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Dr. Michael  Underwood  Md image

Dr. Michael Underwood Md

900 N Owen Walters Blvd
Salina OK 74365
918 348-8500
Medical School: University Of Oklahoma College Of Medicine - 1994
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 19531
NPI: 1528050085
Taxonomy Codes:
207Q00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Michael Underwood is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$119.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$72.20
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$64.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$23.75
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$82.78 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$47.00

HCPCS Code Definitions

99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1770574253
Diagnostic Radiology
211
1326096850
Diagnostic Radiology
196
1043214497
Diagnostic Radiology
137
1699758961
Diagnostic Radiology
133
1306820550
Geriatric Medicine
120
1801877055
Diagnostic Radiology
105
1396735148
Emergency Medicine
104
1538109087
Diagnostic Radiology
101
1013914456
Diagnostic Radiology
100
1215986807
Emergency Medicine
94
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Underwood has made to other doctors

Publications

Nutrition and Physical Activity Strategies for Cancer Prevention in Current National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans. - Journal of community health
Obesity, diet and physical inactivity are risk factors for some cancers. Grantees of the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) in US states, tribes, and territories develop plans to coordinate funding and activities for cancer prevention and control. Including information and goals related to nutrition and physical activity (NPA) is a key opportunity for primary cancer prevention, but it is currently unclear to what extent NCCCP plans address these issues. We reviewed 69 NCCCP plans and searched for terms related to NPA. Plans were coded as (1) knowledge of NPA and cancer link; (2) goals to improve NPA behaviors; and (3) strategies to increase healthy NPA activities, environments, or systems changes. NPA content was consistently included in all cancer plans examined across all years. Only 4 (6 %) outlined only the relationship between NPA and cancer without goals or strategies. Fifty-nine plans (89 %) contained goals or strategies related to NPA, with 53 (82 %) including both. However, numbers of goals, strategies, and detail provided varied widely. All programs recognized the importance of NPA in cancer prevention. Most plans included NPA goals and strategies. Increasing the presence of NPA strategies that can be modified or adapted appropriately locally could help with more widespread implementation and measurement of NPA interventions.
Evaluating Early Case Capture of Pediatric Cancers in Seven Central Cancer Registries in the United States, 2013. - Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974)
Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in children, but incidence data are not available until two years after diagnosis, thereby delaying data dissemination and research. An early case capture (ECC) surveillance program was piloted in seven state cancer registries to register pediatric cancer cases within 30 days of diagnosis. We sought to determine the quality of ECC data and understand pilot implementation.We used quantitative and qualitative methods to evaluate ECC. We assessed data quality by comparing demographic and clinical characteristics from the initial ECC submission to a resubmission of ECC pilot data and to the most recent year of routinely collected cancer data for each state individually and in aggregate. We conducted telephone focus groups with registry staff to determine ECC practices and difficulties in August and September 2013. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded to identify themes.Comparing ECC initial submissions with submissions for all states, ECC data were nationally representative for age (9.7 vs. 9.9 years) and sex (673 of 1,324 [50.9%] vs. 42,609 of 80,547 [52.9%] male cases), but not for primary site (472 of 1,324 [35.7%] vs. 27,547 of 80,547 [34.2%] leukemia/lymphoma cases), behavior (1,219 of 1,324 [92.1%] vs. 71,525 of 80,547 [88.8%] malignant cases), race/ethnicity (781 of 1,324 [59.0%] vs. 64,518 of 80,547 [80.1%] white cases), or diagnostic confirmation (1,233 of 1,324 [93.2%] vs. 73,217 of 80,547 [90.9%] microscopically confirmed cases). When comparing initial ECC data with resubmission data, differences were seen in race/ethnicity (808 of 1,324 [61.1%] vs. 1,425 of 1,921 [74.2%] white cases), primary site (475 of 1,324 [35.9%] vs. 670 of 1,921 [34.9%] leukemia/lymphoma cases), and behavior (1,215 of 1,324 [91.8%] vs. 1,717 of 1,921 [89.4%] malignant cases). Common themes from focus group analysis included implementation challenges and facilitators, benefits of ECC, and utility of ECC data.ECC provided data rapidly and reflected national data overall with differences in several data elements. ECC also expanded cancer reporting infrastructure and increased data completeness and timeliness. Although challenges related to timeliness and increased work burden remain, indications suggest that researchers may reliably use these data for pediatric cancer studies.
Evidence-Based Cancer Survivorship Activities for Comprehensive Cancer Control. - American journal of preventive medicine
One of six priorities of CDC's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is to address the needs of cancer survivors within the local population served by individually funded states, tribes, and territories. This report examines cancer survivorship activities implemented in five NCCCP grantees, which have initiated evidence-based activities outlined in A National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship: Advancing Public Health Strategies (NAP).NCCCP action plans, submitted annually to CDC, from 2010 to 2014 were reviewed in February 2015 to assess implementation of cancer survivorship activities and recommended strategies consistent with the NAP. Four state-level and one tribal grantee with specific activities related to one of each of the four NAP strategies were chosen for inclusion. Brief case reports describing the initiation and impact of implemented activities were developed in collaboration with each grantee program director.New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa programs each implemented activities in surveillance and applied research; communication, education, and training; programs, policies, and infrastructure; and access to quality care and services.This report provides examples for incorporating cancer survivorship activities within Comprehensive Cancer Control programs of various sizes, demographic makeup, and resource capacity. New Mexico, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington state, and Fond Du Lac Band developed creative cancer survivorship activities that meet CDC recommendations. NCCCP grantees can follow these examples by implementing evidence-based survivorship interventions that meet the needs of their specific populations.Published by Elsevier Inc.
Establishment of a cancer surveillance programme: the South African experience. - The Lancet. Oncology
Cancer is projected to become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low-income and middle-income countries in the future. However, cancer incidence in South Africa is largely under-reported because of a lack of nationwide cancer surveillance networks. We describe present cancer surveillance activities in South Africa, and use the International Agency for Research on Cancer framework to propose the development of four population-based cancer registries in South Africa. These registries will represent the ethnic and geographical diversity of the country. We also provide an update on a cancer surveillance pilot programme in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan District, and the successes and challenges in the implementation of the IARC framework in a local context. We examine the development of a comprehensive cancer surveillance system in a middle-income country, which might serve to assist other countries in establishing population-based cancer registries in a resource-constrained environment.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
An evaluation of cancer survivorship activities across national comprehensive cancer control programs. - Journal of cancer survivorship : research and practice
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) funds states, the District of Columbia, tribal organizations, territories, and jurisdictions across the USA develop and implement jurisdiction-specific comprehensive cancer control (CCC) plans. The objective of this study was to analyze NCCCP action plan data for incorporation and appropriateness of cancer survivorship-specific goals and objectives.In August 2013, NCCCP action plans maintained within CDC's Chronic Disease Management Information System (CDMIS) from years 2010 to 2013 were reviewed to assess the inclusion of cancer survivorship objectives. We used the CDMIS search engine to identify "survivorship" within each plan and calculated the proportion of programs that incorporate cancer survivorship-related content during the study period and in each individual year. Cancer survivorship objectives were then categorized by compatibility with nationally accepted, recommended strategies from the report A National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship: Advancing Public Health Strategies (NAP).From 2010 to 2013, 94% (n = 65) of NCCCP action plans contained survivorship content in at least 1 year during the time period and 38% (n = 26) of all NCCCP action plans addressed cancer survivorship every year during the study period. Nearly 64% (n = 44) of NCCCP action plans included cancer survivorship objectives recommended in NAP.Nearly all NCCCP action plans addressed cancer survivorship from 2010 to 2013, and most programs implemented recommended cancer survivorship efforts during the time period.NCCCP grantees can improve cancer survivorship support by incorporating recommended efforts within each year of their plans.
Tobacco cessation among users of telephone and web-based interventions--four states, 2011-2012. - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Smoking caused an average of 480,000 deaths per year in the United States from 2005 to 2009, and three in 10 cancer deaths in the United States are tobacco related. Tobacco cessation is a high public health priority, and all states offer some form of tobacco cessation service. Quitlines provide telephone-based counseling services and are an effective intervention for tobacco cessation. In addition to telephone services, 96% of all U.S. quitlines offer Web-based cessation services. Evidence is limited on the number of tobacco users who use more than one type of service, and studies report mixed results on whether combined telephone and Web-based counseling improves long-term cessation compared with telephone alone. CDC conducted a survey of users of telephone and Web-based cessation services in four states to determine the cessation success of users of these interventions. After adjusting for multiple variables, persons who used both telephone and Web-based services were more likely to report abstinence from smoking for 30 days at follow up (odds ratio = 1.3) compared with telephone-only users and with Web-only users (odds ratio = 1.5). These findings suggest that states might consider offering both types of cessation services to increase cessation success.
Decreasing trend in tobacco-related cancer incidence, United States 2005-2009. - Journal of community health
More than 1 in 3 cancer-related deaths are associated with tobacco use; these include cancers of the lung and bronchus, oral cavity and pharynx, larynx, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, kidney and renal pelvis, urinary bladder, and cervix, and acute myeloid leukemia. In order to characterize the current cancer burden due to tobacco use, this study provides recent trends in tobacco-related cancer incidence across the US. We analyzed data from CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries and NCI's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program, covering 100% of the US population during 2005-2009. Age-adjusted incidence rates, 95% confidence intervals and annual percent change were calculated for each state, the District of Columbia, and the US. Tobacco-related cancer incidence in the US decreased significantly from 152.9 (per 100,000 persons) in 2005 to 145.8 in 2009. Men had higher incidence rates, but a greater decrease in tobacco-related cancers per year over the 5-year time period (-1.4% in men, compared to -0.8% in women). Incidence rates decreased the most per year for larynx (-2.4%), lung and bronchus (-1.9%) and stomach (-1.5%) cancers during the study period. Tobacco-related cancer incidence trends varied by state. While tobacco-related cancer incidence in the United States decreased overall from 2005 to 2009, tobacco continued to account for a large cancer burden. Our findings suggest that continued efforts in tobacco prevention and control are needed to further reduce tobacco-related cancer burden in general and among targeted sub-populations in the US.
Lung cancer deaths among American Indians and Alaska Natives, 1990-2009. - American journal of public health
We examined regional differences in lung cancer among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) using linked data sets to minimize racial misclassification.On the basis of federal lung cancer incidence data for 1999 to 2009 and deaths for 1990 to 2009 linked with Indian Health Service (IHS) registration records, we calculated age-adjusted incidence and death rates for non-Hispanic AI/AN and White persons by IHS region, focusing on Contract Health Service Delivery Area (CHSDA) counties. We correlated death rates with cigarette smoking prevalence and calculated mortality-to-incidence ratios.Lung cancer death rates among AI/AN persons in CHSDA counties varied across IHS regions, from 94.0 per 100,000 in the Northern Plains to 15.2 in the Southwest, reflecting the strong correlation between smoking and lung cancer. For every 100 lung cancers diagnosed, there were 6 more deaths among AI/AN persons than among White persons. Lung cancer death rates began to decline in 1997 among AI/AN men and are still increasing among AI/AN women.Comparison of regional lung cancer death rates between AI/AN and White populations indicates disparities in tobacco control and prevention interventions. Efforts should be made to ensure that AI/AN persons receive equal benefit from current and emerging lung cancer prevention and control interventions.
Lung cancer incidence trends among men and women--United States, 2005-2009. - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death and the second most commonly diagnosed cancer (excluding skin cancer) among men and women in the United States. Although lung cancer can be caused by environmental exposures, most efforts to prevent lung cancer emphasize tobacco control because 80%-90% of lung cancers are attributed to cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke. One sentinel health consequence of tobacco use is lung cancer, and one way to measure the impact of tobacco control is by examining trends in lung cancer incidence rates, particularly among younger adults. Changes in lung cancer rates among younger adults likely reflect recent changes in risk exposure. To assess lung cancer incidence and trends among men and women by age group, CDC used data from the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program for the period 2005-2009, the most recent data available. During the study period, lung cancer incidence decreased among men in all age groups except <35 years and decreased among women aged 35-44 years and 54-64 years. Lung cancer incidence decreased more rapidly among men than among women and more rapidly among adults aged 35-44 years than among other age groups. To further reduce lung cancer incidence in the United States, proven population-based tobacco prevention and control strategies should receive sustained attention and support.
An update on tobacco control initiatives in comprehensive cancer control plans. - Preventing chronic disease
Comprehensive cancer control (CCC) coalitions address tobacco use, the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, through formal plans to guide tobacco control activities and other cancer prevention strategies. Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs (Best Practices) and The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide) are used to assist with this effort. We examined CCC plans to determine the extent to which they followed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) tobacco control and funding recommendations.We obtained 69 CCC plans, current as of August 1, 2011, to determine which CDC recommendations from Best Practices and The Community Guide were incorporated. Data were abstracted through a content review and key word search and then summarized across the plans with dichotomous indicators. Additionally, we analyzed plans for inclusion of tobacco control funding goals and strategies.CCC plans incorporated a mean 4.5 (standard deviation [SD], 2.1) of 5 recommendations from Best Practices and 5.2 (SD, 0.9) of 10 recommendations from The Community Guide. Two-thirds of plans (66.7%) addressed funding for tobacco control as a strategy or action item; 47.8% of those plans (31.9% of total) defined a specific, measurable funding goal.Although most CCC plans follow CDC-recommended tobacco control recommendations and funding levels, not all recommendations are addressed by every plan and certain recommendations are addressed in varying numbers of plans. Clearer prioritization of tobacco control recommendations by CDC may improve the extent to which they are followed and therefore maximize their public health benefit.

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900 N Owen Walters Blvd Salina, OK 74365
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