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Dr. Carrie  Marshall  Md image

Dr. Carrie Marshall Md

12605 E 16Th Ave
Aurora CO 80045
720 480-0000
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 47578
NPI: 1508912106
Taxonomy Codes:
207ZP0102X

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Publications

Respiratory Cytology-Current Trends Including Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy and Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy: Analysis of Data From a 2013 Supplemental Survey of Participants in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Co - Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
Context .- Nongynecologic cytology (NGC) practices are expanding in relationship to historical gynecologic cytology screening programs. Bronchopulmonary cytology is experiencing an evolution regarding new procedural types. The College of American Pathologists (CAP) tracks practice patterns in NGC by developing questionnaires, surveying participants, and analyzing respondent data. Objective .- To analyze responses to a 2013 CAP supplemental survey from the Interlaboratoy Comparison Program on bronchopulmonary NGC. Design .- The "NGC 2013 Supplemental Questionnaire: Demographics in Performance and Reporting of Respiratory Cytology" was mailed to 2074 laboratories. Results .- The survey response rate was 42% (880 of 2074) with 90% of respondents (788 of 880) indicating that their laboratories evaluated cytology bronchopulmonary specimens. More than 95% of respondents indicated interpreting bronchial washings (765 of 787) and bronchial brushings (757 of 787). A minority of laboratories (43%, 340 of 787) dealt with endobronchial ultrasound-guided samples, and an even smaller fraction of laboratories (14%, 110 of 787) saw cases from electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy. Intraprocedural adequacy assessments by pathologists (and less often by cytotechnologists or pathologists-in-training) were routinely performed in percutaneous transthoracic aspiration cases (74%, 413 of 560) with less involvement for other case types. Most laboratories reported that newly diagnosed primary pulmonary adenocarcinomas were triaged for molecular testing of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase. Conclusions .- The parameters examined in this 2013 survey provide a snapshot of current pulmonary cytopathology practice and may be used as benchmarks in the future.
The clinical impact of immediate on-site cytopathology evaluation during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of pancreatic masses: a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial. - The American journal of gastroenterology
Observational data on the impact of on-site cytopathology evaluation (OCE) during endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic masses have reported conflicting results. We aimed to compare the diagnostic yield of malignancy and proportion of inadequate specimens between patients undergoing EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses with and without OCE.In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, consecutive patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent randomization for EUS-FNA with or without OCE. The number of FNA passes in the OCE+ arm was dictated by the on-site cytopathologist, whereas seven passes were performed in OCE- arm. EUS-FNA protocol was standardized, and slides were reviewed by cytopathologists using standardized criteria for cytologic characteristics and diagnosis.A total of 241 patients (121 OCE+, 120 OCE-) were included. There was no difference between the two groups in diagnostic yield of malignancy (OCE+ 75.2% vs. OCE- 71.6%, P=0.45) and proportion of inadequate specimens (9.8 vs. 13.3%, P=0.31). Procedures in OCE+ group required fewer EUS-FNA passes (median, OCE+ 4 vs. OCE- 7, P<0.0001). There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to overall procedure time, adverse events, number of repeat procedures, costs (based on baseline cost-minimization analysis), and accuracy (using predefined criteria for final diagnosis of malignancy). There was no difference between the two groups with respect to cytologic characteristics of cellularity, bloodiness, number of cells/slide, and contamination.Results of this study demonstrated no significant difference in the diagnostic yield of malignancy, proportion of inadequate specimens, and accuracy in patients with pancreatic mass undergoing EUS-FNA with or without OCE.
Occupation and the process of transition from homelessness. - Canadian journal of occupational therapy. Revue canadienne d'ergothérapie
The incorporation of meaningful activity or occupation in supporting those transitioning from homelessness to being housed has been promoted by researchers; however, there is little evidence to support the promotion of initiatives encouraging its use in support models.This manuscript aims to advocate for further research into the role of occupation in supporting persons transitioning from homelessness to permanent housing.The transition from homelessness to becoming housed can be facilitated through use of occupation as a way of promoting the security of meaningful roles and a "housed identity" among persons experiencing homelessness.By promoting an emphasis on occupation, persons experiencing homelessness may undergo a positive change in identity. This change may improve housing tenure and the likelihood of a more permanent transition away from homelessness. More research is required to identify the relationship between occupation and the transition from homelessness.
An evolved Mxe GyrA intein for enhanced production of fusion proteins. - ACS chemical biology
Expressing antibodies as fusions to the non-self-cleaving Mxe GyrA intein enables site-specific, carboxy-terminal chemical modification of the antibodies by expressed protein ligation (EPL). Bacterial antibody-intein fusion protein expression platforms typically yield insoluble inclusion bodies that require refolding to obtain active antibody-intein fusion proteins. Previously, we demonstrated that it was possible to employ yeast surface display to express properly folded single-chain antibody (scFv)-intein fusions, therefore permitting the direct small-scale chemical functionalization of scFvs. Here, directed evolution of the Mxe GyrA intein was performed to improve both the display and secretion levels of scFv-intein fusion proteins from yeast. The engineered intein was shown to increase the yeast display levels of eight different scFvs by up to 3-fold. Additionally, scFv- and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-intein fusion proteins can be secreted from yeast, and while fusion of the scFvs to the wild-type intein resulted in low expression levels, the engineered intein increased scFv-intein production levels by up to 30-fold. The secreted scFv- and GFP-intein fusion proteins retained their respective binding and fluorescent activities, and upon intein release, EPL resulted in carboxy-terminal azide functionalization of the target proteins. The azide-functionalized scFvs and GFP were subsequently employed in a copper-free, strain-promoted click reaction to site-specifically immobilize the proteins on surfaces, and it was demonstrated that the functionalized, immobilized scFvs retained their antigen binding specificity. Taken together, the evolved yeast intein platform provides a robust alternative to bacterial intein expression systems.
Prior high-risk human papillomavirus testing and Papanicolaou test results of 70 invasive cervical carcinomas diagnosed in 2012: results of a retrospective multicenter study. - Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection is essential for the development of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions. High-risk HPV testing has a higher sensitivity than cytology does for detecting cervical epithelial lesions. However, a large study from a single institution showed 31% of patients with invasive cervical cancer had negative baseline hrHPV testing within 5 years preceding the diagnosis.To investigate the limitation of hrHPV testing in detecting invasive cervical cancer.Cases from 2012 with a histologic diagnosis of invasive cervical carcinoma were retrieved from multiple institutions. From those records, prior hrHPV testing and Papanicolaou test results in the 5 years before the cancer diagnosis were recorded.Seventy patients with cervical carcinoma were included in the study. Negative HPV test result rates were 9% (5 of 53), 23% (6 of 26), and 25% (2 of 8) during the periods of less than 1 year, 1 to 3 years, and 3 to 5 years before the histologic diagnoses, respectively. Negative Papanicolaou testing results in the same time intervals were 3.4% (2 of 59), 33% (10 of 30), and 40% (6 of 15). Although the HPV(-) rate seemed to be different among different HPV test methods, no statistical significance was detected because of small sample size. Negative hrHPV rates in patients with adenocarcinoma were similar to those in patients with squamous cell carcinoma.These data expose limitations for the potential use of primary HPV testing. In addition, current screening guidelines recommending cotesting at 5-year intervals should be evaluated further with additional historic data collection because there are women with negative results for both Papanicolaou tests and hrHPV testing within the period of 3 to 5 years before an invasive carcinoma diagnosis.
Facile chemical functionalization of proteins through intein-linked yeast display. - Bioconjugate chemistry
Intein-mediated expressed protein ligation (EPL) permits the site-specific chemical customization of proteins. While traditional techniques have used purified, soluble proteins, we have extended these methods to release and modify intein fusion proteins expressed on the yeast surface, thereby eliminating the need for soluble protein expression and purification. To this end, we sought to simultaneously release yeast surface-displayed proteins and selectively conjugate with chemical functionalities compatible with EPL and click chemistry. Single-chain antibodies (scFv) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) were displayed on the yeast surface as fusions to the N-terminus of the Mxe GyrA intein. ScFv and GFP were released from the yeast surface with either a sulfur nucleophile (MESNA) or a nitrogen nucleophile (hydrazine) linked to an azido group. The hydrazine azide permitted the simultaneous release and azido functionalization of displayed proteins, but nonspecific reactions with other yeast proteins were detected, and cleavage efficiency was limited. In contrast, MESNA released significantly more protein from the yeast surface while also generating a unique thioester at the carboxy-terminus of the released protein. These protein thioesters were subsequently reacted with a cysteine alkyne in an EPL reaction and then employed in an azide-alkyne cycloaddition to immobilize the scFv and GFP on an azide-decorated surface with >90% site-specificity. Importantly, the immobilized proteins retained their activity. Since yeast surface display is also a protein engineering platform, these approaches provide a particularly powerful tool for the rapid assessment of engineered proteins.
Molecular pathology of non-small cell lung cancer: a practical guide. - American journal of clinical pathology
The traditional distinction between small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is no longer sufficient for treatment planning. It is advised to handle small diagnostic specimens prudently because they are often the only specimen available for molecular analysis. Pathologists are experiencing pressure to subclassify lung carcinoma based on extremely small tumor samples, because NSCLC tumor subtyping is now essential to determine molecular testing strategies. Evaluation for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements are now considered to be the standard of care in advanced-stage pulmonary adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemical stains can aid in subclassifying NSCLC, but performing these ancillary studies can significantly reduce the quantity of tissue available for molecular tests, requiring careful balancing of these 2 needs. The pathologist plays a pivotal role in facilitating clear and timely communication between the clinical oncology care team and the molecular laboratory to ensure that the appropriate tests are ordered and optimal material is submitted for testing.
Injury incidence and patterns in workers with intellectual disability: a comparative study. - Journal of intellectual & developmental disability
Workplace safety is a concern in the employment of persons with intellectual disability, due to both real concerns for employee well-being, and the effect that negative perceptions of safety risk can have on hiring.This study involved a retrospective analysis of workplace insurance claim records for workers with and without disability in a Canadian social enterprise.Workers with intellectual disability sustained fewer injuries and experienced fewer absences due to injury than workers without disability. Lost-time injury rates for this business were not significantly different from those reported by other employers in the jurisdiction.Workplace safety is a concern for all workers, but fear of increased injury rates and heightened compensation costs should not be perceived as a risk when hiring individuals with intellectual disability.
Interprofessional jargon: how is it exclusionary? Cultural determinants of language use in health care practice. - Journal of interprofessional care
Language can impact significantly on the ways in which health care professionals relate and provide clinical services, as well as the way in which patients conceptualize their role in the healthcare encounter. The aim of this project was to explore the barriers and challenges to developing a collaborative approach in health care. A hermeneutic research approach was used with a convenience sample of international key informants representing 6 disciplines. A total of 10 individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted. Findings emphasized the need to be more inclusive by avoiding the use of exclusionary jargon so that all members of the health care team, including patients and families, can adopt a collaborative practice orientation.
The utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphoproliferative disorders. - Cancer cytopathology
Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy is routinely used to stage lung cancer; however, its usefulness in diagnosing lymphoproliferative disorders has not been well established. In this retrospective study, we determined the utility of EBUS-TBNA in evaluating mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients with suspected lymphoproliferative disorders.The authors searched the pathology database at their institution to identify all patients who had undergone EBUS-TBNA biopsy for possible lymphoproliferative disorders. The cytologic diagnoses were correlated with concurrent and subsequent biopsy findings and clinical follow-up data.Of 886 lymph nodes evaluated by EBUS-TBNA biopsy, 91 nodes from 33 patients (23 men and 10 women) were eligible. Fourteen patients had a history of lymphoma. Adequate material for diagnosis was obtained in 31 of 34 procedures (1 patient had 2 procedures). The cytologic diagnoses of the 31 adequate procedures included 19 with benign disease (8 reactive lymph nodes and 11 granulomatous inflammation), 8 with lymphoma (2 large B-cell, 2 small lymphocytic, 2 Hodgkin, 1 mantle cell, and 1 T-cell lymphoblastic), 2 with cells suspicious for Hodgkin lymphoma, and 2 cases with atypical cells.EBUS-TBNA proved to be useful for evaluating mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients with suspected lymphoproliferative disorders. Its use may decrease the need for invasive diagnostic procedures. Immediate assessment is valuable in these cases because of the need to triage material for immunophenotyping or other studies to determine optimal and clinically meaningful diagnoses.Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

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12605 E 16Th Ave
Aurora, CO 80045
720 480-0000
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720 480-0000
12605 E 16Th Ave
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Aurora, CO 80045
720 771-1234