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Dr. Christopher  Schmitt  Md image

Dr. Christopher Schmitt Md

2123 Auburn Ave Suite 401
Cincinnati OH 45219
513 415-5489
Medical School: University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine - 1998
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 35.076958S
NPI: 1548210370
Taxonomy Codes:
207RC0200X 207RP1001X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Christopher Schmitt is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:31624 Description:Dx bronchoscope/lavage Average Price:$375.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$143.84
HCPCS Code:31500 Description:Insert emergency airway Average Price:$284.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$111.32
HCPCS Code:99291 Description:Critical care first hour Average Price:$387.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$216.11
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$340.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$193.79
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$232.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$132.20
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$257.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$157.42
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$176.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.01
HCPCS Code:94060 Description:Evaluation of wheezing Average Price:$83.65 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.43
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$165.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$101.34
HCPCS Code:94729 Description:C02/membane diffuse capacity Average Price:$68.29 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.91
HCPCS Code:94726 Description:Pulm funct tst plethysmograp Average Price:$67.27 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.99
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$122.94 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.99
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$180.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$126.18
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$120.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.61
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$110.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.47
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$109.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$75.47
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$68.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$37.76
HCPCS Code:94727 Description:Pulm function test by gas Average Price:$38.50 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.11
HCPCS Code:94060 Description:Evaluation of wheezing Average Price:$80.40 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$54.35
HCPCS Code:94729 Description:C02/membane diffuse capacity Average Price:$71.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$47.37
HCPCS Code:94726 Description:Pulm funct tst plethysmograp Average Price:$71.93 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$48.06
HCPCS Code:94375 Description:Respiratory flow volume loop Average Price:$52.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$37.27

HCPCS Code Definitions

94729
Diffusing capacity (eg, carbon monoxide, membrane) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
94729
Diffusing capacity (eg, carbon monoxide, membrane) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99291
Critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient; first 30-74 minutes
94727
Gas dilution or washout for determination of lung volumes and, when performed, distribution of ventilation and closing volumes
94726
Plethysmography for determination of lung volumes and, when performed, airway resistance
94375
Respiratory flow volume loop
94726
Plethysmography for determination of lung volumes and, when performed, airway resistance
94060
Bronchodilation responsiveness, spirometry as in 94010, pre- and post-bronchodilator administration
94060
Bronchodilation responsiveness, spirometry as in 94010, pre- and post-bronchodilator administration
31624
Bronchoscopy, rigid or flexible, including fluoroscopic guidance, when performed; with bronchial alveolar lavage
31500
Intubation, endotracheal, emergency procedure

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1497704936
Sleep Laboratory/Medicine
2,858
1740276823
Hematology/Oncology
2,155
1710911847
Hematology/Oncology
1,955
1427082841
Internal Medicine
1,713
1174513733
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,333
1881671766
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,279
1205838109
Internal Medicine
1,165
1134185481
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,123
1669426896
Diagnostic Radiology
949
1952349714
Diagnostic Radiology
925
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Schmitt has made to other doctors

Publications

Variable responses of human and non-human primate gut microbiomes to a Western diet. - Microbiome
The human gut microbiota interacts closely with human diet and physiology. To better understand the mechanisms behind this relationship, gut microbiome research relies on complementing human studies with manipulations of animal models, including non-human primates. However, due to unique aspects of human diet and physiology, it is likely that host-gut microbe interactions operate differently in humans and non-human primates.Here, we show that the human microbiome reacts differently to a high-protein, high-fat Western diet than that of a model primate, the African green monkey, or vervet (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus). Specifically, humans exhibit increased relative abundance of Firmicutes and reduced relative abundance of Prevotella on a Western diet while vervets show the opposite pattern. Predictive metagenomics demonstrate an increased relative abundance of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism in the microbiome of only humans consuming a Western diet.These results suggest that the human gut microbiota has unique properties that are a result of changes in human diet and physiology across evolution or that may have contributed to the evolution of human physiology. Therefore, the role of animal models for understanding the relationship between the human gut microbiota and host metabolism must be re-focused.
The genome of the vervet (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus). - Genome research
We describe a genome reference of the African green monkey or vervet (Chlorocebus aethiops). This member of the Old World monkey (OWM) superfamily is uniquely valuable for genetic investigations of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), for which it is the most abundant natural host species, and of a wide range of health-related phenotypes assessed in Caribbean vervets (C. a. sabaeus), whose numbers have expanded dramatically since Europeans introduced small numbers of their ancestors from West Africa during the colonial era. We use the reference to characterize the genomic relationship between vervets and other primates, the intra-generic phylogeny of vervet subspecies, and genome-wide structural variations of a pedigreed C. a. sabaeus population. Through comparative analyses with human and rhesus macaque, we characterize at high resolution the unique chromosomal fission events that differentiate the vervets and their close relatives from most other catarrhine primates, in whom karyotype is highly conserved. We also provide a summary of transposable elements and contrast these with the rhesus macaque and human. Analysis of sequenced genomes representing each of the main vervet subspecies supports previously hypothesized relationships between these populations, which range across most of sub-Saharan Africa, while uncovering high levels of genetic diversity within each. Sequence-based analyses of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms reveal extremely low diversity in Caribbean C. a. sabaeus vervets, compared to vervets from putatively ancestral West African regions. In the C. a. sabaeus research population, we discover the first structural variations that are, in some cases, predicted to have a deleterious effect; future studies will determine the phenotypic impact of these variations.© 2015 Warren et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
Localized population divergence of vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus spp.) in South Africa: Evidence from mtDNA. - American journal of physical anthropology
Vervet monkeys are common in most tree-rich areas of South Africa, but their absence from grassland and semi-desert areas of the country suggest potentially restricted and mosaic local population patterns that may have relevance to local phenotype patterns and selection. A portion of the mitochondrial DNA control region was sequenced to study patterns of genetic differentiation.DNA was extracted, and mitochondrial DNA sequences were obtained from 101 vervet monkeys at 15 localities, which represent both an extensive (widely across the distribution range) and intensive (more than one troop at most of the localities) sampling strategy. Analyses utilized Arlequin 3.1, MEGA 6, BEAST v1.5.2, and Network V3.6.1.The dataset contained 26 distinct haplotypes, with six populations fixed for single haplotypes. Pairwise P-distance among population pairs showed significant differentiation among most population pairs, but with nonsignificant differences among populations within some regions. Populations were grouped into three broad clusters in a maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree and a haplotype network. These clusters correspond to i) north-western, northern, and north-eastern parts of the distribution range as well as the northern coastal belt; ii) central areas of the country; and iii) southern part of the Indian Ocean coastal belt and adjacent inland areas.Apparent patterns of genetic structure correspond to current and past distribution of suitable habitat, geographic barriers to gene flow, geographic distance, and female philopatry. However, further work on nuclear markers and other genomic data are necessary to confirm these results.© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Bioaccumulation of Stentorin, the Probable Causative Agent for Discolored ("Purple") Eggs and Ovaries in Blue Catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) from Eufaula Lake, Oklahoma, USA. - Environmental science & technology
Observations of reddish to "purple" discolored eggs in the ovaries of adult female blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) from the northern arm of Eufaula Lake, a eutrophic multiuse impoundment in east-central Oklahoma, were first reported in 2006. Blue catfish eggs are normally cream to light yellow. Reports peaked in 2007-2008 and declined through 2009-2010; purple eggs have not been reported between 2010 and 2014. In the laboratory, all tissues and fluids of affected fish were strongly orange-red fluorescent under UV illumination, with the fluorescence most apparent in the lipid-rich ovaries and eggs. The causative agent was isolated chromatographically and confirmed by mass spectrometry as stentorin (1,3,4,6,8,10,11,13-octahydroxy-2,5-diisopropyl-phenanthro[1,10,9,8,o,p,q,r,a]perylene-7,14-dione), the fluorescent, lipophilic pigment associated with the photoreceptor protein of the ciliated protozoan Stentor coeruleus (Heterotrichea; Stentoridae). Larval medaka (Orizias latipes) readily consumed S. coeruleus in the laboratory and were observed to fluoresce in the same manner as the affected blue catfish. Potential deleterious effects of stentorin bioaccumulation remain to be determined, as do the geographic extent and the identities of other fluorescent compounds isolated from catfish eggs and ovaries.
Repression of arterial genes in hemogenic endothelium is sufficient for haematopoietic fate acquisition. - Nature communications
Changes in cell fate and identity are essential for endothelial-to-haematopoietic transition (EHT), an embryonic process that generates the first adult populations of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from hemogenic endothelial cells. Dissecting EHT regulation is a critical step towards the production of in vitro derived HSCs. Yet, we do not know how distinct endothelial and haematopoietic fates are parsed during the transition. Here we show that genes required for arterial identity function later to repress haematopoietic fate. Tissue-specific, temporally controlled, genetic loss of arterial genes (Sox17 and Notch1) during EHT results in increased production of haematopoietic cells due to loss of Sox17-mediated repression of haematopoietic transcription factors (Runx1 and Gata2). However, the increase in EHT can be abrogated by increased Notch signalling. These findings demonstrate that the endothelial haematopoietic fate switch is actively repressed in a population of endothelial cells, and that derepression of these programs augments haematopoietic output.
The static allometry of sexual and non-sexual traits in vervet monkeys. - Biological journal of the Linnean Society. Linnean Society of London
Sexual traits vary tremendously in static allometry. This variation may be explained in part by body size-related differences in the strength of selection. We tested this hypothesis with in two populations of vervet monkeys, using estimates of the level of condition dependence for different morphological traits as a proxy for body size-related variation in the strength of selection. In support of the hypothesis, we found that the steepness of allometric slopes increased with the level of condition dependence. One trait of particular interest, the penis, had shallow allometric slopes and low levels of condition dependence, in agreement with one of the most consistent patterns yet detected in the study of allometry, that of genitalia exhibitting shallow allometries.
Predation risk sensitivity and the spatial organization of primate groups: a case study using GIS in lowland Woolly Monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha poeppigii). - American journal of physical anthropology
Predation risk is thought to be a potent force influencing intragroup cohesion, and the level of risk experienced by an individual is expected to vary with both group size and spatial position within a group. Smaller-bodied and less-experienced individuals are presumed to be more vulnerable to predators, suggesting that within-group spatial organization should show size- and age-dependent patterns in predator sensitive positioning. However, such effects have been difficult to evaluate for arboreal primates living in large groups. We conducted a preliminary study using a novel, spatially explicit method of assessing group spatial organization using GIS data in two groups of wild lowland Woolly monkeys, in which one group had a membership roughly twice as large as the second. In the larger group, group spread was more diffuse and large adult males were more frequently on the outskirts of the group than other age/sex classes, while immatures and females with dependents were more often in the center. Leaf cover around an individual-presumed to index an animal's perception of risk-increased significantly with distance from the group center for all immatures, although they were typically under lower leaf cover than adults; the number of groupmates in proximity also had an effect, but nearest neighbor distance did not. These differences were not detectable in the smaller group. This preliminary study suggests that thorough studies of spatial organization and predation risk sensitivity in arboreal primates are possible and could yield valuable information on how gregarious individuals offset ecological risks through social spacing.© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
From transplantation to transgenics: mouse models of developmental hematopoiesis. - Experimental hematology
The mouse is integral to our understanding of hematopoietic biology. Serving as a mammalian model system, the mouse has allowed for the discovery of self-renewing multipotent stem cells, provided functional assays to establish hematopoietic stem cell identity and function, and has become a tool for understanding the differentiation capacity of early hematopoietic progenitors. The advent of genetic technology has strengthened the use of mouse models for identifying critical pathways in hematopoiesis. Full genetic knockout models, tissue-specific gene deletion, and genetic overexpression models create a system for the dissection and identification of critical cellular and genetic processes underlying hematopoiesis. However, the murine model has also introduced perplexity in understanding developmental hematopoiesis. Requisite in utero development paired with circulation has historically made defining sites of origin and expansion in the murine hematopoietic system challenging. However, the genetic accessibility of the mouse as a mammalian system has identified key regulators of hematopoietic development. Technological advances continue to generate extremely powerful tools that when translated to the murine system provide refined in vivo spatial and temporal control of genetic deletion or overexpression. Future advancements may add the ability of reversible genetic manipulation. In this review, we describe the major contributions of the murine model to our understanding of hematopoiesis.Copyright © 2014 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
The rise and fall of a genus: Complete mtDNA genomes shed light on the phylogenetic position of yellow-tailed woolly monkeys, Lagothrix flavicauda, and on the evolutionary history of the family Atelidae (Primates: Platyrrhini). - Molecular phylogenetics and evolution
Using complete mitochondrial genome sequences, we provide the first molecular analysis of the phylogenetic position of the yellow-tailed woolly monkey, Lagothrix flavicauda (a.k.a. Oreonax flavicauda), a critically endangered neotropical primate endemic to northern Perú. The taxonomic status and phylogenetic position of yellow-tailed woolly monkeys have been debated for many years, but in this study both Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic reconstructions unequivocally support a monophyletic woolly monkey clade that includes L. flavicauda as the basal taxon within the radiation. Bayesian dating analyses using several alternative calibrations suggest that the divergence of yellow-tailed woolly monkeys from other Lagothrix occurred in the Pleistocene, ∼2.1Ma, roughly 6.5 my after the divergence of woolly monkeys from their sister genus, Brachyteles. Additionally, comparative analysis of the cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 (COX2) gene shows that genetic distances between yellow-tailed woolly monkeys and other Lagothrix from across the genus' geographic distribution fall well within the range of between-species divergences seen in a large number of other platyrrhine primate genera at the same locus and outside the range of between-genus divergences. Our results thus confirm a position within Lagothrix for the yellow-tailed woolly monkey and strongly suggest that the name Oreonax be formally considered a synonym for this genus. This revision in taxonomic status does not change the dire conservation threats facing the yellow-tailed woolly monkey in Perú, where the remaining wild population is estimated at only ∼10,000 individuals living in a highly fragmented landscape.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Factors associated with siman immunodeficiency virus transmission in a natural African nonhuman primate host in the wild. - Journal of virology
African green monkeys (AGMs) are naturally infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) at high prevalence levels and do not progress to AIDS. Sexual transmission is the main transmission route in AGM, while mother-to-infant transmission (MTIT) is negligible. We investigated SIV transmission in wild AGMs to assess whether or not high SIV prevalence is due to differences in mucosal permissivity to SIV (i.e., whether the genetic bottleneck of viral transmission reported in humans and macaques is also observed in AGMs in the wild). We tested 121 sabaeus AGMs (Chlorocebus sabaeus) from the Gambia and found that 53 were SIV infected (44%). By combining serology and viral load quantitation, we identified 4 acutely infected AGMs, in which we assessed the diversity of the quasispecies by single-genome amplification (SGA) and documented that a single virus variant established the infections. We thus show that natural SIV transmission in the wild is associated with a genetic bottleneck similar to that described for mucosal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in humans. Flow cytometry assessment of the immune cell populations did not identify major differences between infected and uninfected AGM. The expression of the SIV coreceptor CCR5 on CD4+ T cells dramatically increased in adults, being higher in infected than in uninfected infant and juvenile AGMs. Thus, the limited SIV MTIT in natural hosts appears to be due to low target cell availability in newborns and infants, which supports HIV MTIT prevention strategies aimed at limiting the target cells at mucosal sites. Combined, (i) the extremely high prevalence in sexually active AGMs, (ii) the very efficient SIV transmission in the wild, and (iii) the existence of a fraction of multiparous females that remain uninfected in spite of massive exposure to SIV identify wild AGMs as an acceptable model of exposed, uninfected individuals.We report an extensive analysis of the natural history of SIVagm infection in its sabaeus monkey host, the African green monkey species endemic to West Africa. Virtually no study has investigated the natural history of SIV infection in the wild. The novelty of our approach is that we report for the first time that SIV infection has no discernible impact on the major immune cell populations in natural hosts, thus confirming the nonpathogenic nature of SIV infection in the wild. We also focused on the correlates of SIV transmission, and we report, also for the first time, that SIV transmission in the wild is characterized by a major genetic bottleneck, similar to that described for HIV-1 transmission in humans. Finally, we report here that the restriction of target cell availability is a major correlate of the lack of SIV transmission to the offspring in natural hosts of SIVs.

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2123 Auburn Ave Suite 401 Cincinnati, OH 45219
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