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Dr. Daphna  Kilion  Md image

Dr. Daphna Kilion Md

444 West Main Street
Patchogue NY 11772
631 755-5250
Medical School: State University Of New York Health Science Center Of Syracuse - 1987
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 177438
NPI: 1528159829
Taxonomy Codes:
207VG0400X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Daphna Kilion is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:57505 Description:Endocervical curettage Average Price:$400.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$114.21
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$300.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$224.00
HCPCS Code:57150 Description:Treat vagina infection Average Price:$100.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$53.20
HCPCS Code:77080 Description:Dxa bone density axial Average Price:$50.99 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.12
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$175.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$157.35
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$80.87 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$79.75

HCPCS Code Definitions

57505
Endocervical curettage (not done as part of a dilation and curettage)
57150
Irrigation of vagina and/or application of medicament for treatment of bacterial, parasitic, or fungoid disease
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
77080
Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bone density study, 1 or more sites; axial skeleton (eg, hips, pelvis, spine)
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1932195138
Hematology/Oncology
595
1952314650
Diagnostic Radiology
512
1629033709
Internal Medicine
463
1700880465
Hematology/Oncology
456
1437206943
Family Practice
395
1427070655
Obstetrics/Gynecology
345
1720014574
Ophthalmology
333
1861659823
General Surgery
279
1366446726
Hematology/Oncology
229
1235112301
Diagnostic Radiology
215
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Kilion has made to other doctors

Publications

The role of the cholinergic system in the signal attenuation rat model of obsessive-compulsive disorder. - Psychopharmacology
In comparison to studies of the involvement of the serotonergic, dopaminergic, and glutamatergic systems in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), research on the involvement of the cholinergic system in this disorder has remained sparse.The aim of this study was to test the role of the cholinergic system in compulsive behavior using the signal attenuation rat model of OCD. In this model, "compulsive" behavior is induced by attenuating a signal indicating that a lever-press response was effective in producing food.The acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine (0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 mg/kg), the nicotinic agonist nicotine (0.03, 0.06, 0.10, 0.30, 0.60, and 1.00 mg/kg), the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (1, 3, 5, and 8 mg/kg), the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine (0.0075, 0.0150, and 0.0300 mg/kg), and the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (0.15, 0.50, 1.00, and 1.50 mg/kg) were acutely administered to rats just before assessing their lever-press responding following signal attenuation (experiments 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9, respectively). Because the effects of signal attenuation are assessed under extinction conditions, drug doses that were effective in the above experiments were also tested in an extinction session of lever-press responding that was not preceded by signal attenuation (experiments 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10).Acute systemic administration of the cholinergic agents did not exert a selective anti- or pro-compulsive effect in the signal attenuation model.Acetylcholine does not seem to play a role in the signal attenuation rat model of OCD.
Stiffening of rabbit corneas by the bacteriochlorophyll derivative WST11 using near infrared light. - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
We evaluated the efficacy and safety of photochemical corneal stiffening by palladium bacteriochlorin 13'-(2-sulfoethyl)amide dipotassium salt (WST11) and near infrared (NIR) illumination, using ex vivo and in vivo rabbit eye models.Corneas of post mortem rabbits and living rabbits were pretreated topically with 2.5 mg/mL WST11 in saline or in 20% dextran T-500 (WST-D), washed and illuminated with an NIR diode laser (755 nm, 10 mW/cm(2). Studies with corneas of untreated fellow eyes served as controls. Tensile strength measurements, histopathology, electron spin resonance, and optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy were used to assess treatment effects. Comparative studies were performed with standard riboflavin/ultraviolet-A light (UVA) treatment.WST11/NIR treatment significantly increased corneal stiffness following ex vivo or in vivo treatment, compared to untreated contralateral eyes. The incremental ultimate stress and Young's modulus of treated corneas increased by 45, 113, 115%, and 10, 79, and 174% following 10, 20, and 30 minutes of incubation with WST11, respectively. WST-D/NIR had a similar stiffening effect, but markedly reduced post-treatment edema and shorter time of epithelial healing. WST11/NIR and WST-D/NIR generate hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, but no singlet oxygen in the cornea. Histology demonstrated a reduction in the keratocyte population in the anterior half of the corneal stroma, without damage to the endothelium.Treatment of rabbit corneas, with either WST11/NIR or WST-D/NIR, increases their biomechanical strength through a mechanism that does not involve singlet oxygen. The WST-D/NIR treatment showed less adverse effects, demonstrating a new potential for clinical use in keratoconus and corneal ectasia after refractive surgery.
Long-term functional consequences of quinolinic acid striatal lesions and their alteration following an addition of a globus pallidus lesion assessed using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging. - Experimental neurology
The present study tested the hypothesis that lesion to the rat globus pallidus (GP) can "normalize" the functioning of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits in striatal-lesioned rats by assessing the functional connectivity of these regions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Changes in brain activation following systemic administration of amphetamine were assessed in (1) rats sustaining a unilateral lesion to the striatum, (2) rats sustaining a combined striatal and pallidal lesion, and (3) control rats. Striatal-lesioned rats showed attenuated cortical activation following amphetamine administration and lower correlations between the responses to amphetamine in different brain regions compared to control rats. Although the addition of an excitotoxic GP lesion failed to prevent striatal lesion-induced attenuation of cortical activation by amphetamine, it was effective in "normalizing" the correlations between the responses to amphetamine in the different areas. These results suggest that, although the GP lesion is ineffective in correcting the global changes in activity caused by the striatal lesion, it may have the capacity to partially restore alterations in functional connectivity resulting from the striatal lesion. These results are further discussed in view of our previous demonstration that lesions to the GP can reverse several behavioral deficits produced by a striatal lesion.
Association of myeloperoxidase with heparin: oxidative inactivation of proteins on the surface of endothelial cells by the bound enzyme. - Molecular and cellular biochemistry
Chromatography of human myeloperoxidase (MPO) on a heparin-agarose column demonstrated a tight association of the protein with the resin. The electrophoretic mobility of mixtures of MPO and heparin in polyacrylamide gels under nondenaturing conditions was consistent with a strong interaction of the cationic enzyme with the polyanionic polysaccharide. Purified MPO prebound to bovine aorta endothelial cells (BAEC) and supplemented with hydrogen peroxide dose- and time-dependently abrogated the interaction of coagulation factor IX (FIX) with factor IX-binding protein (FIXBP) on the surface of BAEC reflecting oxidative modification of the binding protein. This inactivation of FIXBP required the presence of chloride implicating hypochlorite in the reaction. Hypochlorite and activated neutrophils exerted a similar effect. The oxidative modification of FIXBP was only partially dependent on the addition of hydrogen peroxide and was abolished by exogenous heparin which displaced MPO from the cell surface, emphasizing the functional differences between cell-bound and free enzyme.
Identification and partial purification of human T lymphocyte colony-enhancing factor (LCEF), distinct from T cell-growth factor. - Immunology
Colony growth of T lymphocytes in a soft agar culture system, following stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), is enhanced by T cell-derived conditioned medium (CM). The putative enhancing factor present in this CM has been termed lymphocyte colony-enhancing factor (LCEF). The purification of LCEF from CM has been complicated by the fact that active CM could be obtained only in the presence of 7-8 mg/ml of serum proteins. In order to circumvent this problem, CM which was shown to be active in the colony formation assay, was produced in the presence of a serum fraction precipitated by 1.6 M ammonium sulphate (AS). The first step of the purification of this CM was fractionation by 1.6 M AS, whereby the active material was fully recovered in the supernatant. The 20-fold purified material was applied on a DEAE-cellulose column. Two peaks of activity were obtained using the colony formation assay. The purification achieved by this second step was 5-10 fold for the first peak, eluting around 0.06 M NaCl, and two- to three-fold for the second peak, eluting around 0.19 M NaCl. Two peaks of activity were also obtained upon hydrophobic chromatography on a phenyl-Sepharose column, with enhancement factors of 5-8 for the first peak and 25-60 for the second peak. These results imply the presence of more than one LCEF molecule in the original CM. None of the LCEF-active fractions contained any T cell-growth factor (TCGF) activity; LCEF seems therefore to be a molecular entity distinct from TCGF.

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