstable angina, or cardiac arrest with resuscitation.At the time of randomization, the mean HDL cholesterol level was 42 mg per deciliter (1.1 mmol per liter), and the mean low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level was 76 mg per deciliter (2.0 mmol per liter). Over the course of the trial, HDL cholesterol levels increased from baseline by 4 to 11% in the placebo group and by 31 to 40% in the dalcetrapib group. Dalcetrapib had a minimal effect on LDL cholesterol levels. Patients were followed for a median of 31 months. At a prespecified interim analysis that included 1135 primary end-point events (71% of the projected total number), the independent data and safety monitoring board recommended termination of the trial for futility. As compared with placebo, dalcetrapib did not alter the risk of the primary end point (cumulative event rate, 8.0% and 8.3%, respectively; hazard ratio with dalcetrapib, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.93 to 1.16; P=0.52) and did not have a significant effect on any component of the primary end point or total mortality. The median C-reactive protein level was 0.2 mg per liter higher and the mean systolic blood pressure was 0.6 mm Hg higher with dalcetrapib as compared with placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons).In patients who had had a recent acute coronary syndrome, dalcetrapib increased HDL cholesterol levels but did not reduce the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events. (Funded by F. Hoffmann-La Roche; dal-OUTCOMES ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00658515.).

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200 1St St Sw Rochester, MN 55905
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Nearby Doctors

200 1St St Sw
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200 1St St Sw
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