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Dr. Srikrishna  Sirivella  Md image

Dr. Srikrishna Sirivella Md

Erie Ave & Front Street St.Christopher's Hsptl For Children, Cardiothoracic
Philadelphia PA 19134
215 275-5109
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: MD 03 1967 E
NPI: 1548303464
Taxonomy Codes:
208G00000X

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Publications

Treatment outcomes in 23 thoracic primitive neuroectodermal tumours: a retrospective study. - Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery
Thoracic primitive neuroectodermal tumour is an aggressive malignancy with poor survival despite multimodality treatment regimens. Early diagnosis of the tumour by histological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and cytogenetic techniques and early total surgical resection of the tumour with intensive chemoradiation may improve outcomes.Over 30 years, 23 patients (median age 29.5) with primitive neuroectodermal tumours (15 chest wall, 4 lung, 3 costovertebral sulcus and 1 anterior mediastinum) were diagnosed by transthoracic needle biopsy (43%) or excisional biopsy (57%). Treatment of a localized disease (Stage I and II) in 19 patients included surgery (wide excision of chest lesions in 11, 4 lung resections, excision of 3 costovertebral sulcus and 1 anterior mediastinal tumours, and resection of adjacent tissues involved by tumour en bloc) with adjuvant chemoradiation. Four metastatic chest wall tumours (Stage III) had chemotherapy and radiation alone.Tumour recurred in 5 (2 chest wall, 2 costovertebral sulcus and 1 lung) requiring further chemotherapy, radiation and completion pneumonectomy for a lung recurrence. The incidence of recurrent tumour in 7 years for Stage I was 21 vs 40% (P=0.4) for Stage II lesions and 16% after the neoadjuvant chemotherapy vs 30% (P=0.4) after adjuvant chemoradiation. Four with recurrence, except one with a chest recurrence, succumbed to second relapse (78-96 months). All four Stage III chest tumours succumbed to advanced disease (30 months). The Kaplan-Meier disease-free survival of the overall group (23 patients) was 82±2% at 5 years and 64±3% at 10 years. The 10-year disease-free survival of 19 patients with localized tumours was 76%, but was high at 90% for chest wall tumours and low 33% for costovertebral sulcus tumours (P≤0.01). The 10-year disease-free survival was 86% for Stage I vs 60% (P=0.02) for Stage II tumours; and 83% for neoadjuvant vs 76% (P=0.06) for adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation.The primitive neuroectodermal tumours are aggressive neoplasms with poor prognosis. Early diagnosis and total surgical excision of localized tumours with neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation improved disease-free survival.
Surgery of the Ebstein's anomaly: early and late outcomes. - Journal of cardiac surgery
Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve is a complex malformation. Several operations have been undertaken with varying results. The severity of the morphology of the lesion and ventricular function determine the spectrum of surgical techniques that are employed with varying results.Between 1980 and 2005, 45 patients with Ebstein's anomaly underwent surgical repair. Age at operation ranged from 3 to 26 years (median 15.5, mean 18.0 years). In 41 patients (91%), tricuspid valvuloplasty was done. The other four patients had valve replacement with bio-prosthesis. Eight patients required ventricular unloading by creating bidirectional Glenn procedure in addition to a valve repair. Seven needed re-operations: one repeat valve repair, two valve replacements and three takedown of Glen shunt, and one Fontan operation.In-hospital deaths occurred in two patients (4.4%) and late mortality in four patients (9%). 95% of 39 survivors were followed for 5 months to 19.5 years (median follow-up, 5.0 years; mean follow-up, 6.9 years). The actuarial survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 96.5%± 2.4% at 1 year, 84.4%± 3.5% at 10 years and 83.3%± 5.6% at 19 years. At follow-up 90% were in functional class I or II with substantial improvement compared with their preoperative status. Doppler echocardiographic studies demonstrated good tricuspid valve function in most patients.Valve repair or replacement tailored to the anatomical substrate of the anomaly yielded good long-term results with substantial improvement in functional status. Bidirectional Glenn anastomosis combined with a valve repair improved ventricular function and improved both the early and late outcomes.© 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Chondroid syringoma: a rare tumor of the chest wall. - The Annals of thoracic surgery
Chondroid syringoma, an uncommon, slow-growing, benign, sweat-gland tumor located on the upper right chest wall of a 66-year-old woman is presented. This skin adenexal tumor is typically located on the head and neck region. The unusual location of chondroid syringoma made an accurate preoperative diagnosis difficult, and diagnosis was achieved only by excisional biopsy and histopathologic examination. Total surgical excision remains the best therapeutic option to avoid tumor recurrence and close follow-up is recommended because of a rare possibility of malignant transformation and visceral metastases.2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Results of coronary bypass and valve operations for mitral valve regurgitation. - Asian cardiovascular & thoracic annals
Combined coronary bypass grafting and valve procedures for mitral valve regurgitation result in poor outcomes, but the impact of the etiology of valve regurgitation on operative and long-term outcomes is not well defined. A retrospective analysis of 468 patients who had combined coronary bypass grafting and valve operations for mitral regurgitation showed that 78% had valve repairs and 22% had replacements for ischemic (45%) or degenerative (55%) disease. Predictors of operative mortality were ischemic mitral regurgitation, failure to use the internal mammary artery for grafting, severe coronary disease, acute myocardial infarction, low ejection fraction, advanced heart failure, emergency operation, and mitral valve replacement. The 5-year survival rates for propensity-matched patients with ischemic or degenerative disease were similar (66%). Low ejection fraction (< 35%), advanced age (> 67 years), valve replacement surgery, residual mitral regurgitation, and severe coronary artery disease were predictors of poor long-term outcome. Although the operative outcomes of ischemic mitral regurgitation were poor compared to those of degenerative disease, the long-term survival was similar in both groups of propensity-matched patients. Left ventricular remodeling, an optimal valve procedure without residual mitral regurgitation, and left ventricular function are more important determinants of long-term outcome than the etiology of valve regurgitation.
Clinical outcomes of surgery of mitral valve regurgitation and coronary artery bypass grafting. - Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery
The impact of etiology of associated mitral valve regurgitation and a valve procedure on operative and long-term outcomes after coronary bypass grafting surgery is yet to be clearly defined. Results of combined coronary artery bypass grafting and valve procedures for mitral valve regurgitation were retrospectively analyzed in 468 patients. The regurgitation was of ischemic in 45%, degenerative in 55% and 78% valve repairs, 22% valve replacements were performed. Severe coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, low ejection fraction, ischemic mitral regurgitation, advanced heart failure symptoms, failure to use internal mammary artery, valve replacement surgery, and emergency operations are predictors of operative mortality. The 5-year survivals for propensity-matched patients of ischemic and degenerative disease were similar (66%), but 67% vs. 83%, respectively, for unmatched patients. Low ejection fraction (<35%), advanced age (>67 years), valve replacement surgery, residual mitral regurgitation, and severe coronary artery disease were predictors of poor long-term survival. Left ventricular remodeling processes, optimal valve procedure without residual mitral regurgitation and left ventricular function are important determinants of long-term outcome than the etiology of valve regurgitation.
Results of coronary artery endarterectomy and coronary artery bypass grafting for diffuse coronary artery disease. - The Annals of thoracic surgery
Coronary artery endarterectomy with coronary artery bypass grafting for diffuse coronary artery disease has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated our institutional experience to redefine the role of coronary endarterectomy for diffuse coronary artery disease.From 1985 to 2002 isolated coronary artery endarterectomy with coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in 1,478 consecutive patients. The short-term outcomes were compared with concurrent series of conventional coronary artery bypass graft surgery, and risk factors for adverse outcomes after coronary endarterectomy were identified.Patients in the coronary endarterectomy group were of higher risk with increased incidence of comorbidities and three-vessel coronary disease. The operative mortality (3.2% versus control 2.2%; p = 0.03) and the incidence of major postoperative morbidity (not significant) were comparable between the groups. Prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time, recent acute myocardial infarction, redo surgery, and poor ventricular function were important predictors of in-hospital mortality. Vessel endarterectomized, technique of endarterectomy, and cardiopulmonary bypass versus off-pump technique did not alter results. At long-term follow-up, 5-year and 10-year survivals were 83% +/- 5%, and 74% +/- 3%, respectively, and freedom from angina at 5 and 10 years was 75% +/- 5%, and 69% +/- 4%, respectively, with 96% of survivors in New York Heart Association class II.In selected patients with diffuse coronary artery disease, coronary endarterectomy can be used as a tool for myocardial revascularization. The operative mortality and major morbidity were comparable or similar to coronary artery bypass grafting, and short-term and long-term results were favorable.

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