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Dr. Hoai-Nghia  Nguyen  Md image

Dr. Hoai-Nghia Nguyen Md

7452 Fulton Dr Nw
Massillon OH 44646
330 379-9249
Medical School: University Of Miami School Of Medicine - 1993
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 35072978
NPI: 1508815929
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X 208000000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Hoai-Nghia Nguyen is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$232.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$157.42
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$149.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$101.34
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$149.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$102.52
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$105.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.99
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$99.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.47
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$59.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$41.06
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$18.31
HCPCS Code:99211 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$29.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$18.85

HCPCS Code Definitions

99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
99211
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, that may not require the presence of a physician or other qualified health care professional. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are minimal. Typically, 5 minutes are spent performing or supervising these services.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1851390116
Diagnostic Radiology
408
1942209168
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
405
1891725537
Family Practice
364
1366552317
Diagnostic Radiology
281
1700878527
Diagnostic Radiology
274
1194706408
Internal Medicine
199
1174512438
Family Practice
194
1033192463
Pathology
175
1518917848
Vascular Surgery
145
1851373203
Pathology
136
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Nguyen has made to other doctors

Publications

Opening the conformation is a master switch for the dual localization and phosphatase activity of PTEN. - Scientific reports
Tumor suppressor PTEN mainly functions at two subcellular locations, the plasma membrane and the nucleus. At the plasma membrane, PTEN dephosphorylates the tumorigenic second messenger PIP3, which drives cell proliferation and migration. In the nucleus, PTEN controls DNA repair and genome stability independently of PIP3. Whereas the concept that a conformational change regulates protein function through post-translational modifications has been well established in biology, it is unknown whether a conformational change simultaneously controls dual subcellular localizations of proteins. Here, we discovered that opening the conformation of PTEN is the crucial upstream event that determines its key dual localizations of this crucial tumor suppressor. We identify a critical conformational switch that regulates PTEN's localization. Most PTEN molecules are held in the cytosol in a closed conformation by intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal tail and core region. Dephosphorylation of the tail opens the conformation and exposes the membrane-binding regulatory interface in the core region, recruiting PTEN to the membrane. Moreover, a lysine at residue 13 is also exposed and when ubiquitinated, transports PTEN to the nucleus. Thus, opening the conformation of PTEN is a key mechanism that enhances its dual localization and enzymatic activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer treatments.
Identification of a functional nuclear translocation sequence in hPPIP5K2. - BMC cell biology
Cells contain several inositol pyrophosphates (PP-InsPs; also known as diphosphoinositol polyphosphates), which play pivotal roles in cellular and organismic homeostasis. It has been proposed that determining mechanisms of compartmentation of the synthesis of a particular PP-InsP is key to understanding how each of them may exert a specific function. Human PPIP5K2 (hPPIP5K2), one of the key enzymes that synthesizes PP-InsPs, contains a putative consensus sequence for a nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, such in silico analysis has limited predictive power, and may be complicated by phosphorylation events that can dynamically modulate NLS function. We investigated if this candidate NLS is functional and regulated, using the techniques of cell biology, mutagenesis and mass spectrometry.Multiple sequence alignments revealed that the metazoan PPIP5K2 family contains a candidate NLS within a strikingly well-conserved 63 amino-acid domain. By analyzing the distribution of hPPIP5K2-GFP in HEK293T cells with the techniques of confocal microscopy and imaging flow cytometry, we found that a distinct pool of hPPIP5K2 is present in the nucleus. Imaging flow cytometry yielded particular insight into the characteristics of the nuclear hPPIP5K2 sub-pool, through a high-throughput, statistically-robust analysis of many hundreds of cells. Mutagenic disruption of the candidate NLS in hPPIP5K2 reduced its degree of nuclear localization. Proximal to the NLS is a Ser residue (S1006) that mass spectrometry data indicate is phosphorylated inside cells. The degree of nuclear localization of hPPIP5K2 was increased when S1006 was rendered non-phosphorylatable by its mutation to Ala. Conversely, a S1006D phosphomimetic mutant of hPPIP5K2 exhibited a lower degree of nuclear localization.The current study describes for the first time the functional significance of an NLS in the conserved PPIP5K2 family. We have further demonstrated that there is phosphorylation of a Ser residue that is proximal to the NLS of hPPIP5K2. These conclusions draw attention to nuclear compartmentation of PPIP5K2 as being a physiologically relevant and covalently-regulated event. Our study also increases general insight into the consensus sequences of other NLSs, the functions of which might be similarly regulated.
Engineering PTEN function: membrane association and activity. - Methods (San Diego, Calif.)
Many tumors are associated with deficiency of the tumor suppressor, PTEN, a PIP3 phosphatase that turns off PIP3 signaling. The major site of PTEN action is the plasma membrane, where PIP3 is produced by PI3 kinases. However, the mechanism and functional importance of PTEN membrane recruitment are poorly defined. Using the heterologous expression system in which human PTEN is expressed in Dictyostelium discoideum, we defined the molecular mechanisms that regulate the membrane-binding site through inhibitory interactions with the phosphorylated C-terminal tail. In addition, we potentiated mechanisms that mediate PTEN membrane association and engineered an enhanced PTEN with increased tumor suppressor functions. Moreover, we identified a new class of cancer-associated PTEN mutations that are specifically defective in membrane association. In this review, we summarize recent advances in PTEN-membrane interactions and methods useful in addressing PTEN function.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Engineering ePTEN, an enhanced PTEN with increased tumor suppressor activities. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) is a key regulator of cell proliferation, survival, and migration and the enzyme that dephosphorylates it, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), is an important tumor suppressor. As excess PIP3 signaling is a hallmark of many cancers, its suppression through activation of PTEN is a potential cancer intervention. Using a heterologous expression system in which human PTEN-GFP is expressed in Dictyostelium cells, we identified mutations in the membrane-binding regulatory interface that increase the recruitment of PTEN to the plasma membrane due to enhanced association with PI(4,5)P2. We engineered these into an enhanced PTEN (ePTEN) with approximately eightfold increased ability to suppress PIP3 signaling. Upon expression in human cells, ePTEN decreases PIP3 levels in the plasma membrane; phosphorylation of AKT, a major downstream event in PIP3 signaling; and cell proliferation and migration. Thus, the activation of PTEN can readjust PIP3 signaling and may serve as a feasible target for anticancer therapies.
Loss of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase rescues spore development in G protein mutant in dictyostelium. - Cellular signalling
Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an important intracellular signaling molecule for many G protein-mediated signaling pathways but the specificity of cAMP signaling in cells with multiple signaling pathways is not well-understood. In Dictyostelium, at least two different G protein signaling pathways, mediated by the Gα2 and Gα4 subunits, are involved with cAMP accumulation, spore production, and chemotaxis and the stimulation of these pathways results in the activation of ERK2, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that can down regulate the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase RegA. The regA gene was disrupted in gα2(−) and gα4(−) cells to determine if the absence of this phosphodiesterase rescues the development of these G protein mutants as it does for erk2(−) mutants. There gA(−) mutation had no major effects on developmental morphology but enriched the distribution of the Gα mutant cells to the prespore/prestalk border in chimeric aggregates. The loss of RegA function had no effect on Gα4- mediated folate chemotaxis. However, the regA gene disruption in gα4(−) cells, but not in gα2(−) cells, resulted in a substantial rescue and acceleration of spore production. This rescue in sporulation required cell autonomous signaling because the precocious sporulation could not be induced through intercellular signaling in chimeric aggregates. However, intercellular signals from regA(−) strains increased the expression of the prestalk gene ecmB and accelerated the vacuolization of stalk cells. Intercellular signaling from the gα4(−)regA(−) strain did not induce ecmA gene expression indicating cell-type specificity in the promotion of prestalk cell development. regA gene disruption in a Gα4(HC) (Gα4 overexpression) strain did not result in precocious sporulation or stalk cell development indicating that elevated Gα4 subunit expression can mask regA(−) associated phenotypes even when provided with wild-type intercellular signaling. These findings indicate that the Gα2 and Gα4-mediated pathways provide different contributions to the development of spores and stalk cells and that the absence of RegA function can bypass some but not all defects in G protein regulated spore development.
MAPKs in development: insights from Dictyostelium signaling pathways. - Biomolecular concepts
Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play important roles in the development of eukaryotic organisms through the regulation of signal transduction pathways stimulated by external signals. MAPK signaling pathways have been associated with the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and chemotaxis, indicating MAPKs contribute to a diverse set of developmental processes. In most eukaryotes, the diversity of external signals is likely to far exceed the diversity of MAPKs, suggesting that multiple signaling pathways might share MAPKs. Do different signaling pathways converge before MAPK function or can MAPKs maintain signaling specificity through interactions with specific proteins? The genetic and biochemical analysis of MAPK pathways in simple eukaryotes such as Dictyostelium offers opportunities to investigate functional specificity of MAPKs in G protein-mediated signal transduction pathways. This review considers the regulation and specificity of MAPK function in pathways that control Dictyostelium growth and development.
MAP kinases have different functions in Dictyostelium G protein-mediated signaling. - Cellular signalling
Extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERKs) are a class of MAP kinases that function in many signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells and in some cases, a single stimulus can activate more than one ERK suggesting functional redundancy or divergence from a common pathway. Dictyostelium discoideum encodes only two MAP kinases, ERK1 and ERK2, that both function during the developmental life cycle. To determine if ERK1 and ERK2 have overlapping functions, chemotactic and developmental phenotypes of erk1(-) and erk2(-) mutants were assessed with respect to G protein-mediated signal transduction pathways. ERK1 was specifically required for Galpha5-mediated tip morphogenesis and inhibition of folate chemotaxis but not for cAMP-stimulated chemotaxis or cGMP accumulation. ERK2 was the primary MAPK phosphorylated in response to folate or cAMP stimulation. Cell growth was not altered in erk1(-), erk2(-) or erk1(-)erk2(-) mutants but each mutant displayed a different pattern of cell sorting in chimeric aggregates. The distribution of GFP-ERK1 or GFP-ERK2 fusion proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus was not grossly altered in cells stimulated with cAMP or folate. These results suggest ERK1 and ERK2 have different roles in G protein-mediated signaling during growth and development.2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
G{alpha}5 subunit-mediated signalling requires a D-motif and the MAPK ERK1 in Dictyostelium. - Microbiology (Reading, England)
The Dictyostelium Galpha5 subunit has been shown to reduce cell viability, inhibit folate chemotaxis and accelerate tip morphogenesis and gene expression during multicellular development. Alteration of the D-motif (mitogen-activated protein kinase docking site) at the amino terminus of the Galpha 5 subunit or the loss of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1 diminished the lethality associated with the overexpression or constitutive activation of the Galpha5 subunit. The amino-terminal D-motif of the Galpha5 subunit was also found to be necessary for the reduced cell size, small aggregate formation and precocious developmental gene expression associated with Galpha5 subunit overexpression. This D-motif also contributed to the aggregation delay in cells expressing a constitutively active Galpha5 subunit, but the D-motif was not necessary for the inhibition of folate chemotaxis. These results suggest that the amino-terminal D-motif is required for some but not all phenotypes associated with elevated Galpha5 subunit functions during growth and development and that ERK1 can function in Galpha5 subunit-mediated signal transduction.
The Galpha4 G protein subunit interacts with the MAP kinase ERK2 using a D-motif that regulates developmental morphogenesis in Dictyostelium. - Developmental biology
G protein Galpha subunits contribute to the specificity of different signal transduction pathways in Dictyostelium discoideum but Galpha subunit-effector interactions have not been previously identified. The requirement of the Dictyostelium Galpha4 subunit for MAP kinase (MAPK) activation and the identification of a putative MAPK docking site (D-motif) in this subunit suggested a possible interaction between the Galpha4 subunit and MAPKs. In vivo association of the Galpha4 subunit and ERK2 was demonstrated by pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Alteration of the D-motif reduced Galpha4 subunit-ERK2 interactions but only slightly altered MAPK activation in response to folate. Expression of the Galpha4 subunit with the altered D-motif in galpha4(-)cells allowed for slug formation but not the morphogenesis associated with culmination. Expression of this mutant Galpha4 subunit was sufficient to rescue chemotactic movement to folate. Alteration of the D-motif also reduced the aggregation defect associated with constitutively active Galpha4 subunits. These results suggest Galpha4 subunit-MAPK interactions are necessary for developmental morphogenesis but not for chemotaxis to folate.

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7452 Fulton Dr Nw Massillon, OH 44646
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